8 research outputs found

    Additional file 1: Table S1. of The importance of health behaviours in childhood for the development of internalizing disorders during adolescence

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    Logistic regressions for the associations of health behaviours in childhood with internalizing disorder in adolescence among participants of the Children’s Lifestyle and School Performance Study, Nova Scotia, Canada. (DOCX 20 kb

    Does School-Based Health Promotion Affect Physical Activity on Weekends? And, Does It Reach Those Students Most in Need of Health Promotion?

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    <div><p>Objective</p><p>To determine whether a school-based health promotion program affects children’s weekend physical activity and whether this effect varies according to socioeconomic-status.</p><p>Methods</p><p>This was a quasi-experimental trial of school-based programs on physical activity levels implemented in disadvantaged neighborhoods in Alberta, Canada. In 2009 and 2011, 7 full days of pedometer data were collected from cross-sectional samples of grade 5 students (age 10–11 years) from 10 intervention schools in low-socioeconomic neighbourhoods and 20 comparison schools in middle-socioeconomic neighbourhoods. Multilevel models assessed differences in step-counts between intervention and comparison groups over-time by weight (objectively measured) and socioeconomic status subgroups.</p><p>Results</p><p>In 2009, children from intervention schools were less active on weekends relative to comparison schools (9212 vs. 11186 steps/day p<0.01). Two years later, daily step-counts on weekend days among children in low socioeconomic intervention schools increased such that they approximated those of children from middle socioeconomic comparison schools (12148 vs. 12121 steps/day p = 0.96). The relative difference in steps between intervention and comparison schools on weekends reduced from -21.4% to 0.2% following the intervention. The normalization of weekend step counts was similar for normal weight (–21.4% to +2.0%) and overweight (-19.1 to +3.9%) children, and was balanced across socioeconomic subgroups.</p><p>Conclusions</p><p>These data suggest that school-based health promotion is effective for reducing inequities in physical activity levels outside school hours. Investments in school-based health promotion lead to behavior modification beyond the school environment.</p><p>Trial Registration</p><p>ClinicalTrials.gov <a href="http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01914185" target="_blank">NCT01914185</a></p></div

    Description of enrollment of schools in the study and participation of grade 5 students in data collection, their pedometer usage, and analyses.

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    <p>Description of enrollment of schools in the study and participation of grade 5 students in data collection, their pedometer usage, and analyses.</p

    Mean number of steps taken among all students from APPLE Schools and comparison schools in 2009 and 2011 on a) school days; b) weekend days; c) school hours; and d) non-school hours.

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    <p>Mean number of steps taken among all students from APPLE Schools and comparison schools in 2009 and 2011 on a) school days; b) weekend days; c) school hours; and d) non-school hours.</p

    Characteristics of grade 5 students attending APPLE Schools and comparison schools in 2009 and 2011.

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    <p><sup>a</sup>: APPLE Schools = Alberta Project Promoting active Living and healthy Eating Schools</p><p>Characteristics of grade 5 students attending APPLE Schools and comparison schools in 2009 and 2011.</p

    Inequity in physical activity levels (steps/day) on school days (Monday-Friday) and weekend days (Saturday, Sunday, holidays) by grade 5 students attending APPLE Schools and comparison schools over a two-year interval (2009–2011) of a Comprehensive School Health intervention.

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    <p><sup>a</sup>; CI = Confidence interval</p><p><sup>b</sup>: |relative difference in 2009|+Relative difference in 2011</p><p><sup>c</sup>:adjustments for potential confounders included: gender, parental education, and household income</p><p><sup>d</sup>: adjustments for potential confounders included: gender</p><p>Note: bolded 95% CI indicate statistical significance at p<0.05.</p><p>Inequity in physical activity levels (steps/day) on school days (Monday-Friday) and weekend days (Saturday, Sunday, holidays) by grade 5 students attending APPLE Schools and comparison schools over a two-year interval (2009–2011) of a Comprehensive School Health intervention.</p

    Inequity in physical activity levels (steps/hour) during school (8:00am–3:59pm) and non-school hours (7:00–7:59am & 4:00–8:59pm) by grade 5 students attending APPLE Schools and comparison schools over a two-year interval (2009–2011) of a Comprehensive School Health intervention.

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    <p><sup>a</sup>; CI = Confidence interval</p><p><sup>b</sup>: |relative difference in 2009|+Relative difference in 2011</p><p><sup>c</sup>:adjustments for potential confounders included: gender, parental education, and household income</p><p><sup>d</sup>: adjustments for potential confounders included: gender</p><p>Note: bolded 95% CI indicate statistical significance at p<0.05.</p><p>Inequity in physical activity levels (steps/hour) during school (8:00am–3:59pm) and non-school hours (7:00–7:59am & 4:00–8:59pm) by grade 5 students attending APPLE Schools and comparison schools over a two-year interval (2009–2011) of a Comprehensive School Health intervention.</p
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