51,136 research outputs found

    Developing and Promoting Multi-lateral South - South Higher Education Institute Research in Africa

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    The African Unions’ (AU) vision for African HEIs to become ‘a dynamic force in the international arena’ under the harmonisation of higher education programmes in Africa, fits in directly with the objectives of the Africa Academy for Environmental Health. The AU seeks to identify innovative forms of collaboration, to facilitate mobilisation of students, graduates and academic staff across Africa, and to ensure that this is an African driven process, among other areas. One of the key areas in the development of the African continent is the establishment of research based policy development. Historically, many policy makers have tended to rely on external experts and institutions to undertake much of this research, and African HEIs have sought partnerships with European and North American institutions rather than those within the continent. This has led to a significant decline in both the quality and quantity of research outputs from African Universities due to lack of belief, time, funding and resources. As such, instead of African led research, many academics undertake consultancies which are often driven by external donors. This also means that, in many cases, research does not address the African context of the work, or more pressing issues which need to be addressed and effectively utilised in policy development

    Academic orientation and mentoring - tackling the gender disparities and higher education limitations in Africa

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    Most universities in the developed world have instigated orientation and mentoring programmes for probationary academic members of staff to allow them to reach their full potential as teachers and researchers. Orientation and mentoring programmes in most African Universities are lacking, not functional and/or not implemented which places new academics at a disadvantage and can be career threatening. Based on extensive consultation and questionnaire with environmental health (EH) academics indicated that up to 63% faced problems when beginning their careers in academia. The most common problem related to a lack of orientation and being appointed to a position for which they had no prior experience or support. Mentoring from more experienced academics in their department and faculty, particularly for female academics was absent or not properly applied in the majority of institutions. The disparities between men and women in their professional academic careers must also be taken into consideration in terms of mentoring and support to enable all academics to develop successful teaching and learning careers. With the lack of institutional experience held in some Universities, such mentoring schemes can be strengthened through the use of regional and pan African networks to allow academics to gain access to a wealth of experience and advice in their fields. The Africa Academy for Environmental Health (AAEH) recommends the following actions on the part of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) and associated networks to address these challenges as piloted by the AAEH: (1) Development of standard orientation package for all new members of academic staff; (2) initiation of mentoring schemes for academic staff using traditional and innovative methods both institutionally and regionally similar to that achieved in environmental health

    Reproductive Hazards: A Labor-Feminist Alliance

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    [Excerpt] This term the U.S. Supreme Court will hear a case called UAW vs. Johnson Controls. The Court will decide on the legality of excluding women from certain jobs under the guise of protecting unborn children. The decision may have a dramatic impact on the future of women\u27s equal employment opportunity and on companies\u27 responsibility to provide clean and healthy workplaces for all workers

    A Poem: Pop-Star

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    Recruitment and orientation of students studying environmental health in African Higher education institutions

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    For many students attending African Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), the course and subsequent career they follow may not be their first choice due to limited places and school/ placement results. This is also compounded with the transition from government school systems to higher education where expectations are different and self discipline and study are essential. A survey of environmental health students in seven HEIs in six African countries indicated that only 68% received orientation when starting their university careers. Two out of every five students indicated that environmental health (EH) was not their first choice of course and just over half of those reported that they did not know what environmental health was when they began the course. Induction and orientation of new students has been shown to assist academic integration and enhance student outcomes. However, many EH departments in HEIs do not currently have a standard orientation and induction process for new students, often relying on institutional systems to undertake this task which can overburden students with information and systems. Subsequently, students are unaware of academic expectations, are unfamiliar with facilities and departmental staff and cannot see where their studies are taking them in terms of a career. To overcome these obstacles the Africa Academy for Environmental Health (AAEH) has developed a guidance note for student recruitment and orientation which contains generic packages departments can adapt as necessary. These systems have been piloted and adapted as necessary. The AAEH therefore advocate the following recommendations: (1) that all EH departments in HEIs follow the guidance document to assist in the adaptation and socialisation of students into the higher education system, (2) that further research be undertaken in HEIs to identify suitable innovative and interactive methods to achieve student orientation in both school and HEI level

    Levelling the playing field for female academics to access scholarships and research funds

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    Although the balance of male to female academics in environmental health in Africa has improved over the years, there is still inequity between the academic genders. Recent evidence suggests that female academics are often found on a lower grade and salary on the University hierarchical scale compared with their male and slightly younger counterparts. To achieve equity in research and knowledge management of female environmental health issues in Africa, it is imperative that gender balance is achieved within academic practice. Lifestyle and work patterns of male and female academics require to be taken cognisance of by donor agencies when determining the eligibility criteria to apply for scholarships to study for higher degrees. Female academics often have to withdraw from the academic field for childbirth, child rearing in the first few years. In addition to fulfilling their role as mothers they are also the care givers within the family they are still expected to undertake the usual domestic chores of a wife and care for elderly relatives, unlike their male counterparts in comparison. All of which places female academics at a disadvantage in status upon return to work. After extensive consultation with both male and female academics working in the field of environmental health in Africa, the Africa Academy for Environmental Health (AAEH) advocate three recommendations for funding bodies and higher education institutions to adopt in their policies: (1) Increase age restrictions in donor scholarship and funding applications for female academics to accommodate their maternal and domestic responsibilities; (2) Scholarship awarding bodies should actively promote funding of split site and home based postgraduate studies. This would provide an equal opportunity for female academics to attain quality qualifications irrespective of their maternal and domestic commitments and ensure research is gender balanced and specific to the African context; and (3) Universities should implement effective mentoring schemes in place to support the needs of junior academics and develop their research and teaching skills

    Towards effective diarrhoea disease control in Malawi : Assessment of current programmes and challenges

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    This report assesses the current programmes and challenges of diarrhoea disease control in Malawi and looks at increasing the effectiveness of these programme

    Photo Essay: HMCS \u3cem\u3eHaida\u3c/em\u3e

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    In Canada, historic naval ships are not as plentiful as in the United States but their history is just as rich. Although Canada’s naval tradition is a young one, officially starting with the Naval Act in 1910, the legacy is a lasting one that continues to thrive up to the present with the commissioning of the new City Class Frigates. Canadians have chosen to preserve three of the many ships that saw service in WWII. Two of them, the corvette HMCS Sackville and COS Acadia are in Halifax and the other, the destroyer HMCS Haid, is in Toronto. The post-war vessel HMCS Bras D’Or is also preserved. It is very likely that other ships will be saved in this way with current plans to bring HMCS Fraser to Kingston, Ontario. It is sometimes hard to believe that you can actually still stand on the decks of some of the most famous ships in Canada but there is no doubt about the thrill of such an act once you are aboard. The following photo essay gives you a glimpse into HMCS Haida’s past but to really feel it you should come aboard

    A Poem: Natural Order

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