372 research outputs found

    Exercise Therapy for Plantar Heel Pain: A Systematic Review

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    International Journal of Exercise Science 5(3) : 276-289, 2012. This study aimed to review the evidence of exercise therapy in the treatment of Plantar Heel Pain. Comprehensive search strategy was conducted to identify randomized and quasi-randomized trials. The primary outcome was pain intensity; the secondary outcome was functional limitation. From an initial list of 2327 potentially relevant trials, seven trials were included. Most trials included short-term follow up only of pain and function outcomes. Narrative review revealed limited evidence that stretching exercise alone was superior to other conservative treatments; combining other conservative treatments with stretching was more effective than stretching exercise alone. Limited evidence showed that supervised clinical-based exercise is more effective than home-based self exercise. There is limited evidence that adding stretching exercise to the conservative treatment is more effective than control/ sham therapy. Future trials should investigate the effectiveness of long-term treatment of stretching and other forms of exercise therapy on larger sample size

    Exploring the experiences and perceptions of patients awaiting rotator cuff repair surgery: an integrated qualitative study within the POWER pilot and feasibility trial

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    Background: As waiting times for orthopaedic surgery increase, there have been calls to move from ‘waiting lists’ to ‘preparation lists’, to better prepare patients for surgery. In this context, a pilot randomised controlled trial (POWER) was conducted, comparing physiotherapist-led exercise to waiting-list control (usual care), for patients awaiting rotator cuff repair surgery. This qualitative study was integrated within the pilot trial.Objectives: ●Explore experiences of adults awaiting rotator cuff repair surgery in the NHS●Explore the acceptability of the physiotherapist-led exercise intervention●Explore barriers and enablers to recruitment, retention, and adherence Design: Integrated qualitative study with semi-structured telephone interviewsMethods: Adults awaiting rotator cuff repair, consenting to participate in the trial were eligible. Sampling was purposive regarding age, gender, randomised allocation, and hospital site. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data were analysed using Reflexive Thematic Analysis.Results: 20 participants were recruited (age range 49 to 81 years; 12 male, 10 randomised to physiotherapist-led exercise). Many participants were unable to recall their experiences of trial processes; nonetheless, three themes were identified from the data: experience of shoulder pain and pathway to treatment; communication and decision-making in the context of rotator cuff repair surgery; and experiences of the POWER physiotherapist-led exercise intervention and processes. Conclusions: Patients experience significant burden due to shoulder pain. Their journey to surgery can be long, confusing, and associated with perceived abandonment. In a future trial, the intervention should offer opportunity for shared decision-making, optional exit from the surgical pathway, and an individualised exercise programme

    How does the self-reported clinical management of patients with low back pain relate to the attitudes and beliefs of health care practitioners? A survey of UK general practitioners and physiotherapists

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    AbstractGuidelines for the management of low back pain (LBP) have existed for many years, but adherence to these by health care practitioners (HCPs) remains suboptimal. The aim of this study was to measure the attitudes, beliefs and reported clinical behaviour of UK physiotherapists (PTs) and general practitioners (GPs) about LBP and to explore the associations between these. A cross-sectional postal survey of GPs (n=2000) and PTs (n=2000) was conducted that included the Pain Attitudes and Beliefs Scale (PABT.PT), and a vignette of a patient with non-specific LBP (NSLBP) with questions asking about recommendations for work, activity and bedrest. Data from 1022 respondents (442 GPs and 580 PTs) who had recently treated patients with LBP were analysed. Although the majority of HCPs reported providing advice for the vignette patient that was broadly in line with guideline recommendations, 28% reported they would advise this patient to remain off work. Work advice was significantly related to the PABS.PT scores with higher biomedical (F1,986=77.5, p<0.0001) and lower behavioural (F1,981=31.9, p<0.001) scores associated with advice to remain off work. We have demonstrated that the attitudes and reported practice behaviour of UK GPs and PTs for patients with NSLBP are diverse. Many HCPs held the belief that LBP necessitates some avoidance of activities and work. The attitudes and beliefs of these HCPs were associated with their self-reported clinical behaviour regarding advice about work. Future studies need to investigate whether approaches aimed at modifying these HCP factors can lead to improved patient outcomes

    Guidelines for the use of diagnostic imaging in musculoskeletal pain conditions affecting the lower back, knee and shoulder: A scoping review

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    Background Musculoskeletal (MSK) pain is one of the most common reasons for primary care consultation, particularly pain in the lower back (LBP), knee and shoulder. The use of diagnostic imaging for MSK pain is increasing, but it is unclear whether this increase is justified on the basis of clinical practice guideline (CPG) recommendations. Aim To identify and map the content of CPGs that informs the use of diagnostic imaging in those with nontraumatic LBP, knee and shoulder pain in primary and intermediate care in the UK. Design and Setting A scoping review of CPGs. Methods This scoping review was conducted and is reported in accordance with PRISMA guidance. A broad search strategy included electronic searches of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsychINFO and SPORTDiscus from 2009 to 17 April 2019. This was conducted alongside a search of guideline repositories and was combined with a snowball search of Google, relevant professional bodies and use of social media. Results 31 relevant CPGs were included. Routine use of diagnostic imaging for those with nontraumatic LBP, knee or shoulder pain is generally discouraged in primary care or intermediate care. Diagnostic imaging should be reserved for when specific or serious pathology is suspected or where the person is not responding to initial nonsurgical management and the imaging result is expected to change clinical management decisions. Conclusion Diagnostic imaging should not be routinely requested in primary or intermediate care for nontraumatic LBP, knee or shoulder pain. CPGs do not justify the increasing imaging rates in the UK for MSK pain

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    Reasons for exclusion of the 136 full text papers. (DOCX 142 kb

    Recommendations on patient-facing websites regarding diagnostic imaging for low back, knee, and shoulder pain: A scoping review

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    Objective To describe and synthesise the content of public-facing websites regarding the use of diagnostic imaging for adults with lower back pain, knee, and shoulder pain. Methods Scoping review conducted in accordance with PRISMA guidance. A Google search was performed to identify public-facing websites that were either United Kingdom-based, or National Health Service affiliated. The DISCERN tool was used to appraise website quality before information regarding the use of imaging was synthesised using thematic analysis. Results Eighty-six websites were included, with 48 making reference to the use of imaging. The information within the majority (n = 43) of public-facing websites aligns with best available evidence. Where there is inconsistency, this may be explained by lower website quality. Three themes were apparent regarding the use of imaging – imaging to inform diagnosis and management; imaging in context; patient experience and expectations. Conclusion The recommendations and rationale for use of imaging contained within public-facing websites does not appear to justify the increase in imaging rates for musculoskeletal pain in the UK. Innovation Publicly available information following a novel search strategy, is largely aligned with best evidence, further understanding is required to determine reasons for requesting imaging from a patient and clinician perspective

    Exercise for lower limb osteoarthritis : systematic review incorporating trial sequential analysis and network meta-analysis

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    Objective: To determine whether there is sufficient evidence to conclude that exercise interventions are more effective than no exercise control and to compare the effectiveness of different exercise interventions in relieving pain and improving function in patients with lower limb osteoarthritis. Data sources: Nine electronic databases searched from inception to March 2012. Study selection: Randomised controlled trials comparing exercise interventions with each other or with no exercise control for adults with knee or hip osteoarthritis. Data extraction: Two reviewers evaluated eligibility and methodological quality. Main outcomes extracted were pain intensity and limitation of function. Trial sequential analysis was used to investigate reliability and conclusiveness of available evidence for exercise interventions. Bayesian network meta-analysis was used to combine both direct (within trial) and indirect (between trial) evidence on treatment effectiveness. Results: 60 trials (44 knee, two hip, 14 mixed) covering 12 exercise interventions and with 8218 patients met inclusion criteria. Sequential analysis showed that as of 2002 sufficient evidence had been accrued to show significant benefit of exercise interventions over no exercise control. For pain relief, strengthening, flexibility plus strengthening, flexibility plus strengthening plus aerobic, aquatic strengthening, and aquatic strengthening plus flexibility, exercises were significantly more effective than no exercise control. A combined intervention of strengthening, flexibility, and aerobic exercise was also significantly more effective than no exercise control for improving limitation in function (standardised mean difference −0.63, 95% credible interval −1.16 to −0.10). Conclusions: As of 2002 sufficient evidence had accumulated to show significant benefit of exercise over no exercise in patients with osteoarthritis, and further trials are unlikely to overturn this result. An approach combining exercises to increase strength, flexibility, and aerobic capacity is likely to be most effective in the management of lower limb osteoarthritis. The evidence is largely from trials in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Is acupuncture a useful adjunct to physiotherapy for older adults with knee pain?: The "Acupuncture, Physiotherapy and Exercise" (APEX) study [ISRCTN88597683]

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    BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a popular non-pharmacological modality for treating musculoskeletal pain. Physiotherapists are one of the largest groups of acupuncture providers within the NHS, and they commonly use it alongside advice and exercise. Conclusive evidence of acupuncture's clinical effectiveness and its superiority over sham interventions is lacking. The Arthritis Research Campaign (arc) has funded this randomised sham-controlled trial which addresses three important questions. Firstly, we will determine the additional benefit of true acupuncture when used by physiotherapists alongside advice and exercise for older people presenting to primary care with knee pain. Secondly, we will evaluate sham acupuncture in the same way. Thirdly, we will investigate the treatment preferences and expectations of both the participants and physiotherapists participating in the study, and explore the effect of these on clinical outcome. We will thus investigate whether acupuncture is a useful adjunct to advice and exercise for treating knee pain and gain insight into whether this effect is due to specific needling properties. METHODS/DESIGN: This randomised clinical trial will recruit 350 participants with knee pain to three intervention arms. It is based in 43 community physiotherapy departments in 21 NHS Trusts in the West Midlands and Cheshire regions in England. Patients aged 50 years and over with knee pain will be recruited. Outcome data will be collected by self-complete questionnaires before randomisation, and 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months after randomisation and by telephone interview 2 weeks after treatment commences. The questionnaires collect demographic details as well as information on knee-related pain, movement and function, pain intensity and affect, main functional problem, illness perceptions, self-efficacy, treatment preference and expectations, general health and quality of life. Participants are randomised to receive a package of advice and exercise; or this package plus real acupuncture; or this package plus sham acupuncture. Treatment details are being collected on a standard proforma. Interventions are delivered by experienced physiotherapists who have all received training in acupuncture to recognised national standards. The primary analysis will investigate the main treatment effects of real or sham acupuncture as an adjunct to advice and exercise. DISCUSSION: This paper presents detail on the rationale, design, methods, and operational aspects of the trial
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