31 research outputs found

    A Novel Non-parametric Density Estimation Approach to Measuring Muon Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange in the MICE Experiment

    No full text
    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) located at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the U.K. has demonstrated muon ionization beam cooling for the first time. A beam of muons in MICE is produced from high-energy proton beam collision with a fixed target, generating pions which in turn decay into muons. Pion-decay muons, thus, are tertiary particles and, as a result, occupy a large volume in position‒momentum phase space. To fit the muon beam into smaller and more cost-effective accelerating devices, muon beam phase‒space volume needs to be reduced (beam cooling). Ionization beam cooling, which before MICE has never been demonstrated experimentally for muons, is the only technique fast enough to be used for muons within their short lifetime. Ionization cooling occurs when muons traverse an absorbing material and lose momentum through ionization energy loss. The cooling effect in MICE is measured using two scintillating-fiber tracking detectors. These trackers, one upstream and one downstream of the absorber, reconstruct and measure the position and momentum coordinates of each muon. Given the precision MICE needed to demonstrate beam cooling, it is necessary to develop analysis tools that can account for any effects that may lead to inaccurate measurement of cooling, such as non‒linear effects in beam optics. Non‒parametric density estimation techniques, such as kernel density estimation (KDE), provide a basis for creating analysis tools that are robust against these effects, directly calculating the muon beam phase-space density and volume for demonstrating beam cooling. This thesis focuses on the application of KDE to the measurement of beam cooling in MICE. The KDE technique is validated using known distributions and is applied to simulated and experimental MICE data corresponding to the various magnet, optics, and absorber configurations. Using the KDE technique, muon beam cooling in the four‒dimensional transverse phase space, as well as reverse emittance exchange using MICE data have been demonstrated

    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), Far Detector Technical Design Report, Volume I Introduction to DUNE

    No full text
    International audienceThe preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of the supernovae that produced the heavy elements necessary for life, and whether protons eventually decay—these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our universe, its current state, and its eventual fate. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector technical design report (TDR) describes the DUNE physics program and the technical designs of the single- and dual-phase DUNE liquid argon TPC far detector modules. This TDR is intended to justify the technical choices for the far detector that flow down from the high-level physics goals through requirements at all levels of the Project. Volume I contains an executive summary that introduces the DUNE science program, the far detector and the strategy for its modular designs, and the organization and management of the Project. The remainder of Volume I provides more detail on the science program that drives the choice of detector technologies and on the technologies themselves. It also introduces the designs for the DUNE near detector and the DUNE computing model, for which DUNE is planning design reports. Volume II of this TDR describes DUNE's physics program in detail. Volume III describes the technical coordination required for the far detector design, construction, installation, and integration, and its organizational structure. Volume IV describes the single-phase far detector technology. A planned Volume V will describe the dual-phase technology

    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), Far Detector Technical Design Report, Volume II: DUNE Physics

    No full text
    The preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of the supernovae that produced the heavy elements necessary for life, and whether protons eventually decay -- these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our universe, its current state, and its eventual fate. DUNE is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector technical design report (TDR) describes the DUNE physics program and the technical designs of the single- and dual-phase DUNE liquid argon TPC far detector modules. Volume II of this TDR, DUNE Physics, describes the array of identified scientific opportunities and key goals. Crucially, we also report our best current understanding of the capability of DUNE to realize these goals, along with the detailed arguments and investigations on which this understanding is based. This TDR volume documents the scientific basis underlying the conception and design of the LBNF/DUNE experimental configurations. As a result, the description of DUNE's experimental capabilities constitutes the bulk of the document. Key linkages between requirements for successful execution of the physics program and primary specifications of the experimental configurations are drawn and summarized. This document also serves a wider purpose as a statement on the scientific potential of DUNE as a central component within a global program of frontier theoretical and experimental particle physics research. Thus, the presentation also aims to serve as a resource for the particle physics community at large

    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) Near Detector Conceptual Design Report

    No full text
    International audienceThe Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is an international, world-class experiment aimed at exploring fundamental questions about the universe that are at the forefront of astrophysics and particle physics research. DUNE will study questions pertaining to the preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of supernovae, the subtleties of neutrino interaction physics, and a number of beyond the Standard Model topics accessible in a powerful neutrino beam. A critical component of the DUNE physics program involves the study of changes in a powerful beam of neutrinos, i.e., neutrino oscillations, as the neutrinos propagate a long distance. The experiment consists of a near detector, sited close to the source of the beam, and a far detector, sited along the beam at a large distance. This document, the DUNE Near Detector Conceptual Design Report (CDR), describes the design of the DUNE near detector and the science program that drives the design and technology choices. The goals and requirements underlying the design, along with projected performance are given. It serves as a starting point for a more detailed design that will be described in future documents

    The DUNE Far Detector Vertical Drift Technology, Technical Design Report