250 research outputs found

    'Inspiring Futures' - How social impact measurement as a form of organisational performance management can enhance outcomes for children and young people in custody

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    Since 2008, the number of children and young people entering the youth justice system has reduced, as has the use of custody (YJB, 2018). Despite this decrease, the youth justice system exists in a wider context with austerity measures reducing available resources and provisions for children and young people (UK Children’s Commissioner, 2015), which in turn increases the requirements for effective and sustainable interventions that improve outcomes. Measuring the social impact of custody for children and young people is a nascent area academically, with current measurement approaches focused on output and outcome rather than social impact (Paterson-Young et al., 2017). This research employed a sequential mixed method approach that promoted the active participation of children and young people, as well as staff members in Secure Training Centres (STCs). Results supported the development of a social impact measurement framework to examine the outcomes and social impact of custody on children and young people, and illustrate that the current STC model lacks the multi-stakeholder approach that promotes stakeholder engagement, individual focused interventions, evidence based approaches and service redesign (Hazenberg, Seddon and Denny, 2014). Failure to develop such an approach limits the STCs’ ability to measure the social impact of services which, inevitably, reduces opportunities for developing effective and sustainable services. Before embedding the measurement framework developed from this research, the STCs require significant overhaul to ensure their purpose and direction are clear. Although significant overhaul is required before implementing the SIM framework, research findings contributed to the development of a rehabilitative environment model that identifies the measurement factors contributing to positive outcomes for children and young people

    Building Better Opportunities: Working Progress - Final Report 2019 – 2023 (Phase 2)

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    Northamptonshire has a mixture of rural and urban areas, with several issues that need attention, including support for an ageing population, poverty, health, and well-being (Paterson-Young, Hazenberg, and Brylka, 2017). A key problem that affects Northamptonshire is the relatively high level of unemployment among individuals who are categorised as economically active. Unemployment, especially long-term unemployment, significantly impacts on an individual’s life (Eden and Aviram, 1993; Meyers and Houssemand, 2010). This report presents the results from the Phase 2 research evaluating BBO Working Progress programme between August 2019 (the beginning of the evaluation) and January 2023 (the end). BBO Working Progress aims to help unemployed and economically inactive adults across Northamptonshire gain training, education, volunteering opportunities, and employment. The research evaluation outlines the experiences of programme participants and delivery partners, using a mixed method approach complemented by the Social Impact Matrix©. Quantitative data, through online questionnaires, captured the responses of 568 programme participants on the psychological benefits, in particular self-efficacy and well-being, and employment benefits of the programme. Further quantitative data was collected from 47 programme participants, delivery partners and other organisations on the consequences of Covid-19 on BBO Working Progress. Qualitative data consisted of 67 semi-structured interviews with participants, delivery partners, and external stakeholders focused on the needs of programme participants and the programme performance

    Pathways for Recovery Interim report (January 2023)

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    This interim report presents the results from the research evaluating the Pathways for Recovery programme (from July 2022 to December 2022) which aims to help those most disadvantaged in our communities due to the impact of COVID-19. Specifically, it helps job seekers and inactive people, including long term unemployed and people far from the labour market who need support to get themselves back into employment.<br/

    Building Better Opportunities: Working Progress - Final Report 2019 – 2023 (Phase 2)

    Get PDF
    Northamptonshire has a mixture of rural and urban areas, with several issues that need attention, including support for an ageing population, poverty, health, and well-being (Paterson-Young, Hazenberg, and Brylka, 2017). A key problem that affects Northamptonshire is the relatively high level of unemployment among individuals who are categorised as economically active. Unemployment, especially long-term unemployment, significantly impacts on an individual’s life (Eden and Aviram, 1993; Meyers and Houssemand, 2010). This report presents the results from the Phase 2 research evaluating BBO Working Progress programme between August 2019 (the beginning of the evaluation) and January 2023 (the end). BBO Working Progress aims to help unemployed and economically inactive adults across Northamptonshire gain training, education, volunteering opportunities, and employment. The research evaluation outlines the experiences of programme participants and delivery partners, using a mixed method approach complemented by the Social Impact Matrix©. Quantitative data, through online questionnaires, captured the responses of 568 programme participants on the psychological benefits, in particular self-efficacy and well-being, and employment benefits of the programme. Further quantitative data was collected from 47 programme participants, delivery partners and other organisations on the consequences of Covid-19 on BBO Working Progress. Qualitative data consisted of 67 semi-structured interviews with participants, delivery partners, and external stakeholders focused on the needs of programme participants and the programme performance

    Contextualizing resilience in young people:The use of Child and Youth Resilience Measure Revised and interviews in a mixed method approach

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    PurposeThis paper seeks to understand the role of an innovative Employability Programme on developing the resilience of young people Not in Education Training or Employment (NEET).MethodThrough a mixed-method approach, this paper explores the individual, contextual, and social aspects that impact on individual resilience. Combining the Child and Youth Resilience Measure-Revised (CYRM-R) with qualitative interviews allows for the investigation of how context, relationships, and support shape young people’s resilience offering a holistic approach. ResultsThe quantitative results reveal a significant association between higher levels of resilience and factors such as school attendance and living in areas with lower crime rates. Lower resilience is observed among individuals experiencing higher levels of deprivation. Qualitative findings shed light on the multifaceted nature of resilience, highlighting its connection to community and society (sub-themes: education and employment, external pressure, support and access to services) as well as individual and psychological aspects (sub-themes: managing stressful situations and bouncing back). DiscussionThese findings emphasize that resilience is not a static or one-dimensional process dependent on a single factor, it is a dynamic and ongoing process influenced by multiple factors. The interactions between young people and families, friends, education providers, and other service providers play a crucial role in promoting resilience. ConclusionOverall, this research aids our understanding of how connections between all these levels can boost or limit individual resilience. It can help practitioners and policymakers understand how tailored activities, accounting for multiple aspects, are able to improve individual resilience

    Pathways for Recovery Interim report (January 2023)

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    This interim report presents the results from the research evaluating the Pathways for Recovery programme (from July 2022 to December 2022) which aims to help those most disadvantaged in our communities due to the impact of COVID-19. Specifically, it helps job seekers and inactive people, including long term unemployed and people far from the labour market who need support to get themselves back into employment.<br/

    ‘…staff here are just dropped in the deep end’- The impact of roles on communication and supervisor support in youth custody

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    Staff experience in youth custody are often categorised by strains, which are affected by communication and support. This research explores the association between staff roles, within a Secure Training Centre in the England, and the levels of communication and support. It enhances our understanding of the challenges faced by staff members working with young people in custodial settings and how levels of communication and support are dictated by staff roles. Through questionnaires ( N = 74) and interviews ( N = 15) with staff, statistically significant relationship between staff role and levels of communication and support was identified. Through triangulation, this article illustrates the effectiveness of the job demands–resources model in understanding staff experiences with communication and supervisory support in youth custody. It has wide-ranging implications by providing sociologists with an effective model for understanding job satisfaction and stress and by providing policy-makers and organisations delivering custodial services an understanding of the communication and support required to reduce stress and turnover
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