11 research outputs found

    Clinicians’ Perceptions of Parent-Child Arts Therapy with Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Milman Center Experience

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    Different types of arts offer a wide variety of modes of nonverbal communication and expressive tools for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The present study was designed to characterize therapists’ perspectives on the implementation of a parent-child arts therapy model for children with ASD. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 arts therapists who participated in the study. The thematic analysis (qualitative analysis) approach yielded seven themes: (1) Therapeutic goals. (2) Adjusting the therapeutic intervention. (3) The advantages of parent-child arts therapy. (4) Difficulties in parent-child arts therapy. (5) The unique contribution of the participants to parent-child arts therapy. (6) The different types of arts in the therapy room. (7) The arts therapists’ assessment of the progress of therapy. The discussion focuses on the four central components of parent-child arts therapy room: the child in therapy, the parent, the arts therapist, and the creative arts

    Clinicians’ Perceptions of Parent-Child Arts Therapy with Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Milman Center Experience

    No full text
    Different types of arts offer a wide variety of modes of nonverbal communication and expressive tools for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The present study was designed to characterize therapists’ perspectives on the implementation of a parent-child arts therapy model for children with ASD. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 arts therapists who participated in the study. The thematic analysis (qualitative analysis) approach yielded seven themes: (1) Therapeutic goals. (2) Adjusting the therapeutic intervention. (3) The advantages of parent-child arts therapy. (4) Difficulties in parent-child arts therapy. (5) The unique contribution of the participants to parent-child arts therapy. (6) The different types of arts in the therapy room. (7) The arts therapists’ assessment of the progress of therapy. The discussion focuses on the four central components of parent-child arts therapy room: the child in therapy, the parent, the arts therapist, and the creative arts

    Parents’ attitudes toward children’s vaccination as a marker of trust in health systems

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    Children’s vaccination is a major goal in health-care systems worldwide; nevertheless, disparities in vaccination coverage expose socio-demographic accessibility gaps, unawareness, physicians’ disapproval and parents’ incomplete adherence reflecting insufficient public-provider trust. Our goal was to analyze parents’ attitude toward children’s vaccination in correlation with trust among stakeholders. A total of 1031 parents replied to a “snowball” questionnaire; 72% reported high trust in their physician, 42% trusted the authorities, 11% trusted internet groups. Among minorities, parents who fully vaccinate their children were younger, live in urban areas, eat all kinds of foods and trust the authorities, similar to the general population. Low adherence to children’s vaccination was correlated with trusting internet groups. Females complied significantly more to child vaccination, although in our study mothers were more highly educated and trusted authorities more than males. The results enable to draw a profile of the “vaccination compliant parent” (with an academic degree, young, urban, eats all kinds of foods, uses conservative medicine). Trust is a major factor influencing vaccination, yet external forces such as community voices, social trends and opinions of religious leaders may play a role in vaccination adherence, beyond personal beliefs, individual habits and self-care. In Israel, education and “healthy behavior” perception alongside generous coverage encourage most parents to comply with the routine vaccination program. In the shade of pandemic outbreaks, we suggest a social-determinant transparent approach to encourage parents to vaccinate their children. Social and religious leaders can pose as agents of change, especially in the case of less educated parents

    A meta-analysis identifies factors predicting the future development of freezing of gait in Parkinson’s disease

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    Abstract Freezing of gait (FOG) is a debilitating problem that is common among many, but not all, people with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Numerous attempts have been made at treating FOG to reduce its negative impact on fall risk, functional independence, and health-related quality of life. However, optimal treatment remains elusive. Observational studies have recently investigated factors that differ among patients with PD who later develop FOG, compared to those who do not. With prediction and prevention in mind, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of publications through 31.12.2022 to identify risk factors. Studies were included if they used a cohort design, included patients with PD without FOG at baseline, data on possible FOG predictors were measured at baseline, and incident FOG was assessed at follow-up. 1068 original papers were identified, 38 met a-priori criteria, and 35 studies were included in the meta-analysis (n = 8973; mean follow-up: 4.1 ± 2.7 years). Factors significantly associated with a risk of incident FOG included: higher age at onset of PD, greater severity of motor symptoms, depression, anxiety, poorer cognitive status, and use of levodopa and COMT inhibitors. Most results were robust in four subgroup analyses. These findings indicate that changes associated with FOG incidence can be detected in a subset of patients with PD, sometimes as long as 12 years before FOG manifests, supporting the possibility of predicting FOG incidence. Intriguingly, some of these factors may be modifiable, suggesting that steps can be taken to lower the risk and possibly even prevent the future development of FOG

    Tobacco smoke incursion into private residences in Israel: a cross-sectional study examining public perceptions of private rights and support for governmental policies

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    Abstract Background Tobacco smoke incursion (TSI) into private residences is a widespread problem in many countries. We sought to assess the prevalence of self-reported TSI and public attitudes about TSI in Israel, a country with a relatively high smoking prevalence and high population density. Methods We conducted a random digit dial survey among residents in Israel (N = 285) in 2017, which examined the frequency, source, correlates of, and attitudes towards TSI and potential regulatory options. The cooperation rate was 63.9%. Results Among respondents, 44.7% reported ever experiencing home TSI, with higher exposure among residents of multi-unit housing (MUH) (MUH versus private homes: aOR (Adjusted Odds Ratio): 3.60, CI (Confidence Interval): [1.96, 6.58], p < .001). Most respondents (69.8%), including nearly half of smokers, prioritized the right of individuals to breath smoke-free air in their apartments over the right of smokers to smoke in their apartments. Women and non-smokers were more likely to support the right to breathe smoke-free air (Women versus men: aOR: 2.77 CI: [1.48, 5.16], p = .001; Nonsmokers versus smokers: aOR: 3.21 CI [1.59, 6.48], p = .001). However, only about a quarter (24.8%) of respondents who ever experienced TSI raised the issue with the neighbor who smoked, the neighbor's landlord, or the building committee. The vast majority (85.2%) of all respondents, including three-quarters of smokers, supported smoke-free legislation for multi-unit housing (MUH), with those ever-exposed to TSI and non-smokers more likely to support legislation (ever-exposed versus never-exposed aOR = 2.99, CI [1.28, 6.97], p = 0.011; nonsmokers versus smokers aOR = 3.00, CI [1.28, 7.01], p = 0.011). Conclusions Among study participants, tobacco smoke incursion was a common, yet unwelcome experience. Most respondents believed that the right to breathe smoke-free air in one's apartment superseded that of neighbors to smoke anywhere in their home, and most supported legislation to prevent TSI. Though further study is needed to understand better TSI and effective methods for its prevention, our findings suggest that policy interventions, including legal action at the level of the Supreme Court and/or the Knesset, are needed. Regulation, policy initiatives and campaigns to denormalize smoking in proximity to other people and private residences globally could reduce the scope of this widespread problem, protect individuals from home TSI, and improve population health

    Tobacco Smoke Exposure According to Location of Home Smoking in Israel: Findings from the Project Zero Exposure Study

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    Young children are particularly vulnerable to harms from tobacco smoke exposure (TSE). This study aimed to compare TSE: (1) between children who live in smoking families and those who do not; and (2) among children who live in smoking households with varying smoking locations. The data came from two studies that were conducted concurrently in Israel (2016–2018). Study 1: a randomized controlled trial of smoking families (n = 159); Study 2: a cohort study of TSE among children in non-smoking families (n = 20). Hair samples were collected from one child in each household. Baseline hair nicotine data were analyzed for 141 children in Study 1 and 17 children in Study 2. Using a logistic regression analysis (exposed vs. not exposed as per laboratory determination) and a linear regression (log hair nicotine), we compared TSE between: (1) children in Study 1 vs. Study 2; (2) children in families with different smoking locations in Study 1: balcony; garden, yard, or other place outside of the home; or inside the home (designated smoking areas within the home (DSAs) or anywhere). A higher proportion of children living in smoking households were measurably exposed to tobacco smoke (68.8%) compared to children living in non-smoking households (35.3%, p = 0.006). Among children from smoking families, 75.0% of those whose parents smoked in the house were exposed, while 61.8% of children whose parents restricted smoking to the porch (n = 55) were exposed, and 71.4% of those whose parents smoked outside the home (including gardens and yards) (n = 42) were exposed. In univariable and multivariable models, smoking location was not significantly associated with exposure. The majority of children in smoking families were measurably exposed to TSE, even if smoking was restricted to designated areas in the home, balconies, orgarden/yard/other outdoor areas. Reducing population smoking rates, particularly among parents, restricting smoking to at least 10 meters from homes and children, and denormalizing smoking around others are recommended to reduce population-level child TSE and tobacco-attributable disease and death

    The association between risk perceptions, anxiety, and self-reported changes in tobacco and nicotine product use due to COVID-19 in May-June 2020 in Israel

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    Abstract Background Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, reports about a possible protective effect of nicotine on COVID-19 conflicted with messaging by public health organizations about increased risks of COVID-19 due to smoking. The ambiguous information the public received, combined with COVID-19-induced anxiety, may have led to changes in tobacco or other nicotine product use. This study examined changes in use of combustible cigarettes (CCs), nargila (hookah/waterpipe), e-cigarettes, and IQOS and home-smoking behaviors. We also assessed COVID-19 related anxiety and perceptions regarding changes in risk of COVID-19 severity due to smoking. Methods We used cross-sectional data from a population telephone survey that was conducted in Israel in the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic (May–June 2020) and included 420 adult (age 18+) individuals who reported having ever used CCs (n = 391), nargila (n = 193), and/or electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes)/heated tobacco products (e.g., IQOS) (n = 52). Respondents were asked about the effect that COVID-19 had on their nicotine product use (quit/reduced use, no change, increased use). We assessed changes in product use, risk perceptions, and anxiety using adjusted multinomial logistic regression analyses. Results Most respondents did not change their frequency of product use (CCs: 81.0%, nargila: 88.2%, e-cigarettes/IQOS: 96.8%). A small percentage either decreased use (CCs: 7.2%, nargila: 3.2%, e-cigarettes/IQOS:2.4%) or increased use (CCs:11.8%, nargila:8.6%, e-cigarettes/IQOS:+ 0.9%). 55.6% of respondents used a product in the home prior to COVID-19; but during the first lockdown COVID-19 period, a greater percentage increased (12.6%) than decreased (4.0%) their home use. Higher levels of anxiety due to COVID-19 were associated with increased home smoking (aOR = 1.59, 95% CI:1.04–2.42, p = 0.02). Many respondents believed that increased severity of COVID-19 illness was associated with CCs (62.0%) and e-cigarettes/vaping (45.3%), with uncertainty about the association being lower for CCs (20.5%) than for vaping (41.3%). Conclusions While many respondents believed that nicotine product use (particularly CCs and e-cigarettes) was associated with increased risk of COVID-19 disease severity, the majority of users did not change their tobacco/nicotine use. The confusion about the relationship between tobacco use and COVID-19 calls for clear evidence-based messaging from governments. The association between home smoking and increased COVID-19-related stress suggests the need for campaigns and resources to prevent smoking in the home, particularly during times of stress

    Additional file 2 of The association between risk perceptions, anxiety, and self-reported changes in tobacco and nicotine product use due to COVID-19 in May-June 2020 in Israel

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    Additional file 2. Reported use of combustible cigarettes (CCs), Nargila, and E-cigarettes/IQOS before COVID-19, by Population Group and gender: Descriptive statistics (Weighted data)
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