928 research outputs found

    Quantification and qualification by in-situ FTIR of species formed on supported-cobalt catalysts during the Fischer-Tropsch reaction

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    We thanks the University of Aberdeen for a studentship (to A. McNab).Peer reviewedPostprintPostprin

    The digital transformation of research support

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    Workshop at Northern Collaboration 2017 Conference

    Gas-Phase Synthesis of Pyrazolo[3,4-<i>b</i>]pyridin-4-ones

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    Mechanistic Insights into the Desorption of Methanol and Dimethyl Ether Over ZSM-5 Catalysts

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    Acknowledgements Financial support from the Petroleum Technology Development Fund of Nigeria (PTDF/ED/PHD/OO/766/15) and from the European Commission in the scope of the 7th Framework program BIOGO project (Grant Number: 604296) https://www.biogo. eu/ is acknowledged.Peer reviewedPublisher PD

    The thermoregulatory effect of consuming a beverage containing protein during exercise

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    The State of the Region: Hampton Roads 2020

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    [From the introductory material] This is Old Dominion University’s 21st annual State of the Region Report. While it represents the work of many people connected in various ways to the university, the report does not constitute an official viewpoint of Old Dominion, its president, John R. Broderick, the Board of Visitors, the Strome College of Business or the generous donors who support the activities of the Dragas Center for Economic Analysis and Policy. Although our devotion to this work remains steadfast, our enthusiasm, admittedly, has been dampened by the COVID-19 pandemic and the toll it has taken on the region, Commonwealth and nation. In consideration of the national conversation on race and inequality, we have included additional material to shed light on how race affects economic outcomes in Hampton Roads. Hampton Roads plays a significant role in our nation’s national security, provides college education to thousands of Virginians, is working to adapt to sea level rise and is culturally diverse. There are challenges, of course, but, as the adage goes, challenge and opportunity are two sides of the same coin. To adapt, improve and overcome, we must understand where we are and where we want to go. Our work seeks to contribute to this conversation without glossing over the challenges we face

    The Costs of Carnivory

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    Mammalian carnivores fall into two broad dietary groups: smaller carnivores (<20 kg) that feed on very small prey (invertebrates and small vertebrates) and larger carnivores (>20 kg) that specialize in feeding on large vertebrates. We develop a model that predicts the mass-related energy budgets and limits of carnivore size within these groups. We show that the transition from small to large prey can be predicted by the maximization of net energy gain; larger carnivores achieve a higher net gain rate by concentrating on large prey. However, because it requires more energy to pursue and subdue large prey, this leads to a 2-fold step increase in energy expenditure, as well as increased intake. Across all species, energy expenditure and intake both follow a three-fourths scaling with body mass. However, when each dietary group is considered individually they both display a shallower scaling. This suggests that carnivores at the upper limits of each group are constrained by intake and adopt energy conserving strategies to counter this. Given predictions of expenditure and estimates of intake, we predict a maximum carnivore mass of approximately a ton, consistent with the largest extinct species. Our approach provides a framework for understanding carnivore energetics, size, and extinction dynamics
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