37 research outputs found

    LEIR Commissioning

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    The Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) is a central piece of the injector chain for LHC ion operation, transforming long Linac 3 pulses into high density bunches needed for LHC. LEIR commissioning is scheduled to be completed at the time of the conference. A review of LEIR commissioning highlighting expected and unexpected problems and actions to tackle them will be given

    Beam dynamics in the muon front end of a neutrino factory

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    The general concept of the neutrino factory is discussed and the fundamental tools in accelerator physics are introduced. The beam dynamics in the muon front end is extensively discussed with particular attention to the application of concepts like RF phase rotation, magnetic bunch compression, bunching and ionization cooling. Examples of front end designs based on these methods are presented

    Layout of the MICE Demonstration of Muon Ionization Cooling

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    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavour at the Neutrino Factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate muon ionization cooling, the technique proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization-cooling channel, the muon beam traverses a material (the absorber) loosing energy, which is replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). The configuration of MICE required to deliver the demonstration of ionization cooling is presently being prepared in parallel to the execution of a programme designed to measure the cooling properties of liquid-hydrogen and lithium hydride (Step IV). The design of this final cooling demonstration will be presented together with a summary of the performance of each of its components and the cooling performance of the experiment.Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elu- cidate the physics of flavour at the Neutrino Factory and to provide multi-TeV lepton-antilepton collisions at the Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Exper- iment (MICE) will demonstrate muon ionization cooling, the technique proposed to reduce the phase-space volume oc- cupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization- cooling channel, the muon beam traverses a material (the ab- sorber) loosing energy, which is replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). The configuration of MICE required to deliver the demonstration of ionization cooling was prepared in parallel to the execution of a programme de- signed to measure the cooling properties of liquid-hydrogen and lithium hydride (Step IV). The design will be presented together with a summary of the projected performance of the experiment

    Slow Extraction Modelling for NIMMS Hadron Therapy Synchrotrons

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    The Next Ion Medical Machine Study (NIMMS) is an umbrella R&D programme for CERN accelerator technologies targeting advanced accelerator options for proton and light ion therapy. In collaboration with the European program HITRIplus, one area of study is slow extraction which is required to deliver a uniform beam spill for radiotherapy treatment. Several techniques use the third-order resonance to extract hadrons; these include betatron core driven extraction and radiofrequency knock-out. Flexible simulations tools using these techniques were prepared and initially benchmarked with results from the literature that used the Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS) design. The limits of the current PIMMS design were then pushed to evaluate its compatibility to deliver >10x higher intensity ion beams, and using increased extraction rates

    nuSTORM Accelerator Challenges and Opportunities

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    The nuSTORM facility uses a stored muon beam to generate a neutrino source. Muons are captured and stored in a storage ring using stochastic injection. The facility will aim to measure neutrino-nucleus scattering cross-sections with uniquely well-characterized neutrino beams; to facilitate the search for sterile neutrino and other Beyond Standard Model processes with exquisite sensitivity, and to provide a muon source that makes an excellent technology test-bed required for the development of muon beams capable of serving as a multi-TeV collider. In this paper, we describe the latest status of the development of nuSTORM, the R&D needs, and the potential for nuSTORM as a Muon Collider test facility

    A Collimation Scheme for Ions Changing Charge State in the LEIR Ring

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    Avalanche-like pressure rise and an associated decrease of the beam life-time, caused by (i) beam loss due to charge exchange interactions with rest gas molecules and (ii) electron capture from the electron beam of the electron cooler and (iii) ion impact induced outgassing, is a potential limitation for heavy ion accelerators. The vacuum system of the LEIR ring as to be upgraded to reach the dynamical vacuum pressure in the low 10-12 Torr range necessary to reach design performance. A collimation system to intercept lost ions by absorber blocks made of low beam-induced outgassing material will be installed. This paper reviews the collimation scheme and simulations of beam loss patterns around the ring

    Conceptual design and modeling of particle-matter interaction cooling systems for muon based applications

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    An ionization cooling channel is a tightly spaced lattice containing absorbers for reducing the momentum of the muon beam, rf cavities for restoring the longitudinal momentum, and strong solenoids for focusing. Such a lattice can be an essential feature for fundamental high-energy physics applications. In this paper we design, simulate, and compare four individual cooling schemes that rely on ionization cooling. We establish a scaling characterizing the impact of rf gradient limitations on the overall performance and systematically compare important lattice parameters such as the required magnetic fields and the number of cavities and absorber lengths for each cooling scenario. We discuss approaches for reducing the peak magnetic field inside the rf cavities by either increasing the lattice cell length or adopting a novel bucked-coil configuration. We numerically examine the performance of our proposed channels with two independent codes that fully incorporate all basic particle-matter-interaction physical processes

    The EMMA Non-scaling FFAG

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    The Elec­tron Model for Many Ap­pli­ca­tions (EMMA) will be the World's first non-scal­ing FFAG and is under con­struc­tion at the STFC Dares­bury Lab­o­ra­to­ry in the UK. Con­struc­tion is due for com­ple­tion in March 2010 and will be fol­lowed by com­mis­sion­ing with beam and a de­tailed ex­per­i­men­tal pro­gramme to study the func­tion­ing of this type of ac­cel­er­a­tor. This paper will give an overview of the mo­ti­va­tion for the pro­ject and de­scribe the EMMA de­sign and hard­ware. The first re­sults from com­mis­sion­ing will be pre­sent­ed in a sep­a­rate paper

    Ions for LHC: Beam Physics and Engineering Challenges

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    The first phase of the heavy ion physics program at the LHC aims to provide lead-lead collisions at energies of 5.5 TeV per colliding nucleon pair and ion-ion luminosity of 1027 cm-2s-1. The transformation of CERN’s ion injector complex (Linac3-LEIR-PS-SPS) presents a number of beam physics and engineering challenges, which are described in this paper. In the LHC itself, there are fundamental performance limitations due to various beam loss mechanisms. To study these without risk of damage there will be an initial period of operation with a reduced number of nominal intensity bunches. While reducing the work required to commission the LHC with ions in 2008, this will still enable early physics discoveries
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