17 research outputs found

    The role of accounting technologies in the context of public sector reforms: a critical ethnographical study of the organisational and cultural transformations of a governmental agency in the Australian state of New South Wales

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    This thesis is about the exploration of the role of accounting technologies in the context of the public sector reform initiatives in the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW). A Government Department of the NS W has been adopted as a field of investigation for the purpose of this exploration. The organisation which is investigated has undergone tremendous organisational and cultural changes which were prompted by the public sector reform initiatives of the NSW Government during the late 1980s and early 1990s. Consequently the Department adopted new management and financial practices. This study investigated how accounting discourses and practices are contributing to and are being transformed by the introduction of new management practices in this organisation. In addition, in this study, the dysfunctional consequences of the public sector reforms, as raised in various scholarly writings, are also highlighted. Overall, this study explored the position of this Department in the light of success or failure to face such organisational and cultural changes. This study is based on the methodology of naturalistic and interpretive interests. An amalgam of organisational change models proposed by Laughlin and Geertz\u27s interpretive culture are adopted as the theoretical and analytical frameworks for this study. Although the Department is involved in commercial operations, it did not give up the social obligations expected of a Governmental Department. Profit maximisation is not a goal but rather satisfying customers. The Department is a success story of the NSW Government\u27s public sector reform initiatives. This Department now regards itself not only as being a commercial organisation, but also as being in the business of delivering quality services to customers in a largely competitive market where the majority of the Department\u27s customers have freedom of choice in their service provider. The Department has aligned its goals with an ethic of best practice in service delivery and a motto that the needs of the customer should be paramount. The shift has definitely delivered significant tangible and intangible results to the government, to the tax payers and to its customers. Nevertheless this Department remains in the unique position of having the legal status of a Department of State and yet operating competitively and commercially. Accounting technologies in this Department have played both instrumental and non- instrumental roles in its reform processes. Accounting technologies are well placed in this Department to facilitate the organisational and cultural changes that are required to respond to the public sector reform initiatives. New accounting technologies which were introduced to meet the demands of its reform processes have certainly found an effective foothold in the new commercialised culture of the Department and have also become the dominant language in the new culture. Considering the experiences of this Department, it can be said that there are positive examples of public sector reforms where accounting technologies can play a very significant role

    Institutional isomorphism and the adoption of lASs in a developing country: another crisis of external dependence

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    This paper provides a critical evaluation of the recent decision of the Bangladeshi accounting profession to adopt all applicable International Accounting Standards. The paper argues that institutional legitimisation is a key factor that drives the adoption process. This argument is based on evidence of immense pressure that major international donor/lending institutions put on the Bangladeshi government and professional accounting bodies to adopt lASs not only to provide credibility to foreign investors but also ensure that accountability arrangements with lending/donor agencies are tight enough. Clearly, the government and other institutions in Bangladesh have very little option (if any at all) because of the country\u27s high dependence on aid. We argue that a wholesale adoption of lASs constitutes a quick-fix that may not necessarily be in the long-term interest of Bangladesh and its accounting institutions

    The current status of environmental reporting by Indian companies

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    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the state of environmental reporting by Indian companies on their web sites and also in their annual reports. Design/methodology/approach – The web sites of the companies in the sample were visited to examine the accessibility and extent of environmental information disclosure on their web sites. The annual reports for 2003-2004, as available on the companies' web sites were selected to investigate the extent of environmental information disclosure in these annual reports. Findings – The paper finds that, although there are no regulations enforcing the disclosure of environmental information, most of the Indian companies have disclosed environmental information. These companies provided more environmental information on their web sites compared to the information provided in their annual reports. Originality/value – This study contributes to the existing body of environmental reporting literature by focusing on the status of environmental reporting by companies of an emerging economy and also contributes to the existing body of environmental reporting literature by focusing on the accessibility of environmental information on web sites of respective companiesBusiness environment, Corporate governance, Emerging markets, India, Reports

    The role of mandatory cost audit in enhancing trust: the case of India

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    Purpose – The purpose of this paper explores whether cost audits as governance mechanism affected the trust of the users of financial statements and whether they provide the benefits intended by regulators. Design/methodology/approach – The research method involved unstructured open-ended face-to-face interviews with cost auditors in practice, mid- to high-level accounts and finance executives of companies and investors. Twenty-three interviews were conducted over a five-week period from December 2004 to January 2005 in Kolkata city of India. The selection of respondents was purposive, to explore the attitudes of these three groups towards mandatory cost audit. Findings – Mandatory cost audit in India has not enhanced the level of trust of investors and preparers of financial statements also have the opinion. It has not brought those benefits expected by regulators. Research limitations/implications – It is suggested following the findings of this paper that future research should carefully consider the usefulness and cost and benefit aspects of the mandatory cost audit in India. Originality/value – This is a pioneering study providing an in-depth analysis of mandatory cost auditing in India.Auditing, Cost accounting, Financial reporting, India, Trust

    Customer satisfaction measurement for state owned banks in least developed countries- a case of Bangladesh

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    Customer Satisfaction has become an important dimension for performance measurement particularly for banking and finance industry. As most banks and finance organizations offer similar products and services, improving customer satisfaction and loyalty is the most important factor in maintaining as well as increasing market share for these organizations. Customer satisfaction is grossly neglected area for performance measurement in most Least Developed Countries (LDCs) including Bangladesh. Like most LDCs, Bangladesh is also facing external pressures from IMF, World Bank, ADB etc for reforming incompetent financial sector. The purpose of the paper is to identify the factors that affect and explain customer satisfactions in state-owned commercial banks (SCBs) in comparison with private banks of Bangladesh. This study has focused on how customer satisfaction indicators can direct the policy measures in shaping and reforming the currently loss staggering, bureaucratic, poor quality and corrupted state-owned banks which still controls the financial market through 3383 branches (50% of total branches of banking sector). The findings of the study are expected to guide state-owned commercial banks as well as private, foreign and Islamic banks in Bangladesh to improve their customer satisfaction

    In pursuit of environmental excellence

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