90 research outputs found

    The Role of the Proprietary Hospital

    Get PDF

    Comment: More Tales FromInstitutional Review Boards

    Get PDF

    Comment: More Tales FromInstitutional Review Boards

    Get PDF

    Commentary: Medical Technology Assessment as Social Responsibility

    Get PDF

    Commentary: Medical Technology Assessment as Social Responsibility

    Get PDF

    The Role of the Proprietary Hospital

    Full text link

    Five main processes in healthcare: a citizen perspective

    Get PDF
    A citizen point of view on the healthcare system, its processes and their improvement is emphasised. From this point of view, five main processes are identified: Keeping Healthy, Detecting Health Problems, Diagnosing Diseases, Treating Diseases and Providing for a Good End of Life. The citizen should be looked upon as a cocreator of value and improvement of these processes

    Patient satisfaction, feasibility and reliability of satisfaction questionnaire among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in urban Uganda: a cross-sectional study

    Get PDF
    <p>Abstract</p> <p>Background</p> <p>A comprehensive understanding of the barriers to and facilitators of poor tuberculosis (TB) treatment outcome is still lacking; posing a major obstacle to finding effective solutions. Assessment of patient satisfaction in TB programs would contribute to the understanding of gaps in healthcare delivery and the specific needs of individual patients. However, tools for assessing patient satisfaction are lacking.</p> <p>Objective</p> <p>To establish patient satisfaction, the feasibility and reliability of a questionnaire for healthcare service satisfaction and a questionnaire for satisfaction with information received about TB medicines among adult TB patients attending public and private program clinics in Kampala, Uganda.</p> <p>Methods</p> <p>In a cross-sectional study, we recruited 133 patients of known HIV status and confirmed pulmonary TB receiving care at the public and private hospitals in Kampala, Uganda. Participants were enrolled based on length of TB treatment as follows: starting therapy, completed two months of therapy, and completed eight months of therapy. A translated and standardized 13-item patient healthcare service satisfaction questionnaire (PS-13) and the Satisfaction with Information about Medicines Scale (SIMS) tool were administered by trained interviewers. Factor analysis was used to systematically group the PS-13 questionnaire into three factors of technical quality of care, responsiveness to patient preference, and management of patient preference satisfaction subscales. The SIMS tool was analyzed with two subscales of information about the action and usage of medication and the potential problems with medication.</p> <p>Results</p> <p>Of the 133 participants, 35% (46/133) were starting, 33% (44/133) had completed two months, and 32% (43/133) had completed eight months of TB therapy. The male to female and public to private hospital ratios in the study population were 1:1. The PS-13 and the SIMS tools were highly acceptable and easily administered. Both scales and the subscales demonstrated acceptable internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha above 0.70. Patients that were enrolled at the public hospital had relatively lower PS-13 satisfaction scores (0.48 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.42 - 0.52)), (0.86 (95% CI, 0.81 - 0.90)) for technical quality of care and responsiveness to patient preferences, respectively compared to patients that were enrolled at the private hospital. For potential problems SIMS subscale, male patients that were recruited at the public hospital had relatively lower satisfaction scores (0.58 (95% CI, 0.40 - 0.86)) compared to female patients after adjusting for other factors. Similarly, patients that had completed eight months of TB treatment had relatively higher satisfaction scores (1.23 (95% CI, 1.06 - 1.44)) for action and usage SIMS subscale, and higher satisfaction scores (1.09 (95% CI, 1.03 - 1.16)) for management of patient preference (PS-13 satisfaction subscale) compared to patients that were starting treatment, respectively.</p> <p>Conclusion</p> <p>The study provides preliminary evidence that the PS-13 service satisfaction and the SIMS tools are reliable measures of patient satisfaction in TB programs. Satisfaction score findings suggest differences in patient satisfaction levels between public and private hospitals; between patients starting and those completing TB therapy.</p

    Feasibility, reliability and validity of health-related quality of life questionnaire among adult pulmonary tuberculosis patients in urban Uganda: cross-sectional study

    Get PDF
    <p>Abstract</p> <p>Background</p> <p>Despite the availability of standard instruments for evaluating health-related quality life (HRQoL), the feasibility, reliability, and validity of such instruments among tuberculosis (TB) patients in different populations of sub-Saharan Africa where TB burden is of concern, is still lacking.</p> <p>Objective</p> <p>We established the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the Medical Outcomes Survey (MOS) in assessing HRQoL among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Kampala, Uganda.</p> <p>Methods</p> <p>In a cross-sectional study, 133 patients with known HIV status and confirmed pulmonary TB disease were recruited from one public and one private hospital. Participants were enrolled based on duration of TB treatment according to the following categories: starting therapy, two months of therapy, and eight completed months of therapy. A translated and culturally adapted standardized 35-item MOS instrument was administered by trained interviewers. The visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to cross-validate the MOS.</p> <p>Results</p> <p>The MOS instrument was highly acceptable and easily administered. All subscales of the MOS demonstrated acceptable internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha above 0.70 except for role function that had 0.65. Each dimension of the MOS was highly correlated with the dimension measured concurrently using the VAS providing evidence of validity. Construct validity demonstrated remarkable differences in the functioning status and well-being among TB patients at different stages of treatment, between patients attending public and private hospitals, and between men and women of older age. Patients who were enrolled from public hospital had significantly lower HRQoL scores (0.78 (95% confidence interval (CI); 0.64-0.95)) for perceived health but significantly higher HRQoL scores (1.15 (95% CI; 1.06-1.26)) for health distress relative to patients from private hospital. Patients who completed an 8 months course of TB therapy had significantly higher HRQoL scores for perceived health (1.93 (95% CI; 1.19-3.13)), health distress subscales (1.29 (95% CI; 1.04-1.59)) and mental health summary scores (1.27 (95% CI; 1.09-1.48)) relative to patients that were starting therapy in multivariable analysis. Completion of 8 months TB therapy among patients who were recruited from the public hospital was associated with a significant increase in HRQoL scores for quality of life subscale (1.26 (95% CI; 1.08-1.49)), physical health summary score (1.22 995% CI; 1.04-1.43)), and VAS (1.08 (95% CI; 1.01-1.15)) relative to patients who were recruited from the private hospital. Older men were significantly associated with lower HRQoL scores for physical health summary score (0.68 (95% CI; 0.49-0.95)) and VAS (0.87 (95% CI; 0.75-0.99)) relative to women of the same age group. No differences were seen between HIV positive and HIV negative patients.</p> <p>Conclusion</p> <p>The study provides evidence that the MOS instrument is valid, and reliably measures HRQoL among TB patients, and can be used in a wide variety of study populations. The HRQoL differed by hospital settings, by duration of TB therapy, and by gender in older age groups.</p

    Functional status decline as a measure of adverse events in home health care: an observational study

    Get PDF
    BACKGROUND: Research that examines the quality of home health care is complex because no gold standard exists for measuring adverse outcomes, and because the patient and clinician populations are highly heterogeneous. The objectives in this study are to develop models to predict functional decline for three indices of functional status as measures of adverse events in home health care and determine which index is most appropriate for risk-adjusting for future quality research. METHODS: Data come from the Outcomes and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) from a large urban home health care agency and other agency data. Prognostic data yields 49,437 episodes, while follow-up data yields 47,684 episodes. We tested three indices defined as substantial decline in three or more (gt3_ADLs), two or more (gt2_ADLs), and one or more (gt1_ADLs) ADLs. Multivariate logistic regression determines the performance of the models for each index as measured by the c-statistic and Hosmer-Lemeshow chi square (χ(2)). RESULTS: Frequencies for gt3_ADLs, gt2_ADLs, and gt1_ADLs are 212 (0.43%), 783 (1.58%), and 4,271 (8.64%) respectively. Follow-up results are comparable with frequencies of 218 (0.46%), 763 (1.60%), and 3,949 (8.28%) for each index. Gt3_ADLs does not produce valid models. The model for gt2_ADLs consistently yields a higher c-statistic compared to gt1_ADLs (0.754 vs. 0.679, respectively). Both indices' models yield non-significant Hosmer-Lemeshow chi square indicating reasonable model fit. Findings for gt2_ADLs and gt1_ADLs are consistent over time as indicated by follow-up data results. CONCLUSION: Gt2_ADLs yields the best models as indicated by a high c-statistic and a non-significant Hosmer-Lemeshow χ(2), both of which exhibit exceptional consistency. We conclude that gt2_ADLs may be preferable in defining ADL adverse events in the context of home health care
    corecore