55 research outputs found

    Boundary conditions in the Dirac approach to graphene devices

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    We study a family of local boundary conditions for the Dirac problem corresponding to the continuum limit of graphene, both for nanoribbons and nanodots. We show that, among the members of such family, MIT bag boundary conditions are the ones which are in closest agreement with available experiments. For nanotubes of arbitrary chirality satisfying these last boundary conditions, we evaluate the Casimir energy via zeta function regularization, in such a way that the limit of nanoribbons is clearly determined.Comment: 10 pages, no figure. Section on Casimir energy adde

    Energy Band Gap Engineering of Graphene Nanoribbons

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    We investigate electronic transport in lithographically patterned graphene ribbon structures where the lateral confinement of charge carriers creates an energy gap near the charge neutrality point. Individual graphene layers are contacted with metal electrodes and patterned into ribbons of varying widths and different crystallographic orientations. The temperature dependent conductance measurements show larger energy gaps opening for narrower ribbons. The sizes of these energy gaps are investigated by measuring the conductance in the non-linear response regime at low temperatures. We find that the energy gap scales inversely with the ribbon width, thus demonstrating the ability to engineer the band gap of graphene nanostructures by lithographic processes.Comment: 7 pages including 4 figure

    High-resolution spatial mapping of the temperature distribution of a Joule self-heated graphene nanoribbon

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    We investigate the temperature distributions of Joule self-heated graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with a spatial resolution finer than 100 nm by scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). The SThM probe is calibrated using the Raman G mode Stokes/anti-Stokes intensity ratio as a function of electric power applied to the GNR devices. From a spatial map of the temperature distribution, heat dissipation and transport pathways are investigated. By combining SThM and scanning gate microscopy data from a defected GNR, we observe hot spot formation at well-defined, localized sites.Comment: 4 pages, 3 figures, accepted on App. Phys. Let

    Bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma: patient survival after surgical treatment

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    <p>Abstract</p> <p>Background</p> <p>Surgery is the primary treatment of skeletal metastases from renal cell carcinoma, because radiation and chemotherapy frequently are not effecting the survival. We therefore explored factors potentially affecting the survival of patients after surgical treatment.</p> <p>Methods</p> <p>We retrospectively reviewed 101 patients operatively treated for skeletal metastases of renal cell carcinoma between 1980 and 2005. Overall survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The effects of different variables were evaluated using a log-rank test.</p> <p>Results</p> <p>27 patients had a solitary bone metastasis, 20 patients multiple bone metastases and 54 patients had concomitant visceral metastases. The overall survival was 58% at 1 year, 37% at 2 years and 12% at 5 years. Patients with solitary bone metastases had a better survival (p < 0.001) compared to patients with multiple metastases. Age younger than 65 years (p = 0.036), absence of pathologic fractures (p < 0.001) and tumor-free resection margins (p = 0.028) predicted higher survival. Gender, location of metastases, time between diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma and treatment of metastatic disease, incidence of local recurrence, radiation and chemotherapy did not influence survival.</p> <p>Conclusions</p> <p>The data suggest that patients with a solitary metastasis or a limited number of resectable metastases are candidates for wide resections. As radiation and chemotherapy are ineffective in most patients, surgery is a better option to achieve local tumor control and increase the survival.</p

    Genetic susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma in chromosome 22q13.31, findings of a genome-wide association study.

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    Background and Aim: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, long-term alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and obesity are the major risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the United States, but the disease risk varies substantially among individuals with these factors, suggesting host susceptibility to and gene-environment interactions in HCC. To address genetic susceptibility to HCC, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Methods: Two case-control studies on HCC were conducted in the United States. DNA samples were genotyped using the Illumian microarray chip with over 710 000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We compared these SNPs between 705 HCC cases and 1455 population controls for their associations with HCC and verified our findings in additional studies. Results: In this GWAS, we found that two SNPs were associated with HCC at Conclusions: SNPs i

    Lung Cancer Risk in Never-Smokers of European Descent is Associated With Genetic Variation in the 5(p)15.33 TERT-CLPTM1Ll Region

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    Introduction: Inherited susceptibility to lung cancer risk in never-smokers is poorly understood. The major reason for this gap in knowledge is that this disease is relatively uncommon (except in Asians), making it difficult to assemble an adequate study sample. In this study we conducted a genome-wide association study on the largest, to date, set of European-descent never-smokers with lung cancer. Methods: We conducted a two-phase (discovery and replication) genome-wide association study in never-smokers of European descent. We further augmented the sample by performing a meta-analysis with never-smokers from the recent OncoArray study, which resulted in a total of 3636 cases and 6295 controls. We also compare our findings with those in smokers with lung cancer. Results: We detected three genome-wide statistically significant single nucleotide polymorphisms rs31490 (odds ratio [OR]: 0.769, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.722-0.820; p value 5.31 x 10(-16)), rs380286 (OR: 0.770, 95% CI: 0.723-0.820; p value 4.32 x 10(-16)), and rs4975616 OR: 0.778, 95% CI: 0.730-0.829; p value 1.04 x 10(-14)). All three mapped to Chromosome 5 CLPTM1L-TERT region, previously shown to be associated with lung cancer risk in smokers and in never-smoker Asian women, and risk of other cancers including breast, ovarian, colorectal, and prostate. Conclusions: We found that genetic susceptibility to lung cancer in never-smokers is associated to genetic variants with pan-cancer risk effects. The comparison with smokers shows that top variants previously shown to be associated with lung cancer risk only confer risk in the presence of tobacco exposure, underscoring the importance of gene-environment interactions in the etiology of this disease. (C) 2019 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)

    Large-scale association analysis identifies new lung cancer susceptibility loci and heterogeneity in genetic susceptibility across histological subtypes.

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    Although several lung cancer susceptibility loci have been identified, much of the heritability for lung cancer remains unexplained. Here 14,803 cases and 12,262 controls of European descent were genotyped on the OncoArray and combined with existing data for an aggregated genome-wide association study (GWAS) analysis of lung cancer in 29,266 cases and 56,450 controls. We identified 18 susceptibility loci achieving genome-wide significance, including 10 new loci. The new loci highlight the striking heterogeneity in genetic susceptibility across the histological subtypes of lung cancer, with four loci associated with lung cancer overall and six loci associated with lung adenocarcinoma. Gene expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in 1,425 normal lung tissue samples highlights RNASET2, SECISBP2L and NRG1 as candidate genes. Other loci include genes such as a cholinergic nicotinic receptor, CHRNA2, and the telomere-related genes OFBC1 and RTEL1. Further exploration of the target genes will continue to provide new insights into the etiology of lung cancer
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