22 research outputs found

    Post-COVID-19 Inflation in the Caribbean

    Get PDF
    The COVID-19 pandemic was an economic shock in 2020 that led to a significant fall in aggregate demand around the world, as countries implemented different strategies (including the closure of borders) to slow the spread of the disease. The following year saw economies begin to reopen as restrictions were lifted, following widespread distribution of COVID-19 vaccines, and a reduction in mortality rates

    Economic Survey of the Caribbean 2021

    Get PDF
    This survey examines the economic performance of economies of the Caribbean in 2020 and the first few months of 2021 and comprises five chapters. The first chapter gives an overview of global, regional and subregional economic performance in the Caribbean. The second provides an analysis of the subregion’s fiscal performance and debt burden. The third looks at monetary policy and their impacts. The fourth is focused on the external sector, while the fifth concludes

    Economic Survey of the Caribbean 2022

    Get PDF
    This survey examines the economic performance of economies of the Caribbean in 2021 and the first few months of 2022 and comprises five chapters. The first chapter gives an overview of global, regional and subregional economic performance in the Caribbean. The second provides an analysis of the subregion’s fiscal performance and debt burden. The third looks at monetary policy and their impacts. The fourth is focused on the external sector, while the fifth concludes.Abstract .-- I. Global and subregional performance .-- II. Fiscal and debt performance .-- III. Monetary Policy and Prices .-- IV. External sector developments .-- V. Conclusion

    Preliminary overview of the economies of the Caribbean 2021–2022

    Get PDF
    This overview examines the economic performance of economies of the Caribbean in 2021 and comprises four chapters. The first chapter provides a comparative analysis across Caribbean economies of the main macroeconomic variables, namely GDP growth, monetary indicators, as well as fiscal and external accounts. The second chapter concludes, while the annex includes individual country briefs that give an overview of the economic situation for the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, and a subregional assessment of the countries of the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union.Abstract .-- Introduction .--- I. Macroeconomic performance. A. Fiscal and debt. B. Monetary policy, domestic credit and inflation. C. External sector .-- II. Conclusion

    Preliminary overview of the economies of the Caribbean 2020–2021

    Get PDF
    This overview examines the economic performance of economies of the Caribbean in 2020 and comprises four chapters. The first chapter provides a comparative analysis across Caribbean economies of the main macroeconomic variables, namely GDP growth, monetary indicators, as well as fiscal and external accounts. The second chapter looks at areas of focus in the Caribbean. The third chapter concludes, while the annex includes individual country briefs that give an overview of the economic situation for the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica, Suriname and a subregional assessment of the countries of the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union.Abstract .-- Introduction .-- I Macroeconomic performance. A. Fiscal and debt. B. Monetary policy, domestic credit and inflation. C. External sector .-- II. Conclusion

    Preliminary overview of the economies of the Caribbean 2012-2013

    Get PDF
    Includes bibliographyIn the face of weak global growth in major export markets the Caribbean economies have underperformed. The situation is much more severe among service producers1 which have suffered the decline in tourist arrivals and offshore banking services. The goods producers have benefited from the commodity boom and have tended to show more robust growth. The expectations for 2013 are that growth will be positive in the region with the service producers growing at 1.5per cent and the goods producers at 3.6per cent. This performance will depend heavily on improved performances in the major export markets. The fiscal policy stance in most countries in the region in 2012 tended to be expansionary with the average deficit increasing from 3.1 per cent of GDP to 3.4 per cent. The economic structure was an indicator of fiscal health as the service producers had greater deficits. The central challenge on the fiscal side in the region is the large debt problem. Between 2011 and 2012 the average debt burden increased marginally from 64.2per cent of GDP to 65.5per cent of GDP and in a few cases the debt burden was in excess of 100 per cent of GDP. This situation calls for a consistent attempt at fiscal consolidation over the medium term. With respect to monetary policy, the stance was mostly neutral given sluggish demand and stable prices. In a few cases, lending rates trended down slightly but deposit rates also declined and money supply remained practically constant. At the same time, domestic credit to both the private and public sector remained unchanged and the private sector remained risk averse. Inflation trends in 2012 were mixed but overall inflation remained relatively low. The current account balance which is a source of growing concern, increased due to rising imports and sluggish exports. Elevated commodity prices helped to keep the cost of imports high .In terms of the financial and capital accounts, there was an increase in FDI inflows to the subregion but much of this was outside of the tourism sector

    Regional integration in the Caribbean: The role of trade agreements and structural transformation

    Get PDF
    Despite having relatively open economies and a dedicated strategic focus on export expansion, Caribbean economies still account for a small proportion of global trade (goods and services). This paper therefore posits that the subregion adopt a new dais of regional integration, which favours deeper trade and economic integration with countries which are the region’s natural trading partners

    Promoting debt sustainability to facilitate financing sustainable development in selected Caribbean countries: A scenario analysis of the ECLAC debt for climate adaptation swap initiative

    Get PDF
    In light of the high debt burden impacting Caribbean economies ECLAC has been pursuing an initiative designed to reduce the debt burden and advance sustainable development. The strategy has evolved over time and there is now agreement on an approach designed to bring financial resources to the Caribbean for resilience building while still emphasizing the importance of debt reduction. To address resilience and development financing, ECLAC proposes the establishment of a Caribbean Resilience Facility to be housed at a reputable financial institution. Such a facility would be capitalised by donors, including the GCF, wishing to assist in financing climate projects and other forms of resilience-building activities within the Caribbean.Abstract .-- Introduction .-- I. Study objectives and procedure .-- II. Results for debt reduction scenario analysis .-- III. Conclusion

    Preliminary overview of the economies of the Caribbean 2017–2018

    Get PDF
    The report provides an overview of the economic performance for 2017 of the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago plus the eight Member States of the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union (ECCU), and the outlook for 2018. Data were collected from a review of reports from subregional institutions as well as national governments and interviews with government officials in each of the countries examined.Abstract .-- Introduction .-- I. Macroeconomic policy .-- II. The external sector .-- III. Conclusion .-- IV. Country notes. Bahamas. Barbados. Belize. Eastern Caribbean Currency Union. Guyana. Jamaica. Suriname. Trinidad and Tobago

    Economic Survey of the Caribbean 2013: Improved economic performance with reduced downside risks

    Get PDF
    Includes bibliography.This survey posits that improving global prospects especially in the United States and Europe will mean opportunities for positive growth in the Caribbean due to increasing exports and renewed inflows from foregin direct investment and remittances. It points out that the response of the Caribbean economies to the global crisis has been asymmetric with the goods1 producing economies doing better than the service producing economies with respect to growth and their public finances. On the latter issue the region faces severe challenges as debt to GDP ratios in some countries are in excess of 100per cent. Such high debt burdens impact growth negatively through many channels. Among these are the upward pressure placed on domestic interest rates, and the decline in government capital spending which is often complementary to private investment. The survey also notes that the domestic private sector still remains risk averse and this together with depressed foreign direct investment has not promoted robust investment in the region, except for a few countries. For these reasons it suggests that private /public sector partnerships are a useful vehicle for jump starting private investment and allowing for investment to continue. In addition, with limited public resources available , such partnership allow some public functions to be pursued. The outlook for 2012 and 2013 is for modest overall growth in the subregion and this is contingent on improved demand in major export markets over this period leading to increased domestic investment and employment
    corecore