1,554 research outputs found

    Mobile heritage practices. Implications for scholarly research, user experience design, and evaluation methods using mobile apps.

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    Mobile heritage apps have become one of the most popular means for audience engagement and curation of museum collections and heritage contexts. This raises practical and ethical questions for both researchers and practitioners, such as: what kind of audience engagement can be built using mobile apps? what are the current approaches? how can audience engagement with these experience be evaluated? how can those experiences be made more resilient, and in turn sustainable? In this thesis I explore experience design scholarships together with personal professional insights to analyse digital heritage practices with a view to accelerating thinking about and critique of mobile apps in particular. As a result, the chapters that follow here look at the evolution of digital heritage practices, examining the cultural, societal, and technological contexts in which mobile heritage apps are developed by the creative media industry, the academic institutions, and how these forces are shaping the user experience design methods. Drawing from studies in digital (critical) heritage, Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), and design thinking, this thesis provides a critical analysis of the development and use of mobile practices for the heritage. Furthermore, through an empirical and embedded approach to research, the thesis also presents auto-ethnographic case studies in order to show evidence that mobile experiences conceptualised by more organic design approaches, can result in more resilient and sustainable heritage practices. By doing so, this thesis encourages a renewed understanding of the pivotal role of these practices in the broader sociocultural, political and environmental changes.AHRC REAC

    Subsidence monitoring system for offshore applications: technology scouting and feasibility studies

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    Abstract. Because of concern about possible impacts of hydrocarbon production activities on coastal-area environments and infrastructures, new hydrocarbon offshore development projects in Italy must submit a monitoring plan to Italian authorities to measure and analyse real-time subsidence evolution. The general geological context, where the main offshore Adriatic fields are located, is represented by young unconsolidated terrigenous sediments. In such geological environments, sea floor subsidence, caused by hydrocarbon extraction, is quite probable. Though many tools are available for subsidence monitoring onshore, few are available for offshore monitoring. To fill the gap ENI (Ente Nazionale Idrocarburi) started a research program, principally in collaboration with three companies, to generate a monitoring system tool to measure seafloor subsidence. The tool, according to ENI design technical-specification, would be a robust long pipeline or cable, with a variable or constant outside diameter (less than or equal to 100 mm) and interval spaced measuring points. The design specifications for the first prototype were: to detect 1 mm altitude variation, to work up to 100 m water depth and investigation length of 3 km. Advanced feasibility studies have been carried out with: Fugro Geoservices B.V. (Netherlands), D'Appolonia (Italy), Agisco (Italy). Five design (using three fundamental measurements concepts and five measurement tools) were explored: cable shape changes measured by cable strain using fiber optics (Fugro); cable inclination measured using tiltmeters (D'Appolonia) and measured using fiber optics (Fugro); and internal cable altitude-dependent pressure changes measured using fiber optics (Fugro) and measured using pressure transducers at discrete intervals along the hydraulic system (Agisco). Each design tool was analysed and a rank ordering of preferences was performed. The third method (measurement of pressure changes), with the solution proposed by Agisco, was deemed most feasible. Agisco is building the first prototype of the tool to be installed in an offshore field in the next few years. This paper describes design of instruments from the three companies to satisfy the design specification.</p

    Hidden Florence Analytics Reports 2017-18

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    This is the final version.The article associated with this dataset is available in ORE at http://hdl.handle.net/10871/128865This report looks at the data available for the app Hidden Florence for the period between 8th January 2017 and 31st January 2018. The report is divided into three main sections: Section 1 is an historical overview of metrics related to the type of audience of the app from April 2015 to January 2018. Data here are gathered only from two platforms, iTunes and Google Play. Within Section 1, there is also a subsection (1.3) dedicated to the analysis of the sessions and their geography for data collected from iTunes Analytics. Section 2 looks at the data available on the platform Google Analytics. It is organised as a comparative analysis between data extrapolated from the previous report (Report 2015-17) and the current data available for the period from 8th January 2017 – 31st January 2018. Here data are investigated accordingly to the category of type of audience of the app. Section 3 looks at the data available for users’ behaviours for the period that goes from 8th January 2017 to the 31st January 2018. Here, a recurrent distinction of the data is between users accessing the app in Florence and users engaging with it elsewhere.Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)University of Exeter (IIB

    Communication and shared decision-making after stillbirth: Results of the ShaDeS study

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    Background: Shared decision-making (SDM) is included in guidelines for bereavement care after a stillbirth, as it can improve women’s long-term health and wellbeing. SDM within the stillbirth context is still not common, and Italy does not yet have standardised guidelines. Aim: The ShaDeS (Shared Decision-Making in Stillbirth) study aims to investigate how Italian women with a stillbirth perceive their own centrality in decision-making processes around bereavement care and how this might impact satisfaction of care. Methods: The ShaDeS study is a cross-sectional study based on a web survey consisted of four sections: socio- demographic information and medical history, communication of bad news and bereavement care, decisions about childbirth (SDM-Q-9, SHARED, and DCS), and decisions and communication about autopsy (CPS). Findings: 187 women answered the survey. For the 41.1% of women that did not have an emergency childbirth, the SDM-Q-9 median score was 66.6 (0–100 range), and the SHARED median score was 3.5 (1–5 range). 29.4% of participants reached the proposed cutoff of 37.5 in the DCS (0–100 range) suggesting a difficulty in reaching decisions. Satisfaction scores were lower for those with such difficulties (p &lt; 0.0001). Of the 64.5% of women that discussed autopsy, 28.3% were involved in an SDM approach, despite this being associated with higher levels of satisfaction of care (p &lt; 0.05). Conclusion: An SDM approach is only moderately widespread amongst our participants, despite it being signif- icantly related to higher levels of satisfaction. Further studies should investigate the tools that both patients and healthcare professionals need for an SDM approach

    Blumgart Anastomosis After Pancreaticoduodenectomy. A Comprehensive Systematic Review, Meta-Analysis, and Meta-Regression

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    Background: The superiority of Blumgart anastomosis (BA) over non-BA duct to mucosa (non-BA DtoM) still remains under debate. Methods: We performed a systematic search of studies comparing BA to non-BA DtoM. The primary endpoint was CR-POPF. Postoperative morbidity and mortality, post-pancreatectomy hemorrhage (PPH), delayed gastric emptying (DGE), reoperation rate, and length of stay (LOS) were evaluated as secondary endpoints. The meta-analysis was carried out using random effect. The results were reported as odds ratio (OR), risk difference (RD), weighted mean difference (WMD), and number needed to treat (NNT). Results: Twelve papers involving 2368 patients: 1075 BA and 1193 non-BA DtoM were included. Regarding the primary endpoint, BA was superior to non-BA DtoM (RD = 0.10; 95% CI: −0.16 to −0.04; NNT = 9). The multivariate ORs' meta-analysis confirmed BA's protective role (OR 0.26; 95% CI: 0.09 to 0.79). BA was superior to DtoM regarding overall morbidity (RD = −0.10; 95% CI: −0.18 to −0.02; NNT = 25), PPH (RD = −0.03; 95% CI −0.06 to −0.01; NNT = 33), and LOS (− 4.2&nbsp;days; −7.1 to −1.2 95% CI). Conclusion: BA seems to be superior to non-BA DtoM in avoiding CR-POPF

    Hidden Florence revealed? Critical insights from the operation of an augmented reality app in a World Heritage City

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    This is the final version. Available on open access from Routledge via the DOI in this recordData availability statement: The data on which this paper is based are available in aggregate form in an unpublished report compiled by Cristina Mosconi entitled Hidden Florence Analytics Report, 2017–18 which is deposited at https://ore.exeter.ac.uk/repository/handle/10871/125232Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, overtourism was a major topic in global tourism management discourse. The continued growth of international tourism placed pressure on many high-profile urban destinations containing some of the world's most important intrinsic cultural heritage. This paper critically examines the operation of Hidden Florence, a heritage tourism augmented reality (AR) application (app) for the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Florence in Italy. Since 2016, the city management plan has actively promoted digital and smart solutions to address the issues induced by mass heritage tourism. Through user engagement data from 2013 to 2018, this paper investigates the nature and extent of app use, both in and away from the city. The paper makes two main contributions. First, from a managerial perspective, the empirical analysis points to several major practical and methodological challenges if AR apps, and the data they generate, are to be employed effectively as part of the management of established heritage destinations. Second, the use of AR apps in, and smart approaches to, tourism management have been recently theorised and advocated. Evidence from Hidden Florence demonstrates that translating conceptual possibilities into longer-term management practices and beneficial change is more challenging than existing discourse concedes.Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)University of Exeter Innovation, Impact and Business Directorate Higher Education Innovation Fund (HEIF

    Two-stage hepatectomy with radioembolization for bilateral colorectal liver metastases: A case report

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    BACKGROUND Two-stage hepatectomy (TSH) is a well-established surgical technique, used to treat bilateral colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) with a small future liver remnant (FLR). However, in classical TSH, drop-out is reported to be around 25%- 40%, due to insufficient FLR increase or progression of disease. Trans-arterial radioembolization (TARE) has been described to control locally tumor growth of liver malignancies such as hepatocellular carcinoma, but it has been also reported to induce a certain degree of contralateral liver hypertrophy, even if at a lower rate compared to portal vein embolization or ligation. CASE SUMMARY Herein we report the case of a 75-year-old female patient, where TSH and TARE were combined to treat bilateral CRLM. According to computed tomography (CT)-scan, the patient had a hepatic lesion in segment VI-VII and two other confluent lesions in segment II-III. Therefore, one-stage posterior right sectionectomy plus left lateral sectionectomy (LLS) was planned. The liver volumetry estimated a FLR of 38% (segments I-IV-V-VIII). However, due to a more than initially planned, extended right resection, simultaneous LLS was not performed and the patient underwent selective TARE to segments II-III after the first surgery. The CT-scan performed after TARE showed a reduction of the treated lesion and a FLR increase of 55%. Carcinoembryonic antigen and CA 19.9 decreased significantly. Nearly three months later after the first surgery, LLS was performed and the patient was discharged without any postoperative complications. CONCLUSION According to this specific experience, TARE was used to induce liver hypertrophy and simultaneously control cancer progression in TSH settings for bilateral CRLM

    Innovative therapies for malignant brain tumors: the road to a tailored cure

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    Background: Immune tolerance, immune escape, neoangiogenesis, phenotypic changes, and glioma stem cells are all responsible for the resistance of malignant brain tumors to current therapies and persistent recurrence. The present study provides a panoramic view of innovative therapies for malignant brain tumors, especially glioblastoma, aimed at achieving a tailored approach. Methods: PubMed/Medline and ClinicalTri-als.gov were the main sources of an extensive literature review in which “Regenerative Medicine,” “Cell-Based Therapy,” “Chemotherapy,” “Vaccine,” “Cell Engineering,” “Immunotherapy, Active,” “Immunotherapy, Adoptive,” “Stem Cells,” “Gene Therapy,” “Target Therapy,” “Brain Cancer,” “Glioblastoma,” and “Malignant Brain Tumor” were the search terms. Only articles in English published in the last 5 years were included. A further selection was made according to the quality of the studies and level of evidence. Results: Cell-based and targeted therapies represent the newest frontiers of brain cancer treatment. Active and adoptive im-munotherapies, stem cell therapies, and gene therapies represent a tremendous evolution in recent years due to many preclinical and clinical studies. Clinical trials have validated the effectiveness of antibody-based immunotherapies, including an in-depth study of bevacizumab, in combination with standard of care. Pre-clinical data highlights the role of vaccines, stem cells, and gene therapies to prevent recurrence. Conclusion: Monoclonal antibodies strengthen the first-line therapy for high grade gliomas. Vaccines, engineered cells, stem cells, and gene and targeted therapies are good candidates for second-line treatment of both newly diagnosed and recurrent gliomas. Further data are necessary to validate this tailored approach at the bedside. (www.actabiomedica.it)

    The impact of stem cells in neuro-oncology: applications, evidence, limitations and challenges

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    Background: Stem cells (SCs) represent a recent and attractive therapeutic option for neuro-oncology, as well as for treating degenerative, ischemic and traumatic pathologies of the central nervous system. This is mainly because of their homing capacity, which makes them capable of reaching the inaccessible SC niches of the tumor, therefore, acting as living drugs. The target of the study is a comprehensive overview of the SC-based therapies in neuro-oncology, also highlighting the current translational challenges of this type of approach. Methods: An online search of the literature was carried out on the PubMed/MEDLINE and ClinicalTrials.gov websites, restricting it to the most pertinent keywords regarding the systematization of the SCs and their therapeutic use for malignant brain tumors. A large part of the search was dedicated to clinical trials. Only preclinical and clinical data belonging to the last 5 years were shortlisted. A further sorting was implemented based on the best match and relevance. Results: The results consisted in 96 relevant articles and 31 trials. Systematization involves a distinction between human embryonic, fetal and adult, but also totipo-tent, pluripotent or multipotent SCs. Mesenchymal and neuronal SCs were the most studied for neuro-oncological illnesses. 30% and 50% of the trials were phase I and II, respectively. Conclusion: Mesenchymal and neuronal SCs are ideal candidates for SCs-based therapy of malignant brain tumors. The spectrum of their possible applications is vast and is mainly based on the homing capacity toward the tumor microenvironment. Availability, delivery route, oncogenicity and ethical issues are the main translational challenges concerning the use of SCs in neuro-oncology. (www.actabiomedica.it)
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