24 research outputs found

    Masculine vs Feminine Personality Traits and Women’s Employment Outcomes in Britain: A Field Experiment

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    In the current study, we utilized a correspondent test to capture the way in which firms respond to women who exhibit masculine and feminine personality traits. In doing so, we minimized the potential for reverse causality bias and unobserved heterogeneities to occur. Women who exhibit masculine personality traits have a 4.3 percentage points greater likelihood of gaining access to occupations than those displaying feminine personality traits. In both male- and female-dominated occupations, women with masculine personality traits have an occupational access advantage, as compared to those exhibiting feminine personality traits. Moreover, women with masculine personality traits take up positions which offer 10 percentage points higher wages, in comparison with those displaying feminine personality traits. Furthermore, wage premiums are higher for those exhibiting masculine personality traits in male-dominated occupations, than for female-dominated positions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first field experiment to examine the effect of masculine and feminine personality traits on entry-level pay scales. As feminine personality traits are stereotypically attributed to women, and these characteristics appear to yield fewer rewards within the market, they may offer one of many plausible explanations as to why women experience higher unemployment rates, whilst also receiving lower earnings, as compared to men

    Investigating dynamic capabilities, agility and knowledge management within EMNEs- longitudinal evidence from Europe

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    Purpose: This paper aims to analyse the impact of dynamic capability (DC) of emerging market multinationals (EMNEs) on their firm technological performance by teasing out the concepts of agility and knowledge management (KM) through DC. Design/methodology/approach: Evidence from this study is contextualised on EMNEs that operate in the UK, Germany and France. This study examines the investment in intangible assets which EMNEs use to develop their DC over the period 2005-2016 and how this leads to increased firm technological performance. Findings: Results show that higher investments in DC allow EMNEs to be more agile and gain competencies through KM and thereby sustain competitiveness in the three leading European countries. This research also identifies which EMNE groupings show greater technological performance and how such EMNE groupings are able to translate dynamic capabilities into greater technological performance compared to others over time. In summary, the role of DC during of the global financial crisis was also examined, where they are required to be more agile. Originality/value: This paper sheds light on a novel way and motivation of successful EMNEs in using developed host countries as a location for generating DC through agility and KM

    Unravelling processes of alliance capability development: Longitudinal processual insights from an emerging country multinational enterprise

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    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore and unbundle the complex processes underpinning development of alliance capabilities, particularly in the context of emerging country multinational enterprises. More specifically, this paper focuses on how firms internalize and translate knowledge generated from experiences gained by participating in international collaborations. Design/methodology/approach: The authors adopt an exploratory case study approach to undertake in-depth processual analysis of alliance capability development in an Indian biopharmaceutical company. The authors focused their analysis on the initial four international alliances the company formed and identified key elements pertaining to alliance capabilities that the company internalized and those that it could not, as this was key in understanding alliance capability. Findings: The research shows that based on experiences from previous alliances, the Indian organization was able to overhaul its negotiation and governance designing processes and practices as well as made robust changes to its internal communication and coordination practices. Interestingly, the company organization, however, did not make any significant changes to its processes and practices regarding partner selection. Practical implications: The results from our study can be used by managers to develop processes and practices when it comes to developing alliance capabilities. Originality/value: The paper is novel, as it addresses two specific gaps in the nascent alliance capability literature. First, it provides insights on how different constituent elements/aspects of alliance capability actually develop and integrate within the organizational system over time, and in the process, the paper identifies that some aspects are better internalized as compared to other aspects. Second, by focusing the attention on an Indian biopharmaceutical company, the authors attempt to address a gap in alliance capability development research, which has been neglected in emerging country multinational entities

    Managing and preparing for emerging infectious diseases: Avoiding a catastrophe

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    The extent and impact of neglected diseases has been well documented in the public health and medical science literature. However, from a strategic management and organizational perspective, there is a gap in understanding the complex relationships that underpin the functioning of Product Development Partnerships (PDPs) in managing the drug development process. This paper focuses on (a) identifying the importance of PDPs in the development of new drugs for neglected and emerging infectious diseases; and (b) identifying the key stakeholders, their relationships and (levels) of dependencies in PDPs through the resource dependency lens. Our model offers a unique perspective to the strategic alliance literature by not only showing the complex interrelationships between various stakeholders but also in highlighting power, trust and governance ask key challenges. Based on our extensive analysis of the literature and the contextualization of the recent Novel Coronavirus epidemic as a case, we offer conclusions and reflections on the ability of PDPs to mitigate risks related to neglected and emerging infectious diseases from a management perspective

    The quest for ethics amidst institutional change: the case of Ghana’s mining industry

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    This paper aims to explore and examine the evolution of ethical practices in Ghana’s mining industry from colonial era to contemporary times. From the period of colonial rule to the era of political independence in 1957, the mining industry in Ghana has undergone significant institutional changes from foreign dominance to nationalisation. Equally, the introduction of monetary policies to reform the Ghanaian economy in the 1980s brought about massive changes in the mining industry, particularly, the ownership structure and fiscal regime. This era witnessed the reversal of ownership from state-controlled to privatisation

    Psychological Contract and Social Identity in the midst of change / strategic alliance

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    Facilitating collaborative capability development in Devon and Cornwall and Dorset police forces: Analysis of the findings from the survey

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    Inter-organisational collaborations as embedded social systems : a critical realist explanation of alliance evolution

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    One of the central debates that pervade research on inter-organisational collaborations pertains to explaining how alliance structures and process interact over time. In fact, in recent years different scholars have responded to calls to integrate these aspects in undertaking longitudinal research on alliance evolution. This thesis is an attempt to study and explain dynamic processes that underpin alliance evolution. The potential contribution of this thesis is threefold. First, it responds to calls for more theoretical and empirical studies on the evolution of alliances. Second, it attempts to provide a multi-level explanation of alliance evolution by 'paying attention to events that took place at inter-organisational (between the partner organisations); intra- organisational (within the partner organisations) and external/competitive and institutional environment levels. Third, it explores the dynamic interaction that takes place between alliance structure and social actors and which underpins alliance evolution in general. This three tier agenda is explored through a broad research question: 'Under what conditions do inter-organisational collaborations evolve over time?' The thesis, through critical realist lens, conceptualises alliances as dynamic and embedded social systems which are embedded in the environments of their parent organisations as well as the broader industry structure. Social structure of an alliance is thus represented by a nexus of internal and necessary and external and contingent structural relations and evolution of an alliance takes place when these structural relations undergo transformation or reproduction. The thesis adopts morphogenetic / stasis approach to explore and explain how pre-existing structural conditions, as a consequence of prior social action, influence social interaction in one morphogenetic cycle and which in turn creates conditions for social interaction in the subsequent cycles.EThOS - Electronic Theses Online ServiceGBUnited Kingdo
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