15 research outputs found

    The quick service food and beverage line of business and how it is aligned with the overall objectives for the Walt Disney World® Resort and The Walt Disney Company

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    The Disney College Program allows for many opportunities, such as instructor lead offerings, experiential learning, career path development, and academic support. This internship gives us hands-on work in a global company but also helps us further ourselves in our career by providing networking opportunities and behind-the-scenes access to things others may never experience. As an intern in Food and Beverage, it was my job to provide not just food but experiences to guests from all around the world. It was my job not only to make sure guests left the restaurant locations happy, but also to maximize production. To do this, all workers had to perform at their highest potential

    The quick service food and beverage line of business and how it is aligned with the overall objectives for the Walt Disney World® Resort and The Walt Disney Company

    Get PDF
    The Disney College Program allows for many opportunities, such as instructor lead offerings, experiential learning, career path development, and academic support. This internship gives us hands-on work in a global company but also helps us further ourselves in our career by providing networking opportunities and behind-the-scenes access to things others may never experience. As an intern in Food and Beverage, it was my job to provide not just food but experiences to guests from all around the world. It was my job not only to make sure guests left the restaurant locations happy, but also to maximize production. To do this, all workers had to perform at their highest potential

    Adverse Action Notices under the FCRA: The Supreme Court Provides Guidance

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    Environmental and Socio-Demographic Determinants of Dengue Fever in Colombo City, Sri Lanka

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    Dengue fever has increased exponentially in Sri Lanka, from 24.4 cases per 100,000 in 2003 to 165.3 per 100,000 population in 2013. Although early warning systems using predictor models have been previously developed in other settings, it is important to develop such models in each local setting. Further, the ability of these models to be applicable at smaller geographic units will enhance current vector control and disease surveillance measures. The aim of this paper was to identify environmental and socio-economic status (SES) risk factors that may predict dengue fever at the Gram Niladhari Divisions (GND) level (smallest administrative unit) in Colombo city, Sri Lanka. These factors included landcover classes, amount of vegetation, population density, water access and neighborhood SES as determined by roof type. A geographically weighted regression (GWR) was used to develop the prediction model. A total 55 GND units covering an area of 37 sq km were investigated. We found that GND units with decreased vegetation, higher built-up area, higher population density and poor access to tap-water supply were associated with high risk of dengue; the pertinent GND units were concentrated in the center of the city. This is the first study in Sri Lanka to include both environmental and socio-demographic factors in prediction models for dengue fever. The methodology may be useful in enhancing ongoing dengue fever control measures in the country, and to be extended to other countries in the region that have an increasing incidence of dengue fever

    The diversity of the Chagas parasite, <i>Trypanosoma cruzi</i>, infecting the main Central American vector, <i>Triatoma dimidiata</i>, from Mexico to Colombia

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    <div><p>Little is known about the strains of <i>Trypanosoma cruzi</i> circulating in Central America and specifically in the most important vector in this region, <i>Triatoma dimidiata</i>. Approximately six million people are infected with <i>T</i>. <i>cruzi</i>, the causative agent of Chagas disease, which has the greatest negative economic impact and is responsible for ~12,000 deaths annually in Latin America. By international consensus, strains of <i>T</i>. <i>cruzi</i> are divided into six monophyletic clades called discrete typing units (DTUs TcI-VI) and a seventh DTU first identified in bats called TcBat. TcI shows the greatest geographic range and diversity. Identifying strains present and diversity within these strains is important as different strains and their genotypes may cause different pathologies and may circulate in different localities and transmission cycles, thus impacting control efforts, treatment and vaccine development. To determine parasite strains present in <i>T</i>. <i>dimidiata</i> across its geographic range from Mexico to Colombia, we isolated abdominal DNA from <i>T</i>. <i>dimidiata</i> and determined which specimens were infected with <i>T</i>. <i>cruzi</i> by PCR. Strains from infected insects were determined by comparing the sequence of the 18S rDNA and the spliced-leader intergenic region to typed strains in GenBank. Two DTUs were found: 94% of infected <i>T</i>. <i>dimidiata</i> contained TcI and 6% contained TcIV. TcI exhibited high genetic diversity. Geographic structure of TcI haplotypes was evident by Principal Component and Median-Joining Network analyses as well as a significant result in the Mantel test, indicating isolation by distance. There was little evidence of association with TcI haplotypes and host/vector or ecotope. This study provides new information about the strains circulating in the most important Chagas vector in Central America and reveals considerable variability within TcI as well as geographic structuring at this large geographic scale. The lack of association with particular vectors/hosts or ecotopes suggests the parasites are moving among vectors/hosts and ecotopes therefore a comprehensive approach, such as the Ecohealth approach that makes houses refractory to the vectors will be needed to successfully halt transmission of Chagas disease.</p></div

    Median-Joining Network for the single nucleotide polymorphism region of the intergenic region of the spliced leader gene (SL-IR).

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    <p>Networks were constructed with 89—SL-IR haplotypes and the size of each node proportional to the frequency of the haplotype. Small red circles (median vectors) represent hypothetical intermediate nodes. TcBat is the outgroup. The number of mutational steps ≥3 are shown. Clustering is examined by: (A) geographic origin, (B) vector or host, and (C) ecotope.</p

    <i>Trypanosoma cruzi</i> strains TcI and TcIV identified in <i>Triatoma dimidiata</i> from Mexico, Central America and Colombia as determined by 18S rDNA and SL-IR (spliced leader intergenic region) sequences.

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    <p>Size of the circles is proportional to the numbers of <i>T</i>. <i>dimidiata</i> specimens with a particular <i>T</i>. <i>cruzi</i> strain (TcI -dark gray or TcIV—light gray) in different countries. Political map was modified from: <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Atlas_of_the_world#/media/File:BlankMap-World6.svg" target="_blank">https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Atlas_of_the_world#/media/File:BlankMap-World6.svg</a> under public domain.</p
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