6,037 research outputs found

    Evaluating The Effects of an Educational Lifestyle Modification Intervention on Blood Pressure in Adults With Prehypertension

    Get PDF
    The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational lifestyle modification (LM) intervention on blood pressure (BP) among adults with prehypertension. Prehypertension is a precursor to hypertension (HTN) and is a public epidemic in the United States. Approximately 68 million (31%) U.S. adult’s aged ≥18 years have hypertension. Hypertension can cause significant target organ damage, lead to coronary heart disease, heart failure, stroke, and kidney failure. Early identification and the primary treatment of persons with prehypertension with LM have the potential to minimize the progression and delay the onset of comorbidities associated with hypertension. This quality improvement project retrospectively reviewed changes in blood pressure for a small sample (n=5) of patients diagnosed with prehypertension who received education about modifying lifestyle behaviors according to nationally accepted clinical practice guidelines. Blood pressure measurements were extracted from the medical record beginning at the time of the education through a three month period. Descriptive data indicates that all five patients had a decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The median systolic blood pressure at baseline was 129 mmHg decreasing to 121 mmHg at end of study period. The median diastolic blood pressure was 86 mmHg decreasing to 76 mmHg. Integration of lifestyle modification education and subsequent blood pressure monitoring during a routine primary care visit is feasible and may help motivate patients to implement changes and subsequently reduce blood pressure. Future studies should include identifying strategies for improving patient participation

    Social Justice and the Basic Course: A Central Student Learning Outcome

    Get PDF
    The economic, social, political, cultural, and environmental dimensions of globalization impacting our society demand new ways of thinking, acting, and teaching the Basic Communication Course (BCC). By emphasizing the learning outcomes of intellectual and practical skills and acceptance of personal and social responsibility, students will experience a new central learning outcome: what we are calling a social justice sensibility. In this essay we will emphasize the need to integrate the intellectual and practical skills of oral communication and personal and social justice in the BCC. We will discuss how the BCC can help students learn habits of citizenship and the art of parrhesia by incorporating service learning for social justice advocacy. Importantly, we discuss how faculty can modify their grading rubric to assess this new outcome

    G-CSF in stem cell mobilization: new insights, new questions

    Get PDF

    Large deviations for Markov jump processes with uniformly diminishing rates

    Get PDF
    We prove a large-deviation principle (LDP) for the sample paths of jump Markov processes in the small noise limit when, possibly, all the jump rates vanish uniformly, but slowly enough, in a region of the state space. We further show that our assumptions on the decay of the jump rates are optimal. As a direct application of this work we relax the assumptions needed for the application of LDPs to, e.g., Chemical Reaction Network dynamics, where vanishing reaction rates arise naturally particularly the context of Mass action kinetics

    Fusiform activation to animals is driven by the process, not the stimulus

    Get PDF
    Previous studies have found that the lateral posterior fusiform gyri respond more robustly to pictures of animals than pictures of manmade objects and suggested that these regions encode the visual properties characteristic of animals. We suggest that such effects actually reflect processing demands arising when items with similar representations must be finely discriminated. In a positron emission tomography (PET) study of category verification with colored photographs of animals and vehicles, there was robust animal-specific activation in the lateral posterior fusiform gyri when stimuli were categorized at an intermediate level of specificity (e.g., dog or car). However, when the same photographs were categorized at a more specific level (e.g., Labrador or BMW), these regions responded equally strongly to animals and vehicles. We conclude that the lateral posterior fusiform does not encode domain-specific representations of animals or visual properties characteristic of animals. Instead, these regions are strongly activated whenever an item must be discriminated from many close visual or semantic competitors. Apparent category effects arise because, at an intermediate level of specificity, animals have more visual and semantic competitors than do artifacts

    An overview of malaria in pregnancy

    Get PDF
    One hundred twenty-five million pregnant women are at risk for contracting malaria, a preventable cause of maternal and infant morbidity and death. Malaria parasites contribute to adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes due to their preferential accumulation in placental intervillous spaces. Pregnant women are particularly vulnerable to malaria infections, and malaria infections during pregnancy put their fetuses at risk. Malaria in pregnancy is associated with anemia, stillbirth, low birth weight and maternal and fetal death. We review the challenges to diagnosing malaria in pregnancy, as well as strategies to prevent and treat malaria in pregnancy. Finally, we discuss the current gaps in knowledge and potential areas for continued research

    Revisioning the basic communication course in the context of globalization

    Get PDF
    The purpose of this dissertation is to examine how to revision the basic undergraduate communication course in the context of globalization. This research establishes the significance of the spiral of silence theory in relation to the communication process and the college classroom. This dissertation also examines the culture of silence and discusses how critical pedagogy can help transform our society, students, and classrooms. The methodology in this research utilizes interpretive inquiry to examine 35 basic communication course syllabi from community colleges and universities across the country. The study reveals a performance and skills-based approach to this course does not adequately prepare students to become competent and engaged communicators in a global society. The conclusion introduces and explains how the model of intercultural praxis can be utilized for curriculum development to revise the basic communication course from a global perspective

    PWHATSHAP: efficient haplotyping for future generation sequencing

    Get PDF
    Background: Haplotype phasing is an important problem in the analysis of genomics information. Given a set of DNA fragments of an individual, it consists of determining which one of the possible alleles (alternative forms of a gene) each fragment comes from. Haplotype information is relevant to gene regulation, epigenetics, genome-wide association studies, evolutionary and population studies, and the study of mutations. Haplotyping is currently addressed as an optimisation problem aiming at solutions that minimise, for instance, error correction costs, where costs are a measure of the con dence in the accuracy of the information acquired from DNA sequencing. Solutions have typically an exponential computational complexity. WhatsHap is a recent optimal approach which moves computational complexity from DNA fragment length to fragment overlap, i.e. coverage, and is hence of particular interest when considering sequencing technology's current trends that are producing longer fragments.  Results: Given the potential relevance of ecient haplotyping in several analysis pipelines, we have designed and engineered pWhatsHap, a parallel, high-performance version of WhatsHap. pWhatsHap is embedded in a toolkit developed in Python and supports genomics datasets in standard le formats. Building on WhatsHap, pWhatsHap exhibits the same complexity exploring a number of possible solutions which is exponential in the coverage of the dataset. The parallel implementation on multi-core architectures allows for a relevant reduction of the execution time for haplotyping, while the provided results enjoy the same high accuracy as that provided by WhatsHap, which increases with coverage.  Conclusions: Due to its structure and management of the large datasets, the parallelisation of WhatsHap posed demanding technical challenges, which have been addressed exploiting a high-level parallel programming framework. The result, pWhatsHap, is a freely available toolkit that improves the eciency of the analysis of genomics information

    Once-Weekly Exenatide as Adjunct Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Patients Receiving Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy

    Get PDF
    Objective The use of once-weekly exenatide in type 2 diabetes mellitus is well supported, but little is known about its effectiveness in type 1 diabetes. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical efficacy of once-weekly exenatide on glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes when added to basal-bolus insulin therapy. Methods For this retrospective study, patients with type 1 diabetes, aged 18 years and older, receiving continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, using a continuous glucose monitoring device or regularly measuring blood glucose levels and receiving 2 mg of exenatide once weekly for at least 3 months were included. Demographic information, glycated hemoglobin (A1C), body weight, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, total daily insulin dose, basal and bolus insulin doses, 28-day continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion glucose average and incidence of hypoglycemia were collected at baseline and 3 months after beginning therapy with once-weekly exenatide. Results An electronic medical record search identified 11 patients with type 1 diabetes who met the inclusion criteria. Comparing baseline and 3 months after initiation of once-weekly exenatide revealed reductions of 0.6% in A1C (p=0.013), 3.7% in body weight (p=0.008), 1.7 kg/m2 in body mass index (p=0.003), 13% in total daily insulin dose (p=0.011) and 9.3 units in bolus insulin dose (p=0.015). Conclusions This study revealed that the addition of once-weekly exenatide to insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes patients leads to significant improvements in A1C, body weight, body mass index and insulin doses

    International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force Consensus Proposal: Diagnostic approach to epilepsy in dogs

    Get PDF
    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient presenting with a history of suspected epileptic seizures incorporates two fundamental steps: to establish if the events the animal is demonstrating truly represent epileptic seizures and if so, to identify their underlying cause. Differentiation of epileptic seizures from other non-epileptic episodic paroxysmal events can be challenging. Criteria that can be used to make this differentiation are presented in detail and discussed. Criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy (IE) are described in a three-tier system. Tier I confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on a history of two or more unprovoked epileptic seizures occurring at least 24 h apart, age at epileptic seizure onset of between six months and six years, unremarkable inter-ictal physical and neurological examination, and no significant abnormalities on minimum data base blood tests and urinalysis. Tier II confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and unremarkable fasting and post-prandial bile acids, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain (based on an epilepsy-specific brain MRI protocol) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Tier III confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and II and identification of electroencephalographic abnormalities characteristic for seizure disorders. The authors recommend performing MRI of the brain and routine CSF analysis, after exclusion of reactive seizures, in dogs with age at epileptic seizure onset 6 years, inter-ictal neurological abnormalities consistent with intracranial neurolocalisation, status epilepticus or cluster seizure at epileptic seizure onset, or a previous presumptive diagnosis of IE and drug-resistance with a single antiepileptic drug titrated to the highest tolerable dose
    • …
    corecore