30 research outputs found

    The ABC130 barrel module prototyping programme for the ATLAS strip tracker

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    For the Phase-II Upgrade of the ATLAS Detector, its Inner Detector, consisting of silicon pixel, silicon strip and transition radiation sub-detectors, will be replaced with an all new 100 % silicon tracker, composed of a pixel tracker at inner radii and a strip tracker at outer radii. The future ATLAS strip tracker will include 11,000 silicon sensor modules in the central region (barrel) and 7,000 modules in the forward region (end-caps), which are foreseen to be constructed over a period of 3.5 years. The construction of each module consists of a series of assembly and quality control steps, which were engineered to be identical for all production sites. In order to develop the tooling and procedures for assembly and testing of these modules, two series of major prototyping programs were conducted: an early program using readout chips designed using a 250 nm fabrication process (ABCN-25) and a subsequent program using a follow-up chip set made using 130 nm processing (ABC130 and HCC130 chips). This second generation of readout chips was used for an extensive prototyping program that produced around 100 barrel-type modules and contributed significantly to the development of the final module layout. This paper gives an overview of the components used in ABC130 barrel modules, their assembly procedure and findings resulting from their tests.Comment: 82 pages, 66 figure

    Verification of simulated ASIC functionality and radiation tolerance for the HL-LHC ATLAS ITk Strip Detector

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    ASICs are important components in many HEP detectors and their functional simulation ensures successful operation while minimizing the number of long production cycles. Three radiation-tolerant ASICs (HCC, AMAC, and ABC) will perform the front-end readout, monitoring, and control of the outer layers of the ITk Strip particle tracker for the HL-LHC ATLAS detector. Simulated verification with the Python-based cocotb framework allows for sophisticated tests with major contributions from students and firmware non-experts. The verification program includes interactions between multiple ASICs, realistic HL-LHC data flows, operational stress tests, and a focus on mitigation of disruptive Single Event Effects due to radiation

    Quality Assurance Testing of the AMAC ASIC for the HL-LHC ATLAS ITk Strip Detector

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    The high-luminosity upgrade to the LHC (HL-LHC) requires an all new inner detector, the Inner Tracker (ITk), composed of strips and pixels subsystems. The AMACStar is one of three radiation hard ASICs that will be installed on the ITk strip modules. Its function is to autonomously monitor and control the temperatures, voltages, and currents in the module components, preventing these quantities from reaching dangerous levels. A total of 18000 AMACStars are needed for the detector requirements. Wafers of these chips are probed at the University of Pennsylvania; comprehensive probe-station testing software and procedures have been developed in order to test the digital and analog functionality of every AMACStar. A detailed grading scheme is applied to determine which chips should be installed on the modules. The results from the pre-production and production priming satisfy the required 90% yield needed for production goals. Production of AMACStar will begin in 2023

    Pre-Production Testing of the HCCStar at Penn for the ATLAS ITk Detector

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    The high-luminosity LHC requires a complete overhaul of the ATLAS inner tracker subsystem, including a new silicon-strip charged-particle tracking detector. The HCCStar (Hybrid Controller Chip) is one of three new radiation-tolerant ASICs for this subsystem. As the interface to multiple binary readout ASICs for the strip detector, the HCCStar buffers and forwards controls signals and trigger and readout requests to them, and serializes their output at 640 MHz. All HCCStars undergo a suite of tests to verify their analog and digital functionality, and large statistics of performance with various operational parameters are collected

    Quality Control Testing of the HCC ASIC for the HL-LHC ATLAS ITk Strip Detector

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    The high-luminosity upgrade to the LHC requires a new silicon-strip charged-particle tracking detector for ATLAS. The HCC (Hybrid Controller Chip) is one of three new radiation-tolerant ASICs for this subsystem. As the interface to multiple binary readout ASICs for the strip detector, the HCC buffers and forwards control signals and trigger and readout requests to them, and serializes their output at 640 MHz. All HCCs undergo a suite of tests to verify their analog and digital functionality, and large statistics of performance with various operational parameters are collected. Yields of HCC ASICs exceed the 90\% required for production

    Testing of the HCC and AMAC functionality and radiation tolerance for the HL-LHC ATLAS ITk Strip Detector

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    The ITk Strip is a new silicon-strip charged-particle detector for the HL-LHC ATLAS experiment. The HCC and AMAC chip are radiation-tolerant ASICs that contribute to the front-end readout, monitoring and control of the ITk Strip. Comprehensive functionality tests have been performed on HCC and AMAC to guarantee their reliability throughout the HL-LHC lifetime. In addition, to ensure the operation of the HCC and AMAC under a radiation heavy environment, gamma, heavy ions, proton and x-ray irradiation campaigns were conducted. HCC and AMAC successfully operated at extreme conditions and were reliable at the expected HL-LHC conditions

    Irradiation testing of ASICs for the ATLAS HL-LHC upgrade

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    For the high-luminosity upgrade to the LHC, the ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced by an all-silicon tracker (ITk) consisting of two systems: pixels and strips. HCC and AMAC are ITk Strip ASICs vital for performing the system readout, monitoring, and control. To ensure these ASICs will successfully operate in the high-radiation environment of the HL-LHC, they need to be tested for radiation tolerance, and tests have been performed using both heavy ions and protons. The ASIC designs were shown to protect against radiation related effects

    The ABC130 barrel module prototyping programme for the ATLAS strip tracker

    No full text
    For the Phase-II Upgrade of the ATLAS Detector [1], its Inner Detector, consisting of silicon pixel, silicon strip and transition radiation sub-detectors, will be replaced with an all new 100% silicon tracker, composed of a pixel tracker at inner radii and a strip tracker at outer radii. The future ATLAS strip tracker will include 11,000 silicon sensor modules in the central region (barrel) and 7,000 modules in the forward region (end-caps), which are foreseen to be constructed over a period of 3.5 years. The construction of each module consists of a series of assembly and quality control steps, which were engineered to be identical for all production sites. In order to develop the tooling and procedures for assembly and testing of these modules, two series of major prototyping programs were conducted: an early program using readout chips designed using a 250 nm fabrication process (ABCN-250) [2,2] and a subsequent program using a follow-up chip set made using 130 nm processing (ABC130 and HCC130 chips). This second generation of readout chips was used for an extensive prototyping program that produced around 100 barrel-type modules and contributed significantly to the development of the final module layout. This paper gives an overview of the components used in ABC130 barrel modules, their assembly procedure and findings resulting from their tests

    The DUNE Far Detector Vertical Drift Technology, Technical Design Report

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    International audienceDUNE is an international experiment dedicated to addressing some of the questions at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics, including the mystifying preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe. The dual-site experiment will employ an intense neutrino beam focused on a near and a far detector as it aims to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to make high-precision measurements of the PMNS matrix parameters, including the CP-violating phase. It will also stand ready to observe supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector implements liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) technology, and combines the many tens-of-kiloton fiducial mass necessary for rare event searches with the sub-centimeter spatial resolution required to image those events with high precision. The addition of a photon detection system enhances physics capabilities for all DUNE physics drivers and opens prospects for further physics explorations. Given its size, the far detector will be implemented as a set of modules, with LArTPC designs that differ from one another as newer technologies arise. In the vertical drift LArTPC design, a horizontal cathode bisects the detector, creating two stacked drift volumes in which ionization charges drift towards anodes at either the top or bottom. The anodes are composed of perforated PCB layers with conductive strips, enabling reconstruction in 3D. Light-trap-style photon detection modules are placed both on the cryostat's side walls and on the central cathode where they are optically powered. This Technical Design Report describes in detail the technical implementations of each subsystem of this LArTPC that, together with the other far detector modules and the near detector, will enable DUNE to achieve its physics goals

    The DUNE Far Detector Vertical Drift Technology, Technical Design Report

    No full text
    International audienceDUNE is an international experiment dedicated to addressing some of the questions at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics, including the mystifying preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe. The dual-site experiment will employ an intense neutrino beam focused on a near and a far detector as it aims to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to make high-precision measurements of the PMNS matrix parameters, including the CP-violating phase. It will also stand ready to observe supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector implements liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) technology, and combines the many tens-of-kiloton fiducial mass necessary for rare event searches with the sub-centimeter spatial resolution required to image those events with high precision. The addition of a photon detection system enhances physics capabilities for all DUNE physics drivers and opens prospects for further physics explorations. Given its size, the far detector will be implemented as a set of modules, with LArTPC designs that differ from one another as newer technologies arise. In the vertical drift LArTPC design, a horizontal cathode bisects the detector, creating two stacked drift volumes in which ionization charges drift towards anodes at either the top or bottom. The anodes are composed of perforated PCB layers with conductive strips, enabling reconstruction in 3D. Light-trap-style photon detection modules are placed both on the cryostat's side walls and on the central cathode where they are optically powered. This Technical Design Report describes in detail the technical implementations of each subsystem of this LArTPC that, together with the other far detector modules and the near detector, will enable DUNE to achieve its physics goals
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