18 research outputs found

    Determination of neutrino mass ordering from Supernova neutrinos with T2HK and DUNE

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    In this paper we study the possibility of determining the neutrino mass ordering from the future supernova neutrino events at the DUNE and T2HK detectors. We estimate the expected number of neutrino event rates from a future supernova explosion assuming GKVM flux model corresponding to different processes that are responsible for detecting the supernova neutrinos at these detectors. We present our results in the form of χ2\chi^2, as a function of supernova distance. For a systematic uncertainty of 5\%, our results show that, the neutrino mass ordering can be determined at 5 σ5 ~\sigma C.L. if the supernova explosion occurs at a distance of 44 kpc for T2HK and at a distance of 6.5 kpc for DUNE. Our results also show that the sensitivity of T2HK gets affected by the systematic uncertainties for the smaller supernova distances. Further, we show that in both DUNE and T2HK, the sensitivity gets deteriorated to some extent due to presence of energy smearing of the neutrino events. This occurs because of the reconstruction of the neutrino energy from the energy-momentum measurement of the outgoing leptons at the detector.Comment: 19 pages, 7 figure

    Type III seesaw under A4A_4 modular symmetry with leptogenesis and muon g−2g-2

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    We make an attempt to study neutrino phenomenology in the framework of type-III seesaw by considering A4A_4 modular symmetry in the super-symmetric context. In addition, we have included local U(1)B−LU(1)_{B-L} symmetry which eventually helps us to avoid certain unwanted terms in the superpotential. Hitherto, the seesaw being type-III, it involves the fermion triplet superfields ÎŁ\Sigma, along with which, we have included a singlet weighton field (ρ)(\rho). In here, modular symmetry plays a crucial role by avoiding the usage of excess flavon (weighton) fields. Also, the Yukawa couplings acquire modular forms which are expressed in terms of Dedekind eta function η(τ)\eta(\tau). However, for numerical analysis we use qq expansion expressions of these couplings. Therefore, the model discussed here is triumphant enough to accommodate the observed neutrino oscillation data. Additionally, it also successfully explains leptogenesis and sheds some light on the current results of muon (g−2g-2).Comment: 23 pages, 15 figure

    Neutrino phenomenology, muon and electron (g-2) under U(1)U(1) gauged symmetries in an extended inverse seesaw model

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    The proposed work is an extension of the Standard Model, where we have introduced two anomaly free gauge symmetries i.e. U(1)B−LU(1)_{B-L} and U(1)Le−LÎŒU(1)_{L_e-L_\mu} in an inverse seesaw framework. For this purpose, we have included three right handed neutrinos NiRN_{iR}, three neutral fermions SiL(i=1,2,3)S_{iL} (i=1,2,3) and two scalar singlet bosons (χ1,χ2\chi_1,\chi_2). We get a definite structure for neutrino mass matrix due to the aforementioned gauge symmetries. Thus, our model is able to predict the neutrino oscillation results which are in accordance with the experimental data and mostly supports normal ordering. The outcome comprises of active neutrino mass, mixing angles, mass square differences, CP violating phase etc. We also discuss neutrinoless double beta decay effective mass parameter ⟹mee⟩\langle m_{ee}\rangle which gives a strong evidence on the Majorana nature of neutrinos. Its predicted value is found to be well below the current experimental bounds of KamLAND-Zen, CUORE etc. Furthermore, as the extended gauge symmetries are local, hence, are associated with the corresponding gauge bosons i.e. (Z1,Z2Z_1, Z_2), which make our model feasible to explain current results of electron and muon (g−2)(g-2) through neutral current interactions.Comment: 22 pages, 24 figure

    Exploring models with modular symmetry in neutrino oscillation experiments

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    Abstract Our study aims to investigate the viability of neutrino mass models that arise from discrete non-Abelian modular symmetry groups, i.e., Γ N with (N = 1, 2, 3, . . . ) in the future neutrino experiments T2HK, DUNE, and JUNO. Modular symmetry reduces the usage of flavon fields compared to the conventional discrete flavor symmetry models. Theories based on modular symmetries predict the values of leptonic mixing parameters, and therefore, these models can be tested in future neutrino experiments. In this study, we consider three models based on the A 4 modular symmetry, i.e., Model-A, B, and C such a way that they predict different values of the oscillation parameters but still allowed with respect to the current data. In the future, it is expected that T2HK, DUNE, and JUNO will measure the neutrino oscillation parameters very precisely, and therefore, some of these models can be excluded in the future by these experiments. We have estimated the prediction of these models numerically and then used them as input to scrutinize these models in the neutrino experiments. Assuming the future best-fit values of Ξ 23 and ÎŽ CP remain the same as the current one, our results show that at 5σ C.L, Model-A can be excluded by T2HK whereas Model-B can be excluded by both T2HK and DUNE. Model-C cannot be excluded by T2HK and DUNE at 5σ C.L. Further; our results show that JUNO alone can exclude Model-B at an extremely high confidence level if the future best-fit of Ξ 12 remains at the current-one. We have also identified the region in the Ξ 23 - ÎŽ CP parameter space, for which Model-A cannot be separated from Model-B in T2HK and DUNE

    CEPC Technical Design Report -- Accelerator

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    International audienceThe Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) is a large scientific project initiated and hosted by China, fostered through extensive collaboration with international partners. The complex comprises four accelerators: a 30 GeV Linac, a 1.1 GeV Damping Ring, a Booster capable of achieving energies up to 180 GeV, and a Collider operating at varying energy modes (Z, W, H, and ttbar). The Linac and Damping Ring are situated on the surface, while the Booster and Collider are housed in a 100 km circumference underground tunnel, strategically accommodating future expansion with provisions for a Super Proton Proton Collider (SPPC). The CEPC primarily serves as a Higgs factory. In its baseline design with synchrotron radiation (SR) power of 30 MW per beam, it can achieve a luminosity of 5e34 /cm^2/s^1, resulting in an integrated luminosity of 13 /ab for two interaction points over a decade, producing 2.6 million Higgs bosons. Increasing the SR power to 50 MW per beam expands the CEPC's capability to generate 4.3 million Higgs bosons, facilitating precise measurements of Higgs coupling at sub-percent levels, exceeding the precision expected from the HL-LHC by an order of magnitude. This Technical Design Report (TDR) follows the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (Pre-CDR, 2015) and the Conceptual Design Report (CDR, 2018), comprehensively detailing the machine's layout and performance, physical design and analysis, technical systems design, R&D and prototyping efforts, and associated civil engineering aspects. Additionally, it includes a cost estimate and a preliminary construction timeline, establishing a framework for forthcoming engineering design phase and site selection procedures. Construction is anticipated to begin around 2027-2028, pending government approval, with an estimated duration of 8 years. The commencement of experiments could potentially initiate in the mid-2030s

    CEPC Technical Design Report -- Accelerator

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    International audienceThe Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) is a large scientific project initiated and hosted by China, fostered through extensive collaboration with international partners. The complex comprises four accelerators: a 30 GeV Linac, a 1.1 GeV Damping Ring, a Booster capable of achieving energies up to 180 GeV, and a Collider operating at varying energy modes (Z, W, H, and ttbar). The Linac and Damping Ring are situated on the surface, while the Booster and Collider are housed in a 100 km circumference underground tunnel, strategically accommodating future expansion with provisions for a Super Proton Proton Collider (SPPC). The CEPC primarily serves as a Higgs factory. In its baseline design with synchrotron radiation (SR) power of 30 MW per beam, it can achieve a luminosity of 5e34 /cm^2/s^1, resulting in an integrated luminosity of 13 /ab for two interaction points over a decade, producing 2.6 million Higgs bosons. Increasing the SR power to 50 MW per beam expands the CEPC's capability to generate 4.3 million Higgs bosons, facilitating precise measurements of Higgs coupling at sub-percent levels, exceeding the precision expected from the HL-LHC by an order of magnitude. This Technical Design Report (TDR) follows the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (Pre-CDR, 2015) and the Conceptual Design Report (CDR, 2018), comprehensively detailing the machine's layout and performance, physical design and analysis, technical systems design, R&D and prototyping efforts, and associated civil engineering aspects. Additionally, it includes a cost estimate and a preliminary construction timeline, establishing a framework for forthcoming engineering design phase and site selection procedures. Construction is anticipated to begin around 2027-2028, pending government approval, with an estimated duration of 8 years. The commencement of experiments could potentially initiate in the mid-2030s

    CEPC Technical Design Report -- Accelerator

    No full text
    International audienceThe Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) is a large scientific project initiated and hosted by China, fostered through extensive collaboration with international partners. The complex comprises four accelerators: a 30 GeV Linac, a 1.1 GeV Damping Ring, a Booster capable of achieving energies up to 180 GeV, and a Collider operating at varying energy modes (Z, W, H, and ttbar). The Linac and Damping Ring are situated on the surface, while the Booster and Collider are housed in a 100 km circumference underground tunnel, strategically accommodating future expansion with provisions for a Super Proton Proton Collider (SPPC). The CEPC primarily serves as a Higgs factory. In its baseline design with synchrotron radiation (SR) power of 30 MW per beam, it can achieve a luminosity of 5e34 /cm^2/s^1, resulting in an integrated luminosity of 13 /ab for two interaction points over a decade, producing 2.6 million Higgs bosons. Increasing the SR power to 50 MW per beam expands the CEPC's capability to generate 4.3 million Higgs bosons, facilitating precise measurements of Higgs coupling at sub-percent levels, exceeding the precision expected from the HL-LHC by an order of magnitude. This Technical Design Report (TDR) follows the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (Pre-CDR, 2015) and the Conceptual Design Report (CDR, 2018), comprehensively detailing the machine's layout and performance, physical design and analysis, technical systems design, R&D and prototyping efforts, and associated civil engineering aspects. Additionally, it includes a cost estimate and a preliminary construction timeline, establishing a framework for forthcoming engineering design phase and site selection procedures. Construction is anticipated to begin around 2027-2028, pending government approval, with an estimated duration of 8 years. The commencement of experiments could potentially initiate in the mid-2030s
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