5 research outputs found

    Role of Work and Family Factors in Predicting Career Satisfaction and Life Success

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    The mediating roles of work-family balance, job satisfaction and family satisfaction in work-family dynamics research has not been explored fully to delineate their probable intervening effects. Using spillover theory as the basis, the current study tests a model to identify the role of these factors in work-family conflict (and work-role ambiguity), career satisfaction and perception of life success. Responses obtained through an online survey from a final sample of 344 academic faculty, across different educational institutions in India, tend to suggest that work-family balance mediated work-family conflict and its potential influence on life success as well as career satisfaction, and also the relationship between work-role ambiguity and both life success and career satisfaction. While job satisfaction also showed similar results except for non-significant mediation between work-role ambiguity and life success, family satisfaction mediated only between work role ambiguity and life success. The importance of job satisfaction and work-family balance is highlighted in the context of reducing the negative impact of work-family conflict and work-role ambiguity on one’s career and life satisfaction. Results and their practical and theoretical implications, and future directions of research to further our understanding of work-family dynamics, etc., are discussed

    Performance pressure and innovative work behaviour: The role of problem-orientated daydreams

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    The study advances stress and daydreaming (mind wandering) literature by exploring the relationship between performance pressure and innovative work behaviour. We examine whether problem-orientated daydreams mediate the relationship between performance pressure and innovative work behaviour. We also investigate the mediating role of problem-orientated daydreams between performance pressure and task performance. A cross-sectional survey was conducted amongst academicians in India. A theoretical model was tested using structural equation modelling techniques. The results indicate that problem-orientated daydreams mediate the relationship between performance pressure and innovative work behaviour. Further, results also support the hypothesised relationship between performance pressure and task performance mediated by problem-orientated daydreams. Our results hold while controlling for gender and institutional tenure for our hypothesised model
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