14 research outputs found

    Impact of particle size of ingredients in compounded diets on pellet stability and performance in Penaeus indicus H. Milne Edwards

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    The impact of particle size of ingredients in a research diet and a practical feed in the water stability of pellets. Their digestibility, growth, and food conversion ratio in the prawn Penaeus ;ndicus were investigated. The research diet consisted of casein, code liver oil, sucrose, starch, cellulose and other additives while the practical feed was made up of prawn waste mantis shrimp (Squilla), fish meal, groundnut oil cake and tapioca. Casein in the research diet and prawn waste, mantis shrimp, and groundnut oil cake in the practical feed were prepared into panicles of 500, 420,300,250,2 10, 100, and 50 gm and dry pellets were prepared with ingredients in each size

    Aluminium induced physiological and biochemical changes in freshwater fish Cyprinus carpio Var.Communis

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    Qualitative aspects of toxicology are important because they are fundamental to the safety evaluation process in which, one first determines the toxicologic profile of the substance and then establishes how the chemical can be employed safely to prevent injury (Plaa, 1982). According to Durham (1974), toxicity is the ability of a chemical molecule or compound to produce injury once it reaches susceptible site which is determined by the dosage. Cairns (1984) reported that from a regulatory point of view, toxicity tests are used for three major purposes; they are 1. screening of chemicals and products, ii. establishing limits and iii. monitoring; the author further stated that bioassay test can be used to establish the maximum acceptable concentration of a pollutant in a given environment without deliberate application of the chemical causing any unfavourable biological consequences

    Holding and spawning of the edible oyster Crassostrea madrasensis during off season

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    Production of seed from the hatchery throughout the year would help to undertake stocking in the grow out systems at appropriate time which may vary in different areas. Ripe oysters with a size range of 70-120 mm were collected from Korampallam creek near Tuticorin. Thus holding the ripe oysters is a promising line of work for getting spawn in the hatchery outside the spawning period, leading to seed production throughout the year

    Microalgal species as feed for conditioning adult oyster Crassostrea madrasensis (Preston)

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    The rate of removal of different microalgal cells in suspension at specific time interval in respect of six species differing in sizes such as Tetraselmis sp, Cheatoceros sp, Chlorella sp, Dicrataria sp., Isochrys sp, Chromulina sp, by Crassostrea madrasensis has been studied. The study revealed that often exhibit a signifiant degree of selectivity in the rate of filtration of certain algae. Further it is recorded that the filtration rate is not uniform throughout the experimental period of 24 hours. Oysters showed periods of high filtering activity and periods of relative quiescence

    Characterisation of tropical reservoirs in Tamil Nadu, India in terms of plankton assemblage using multivariate analysis

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    The ecological status of reservoirs in Tamil Nadu, India was studied in view of their importance in culture based fisheries. The abundance and distribution pattern of plankton assemblages with respect to important water parameters was selected to characterise the reservoirs. Sampling was carried out seasonally in 22 reservoirs widely ranging in trophic state, during 1993 to 2004. A definite distinction was observed between Western Ghats (WG), rain shadow (RS) and plain land reservoirs (PL) based on plankton communities and environmental factors analysed. Western Ghats reservoirs lying at the head stream of rivers tend to show chemically oligotrophic to mesotrophic status with characteristic dominance of phytoplankters viz., chlorophyta, Selenastrum spp., Ankistrodesmus spp., bacillariophyta, Navicula spp., Nitzshia spp. and Synedra spp. and zooplankton, rotifer, Brachionus spp. and copepod, Diaptomus spp. Eutrophic to hyper-eutrophic status with dominant presence of cyanophyta, Microcystis aeruginosa in all the seasons and lesser presence of Spirulina spp. was observed in many plain land reservoirs while others with low anthropogenic pressure were sub-dominant with bacillariophyta, Nitzshia spp., Synedra spp. and Navicula spp. and chlorophyta Scenedesmus spp. and Selenastrum spp. Blooms of Microcystis aeruginosa occurred in shallow plain reservoirs receiving agricultural, industrial and municipal run-off during monsoon. Rain shadow reservoirs depicted early eutrophy stage as estimated through Carlssons Trophic State Index, represented by species of two groups, chlorophyceae and myxophyceae, distribution being influenced mostly by habitat characteristics. Principal component analysis (PCA) suggested that secchi disc transparency and nutrients were important variables determining the ecological status of the reservoirs. The overall division of the reservoirs is explained by species environmental relationship using BIOENV (Primer 6), which described the positive correlation of temperature, specific conductivity and hardness to plankton composition and numerical abundance. Some plain reservoirs move out of their group to assume a solitary position exhibiting different plankton composition with respect to hydrological characteristics

    Indian edible oyster

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    In India pioneering attempts were made by James Hornell in 1910 in developing Oyster culture in the erstwhile Madras State. Scientific investigations were undertaken during early 70's by the Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute, at Tuticorin. The Institute has conducted R & D programmes on all aspects of Oyster farming during the last two decades, culminating in a wealth of informations on the technology of Oyster farming. The Brochure outlines various aspects of the technology of farming of the Indian Edible Oyster or the Indian Backwater Oyster Crasaostrea madrasensis (Preston} including information on biology, ecology and economics of Oyster farming

    Renaissance in Fisheries: Outlook and Strategies - Book of Abstracts 9th Indian Fisheries Forum, December 19-23, 2011, Chennai, India

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    The Asian Fisheries Society – Indian Branch (AFSIB) since its inception in 1986, has been providing a platform for discussion at the national level on issues related to research, development, education and policies by organizing Indian Fisheries Forum (IFF) every three years in different parts of the country. The 9th Indian Fisheries Forum (9th iff) will be hosted by the Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI), at Chennai during 19-23 December 2011. The main theme of the 9th iff is “Renaissance in Fisheries: Outlook & Strategies”. It would have a comprehensive look for the fisheries and aquaculture sectors, for achieving greater synergy among the stakeholders and planning strategies for capture fisheries and aquafarming to build higher levels of sustainability and profitability. The forum would also address the issues of impact of climate change and its mitigation, resource constraint and species diversification for the expansion of fish production activity; and encourage young scientists to undertake need-based and resource specific research. An international symposium sponsored by the Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem (BoBLME) is scheduled to be held during the forum on 21 December, 2011 with theme: Bay of Bengal–Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management

    Seasonal gonadal changes, spawning and condition index of oyster Crassostrea madrasensis (Preston) in the Korampallam creek, Tuticorin

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    Seanod changca in the gonad of edible oyrter Crassosma madmsensis were oberved hir- tologically in samples colleated &om Korampallam creek during February 1987 to January 1988. Two peak spawning reasons wore observed in March and September. Gametogenerir atarted in May 1987 and ripe atagea wore noticed from September 1987. Spawning occurred during Sep- tember to Ootober. A second cycle of gametogenerir began during November 1987 and higher percentage of ripe rtages were noticed during March 1987 and spawning commenced in early March. Oyaten showed 5.60% of apent stage8 with reridual eggs throughout the year except August, September. December and February. Oyden panred through indoterminate atage before the advance of gametogenesis. No hermaphrodites were observed during thin period

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    Not AvailableSeanod changca in the gonad of edible oyrter Crassosma madmsensis were oberved hir- tologically in samples colleated &om Korampallam creek during February 1987 to January 1988. Two peak spawning reasons wore observed in March and September. Gametogenerir atarted in May 1987 and ripe atagea wore noticed from September 1987. Spawning occurred during Sep- tember to Ootober. A second cycle of gametogenerir began during November 1987 and higher percentage of ripe rtages were noticed during March 1987 and spawning commenced in early March. Oyaten showed 5.60% of apent stage8 with reridual eggs throughout the year except August, September. December and February. Oyden panred through indoterminate atage before the advance of gametogenesis. No hermaphrodites were observed during thin period.Not Availabl

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    Not AvailableThe rate of removal of different microalgal cells in suspension at specific time interval in respect of six species differing in sizes such as Tetraselmis sp, Cheatoceros sp, Chlorella sp, Dicrataria sp., Isochrys sp, Chromulina sp, by Crassostrea madrasensis has been studied. The study revealed that often exhibit a signifiant degree of selectivity in the rate of filtration of certain algae. Further it is recorded that the filtration rate is not uniform throughout the experimental period of 24 hours. Oysters showed periods of high filtering activity and periods of relative quiescence.Not Availabl
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