5,685 research outputs found

    ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATORY REFORM: DISCUSSION

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    Environmental Economics and Policy,

    THE ROLE OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT DECISIONS: THE CASE OF SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT

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    The issue of solid waste management has risen to national prominence in the last decade, fueled by increasing waste disposal costs and changing public attitudes. This situation presents a major opportunity for economists to use their applied microeconomics skills to assist state and local governments manage waste in a cost effective fashion. While findings from formal research efforts may ultimately make their way into the decision-making process, perhaps economists can play an even more significant role in emphasizing the importance of the most basic economic concepts and principles for sound decision making in solid waste management or the many other areas in which local public choices are made. These areas would include at least the following: opportunity cost, marginal analysis of costs and benefits, and the role of economic incentives.Public Economics,

    EXPLAINING RURAL HOUSEHOLD PARTICIPATION IN RECYCLING

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    Rising landfill costs have forced solid waste managers to consider waste stream reduction alternatives such as household recycling. Explaining the factors which motivate households to recycle is important to regions where households must bear a large portion of the recycling cost because unit-based garbage disposal fees and curbside recycling are not feasible options. Empirical results indicate that residents are responsive to constraints introduced by the household production technology, such as time costs and storage space, but are not responsive to variables measuring a recycling promotional program. Promotion efforts should switch focus from broader "public good" benefits of recycling to reducing household-level household production constraints.Dropoff recycling, Household recycling participation, Rural regions, Environmental Economics and Policy,

    GENERATION OF RECYCLABLES BY RURAL HOUSEHOLDS

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    Rising landfill costs have forced solid waste managers to consider ways to reduce the waste stream. Using survey data, models explaining the weight of recyclables generated by households are estimated for paper and glass. Results indicate that households respond to the time cost of recycling paper but not glass. The waste generation models imply total monthly willingness to pay for recycling is $5.78 per household. Waste managers may increase the weight of recycled waste stream with programs which lower perceived time costs of nonrecyclers and improve the efficiency of recyclers.Consumer/Household Economics, Environmental Economics and Policy,

    ESTIMATING EXTERNAL COSTS OF MUNICIPAL LANDFILL SITING THROUGH CONTINGENT VALUATION ANALYSIS: A CASE STUDY

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    Much of the solid waste stream in the United States is generated by metropolitan areas, while associated landfills are often located in adjacent rural communities. Landfill disposal of municipal solid waste often creates external costs to nearby residents. Contingent valuation was used to estimate external costs of siting a landfill in the Carter community of Knox County, Tennessee. Estimates of annual external costs were 227perhousehold.Householdincome,size,yearsinthecommunity,anddistancefromtheproposedlandfillandtherespondentseducation,sex,andperceptionofhealthriskswereimportantindeterminingahouseholdswillingnesstopaytoavoidhavingalandfillintheCartercommunity.Also,householdswhosedrinkingwatersupplieswereatriskofcontaminationwerewillingtopay227 per household. Household income, size, years in the community, and distance from the proposed landfill and the respondent's education, sex, and perception of health risks were important in determining a household's willingness to pay to avoid having a landfill in the Carter community. Also, households whose drinking water supplies were at risk of contamination were willing to pay 141 more than those who used piped city water or bottled water.Public Economics,

    Measuring the Contribution of Water and Green Space Amenities to Housing Values: An Application and Comparison of Spatially-weighted Hedonic Models

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    This study estimates the influence of proximity to water bodies and park amenities on residential housing values in Knox County, Tennessee, using the hedonic price approach. Values for proximity to water bodies and parks are first estimated globally with a standard ordinary least square (OLS) model. A locally weighted regression model is then employed to investigate spatial non-stationarity and generate local estimates for individual sources of each amenity. The local model is able to capture the variability in the quality of water bodies and parks across the county, something a conventional hedonic model using OLS cannot do.Land Economics/Use,

    AN ANALYSIS OF FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH COMPOSTING BEHAVIOR AT THE HOUSEHOLD LEVEL

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    Drawing upon telephone survey data, a logit probability analysis was conducted to identify household characteristics as well as social and institutional factors associated with backyard composting of yard and food wastes. Highly significant predictors included household gardening, perception of effort required, peer influence, and a compost bin sale program.Consumer/Household Economics, Institutional and Behavioral Economics,

    Factors Associated with Backyard Composting Behavior at the Household Level

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    Communities in most states are under pressure to reduce the amount of solid waste going into landfills. Many are making efforts to encourage their citizens to practice backyard composting. A logit regression analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with backyard composting of yard and food wastes in a case study area. Sample data were obtained through a September 1997 telephone survey of 865 households residing in single-family dwellings in Knox County, Tennessee. Findings indicate that a number of variables reflecting complementary behavior, attitudes, knowledge, and peer influence were significantly related to composting behavior. Policy implications of these findings are outlined.Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,
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