669 research outputs found

    Mapping Occupational Therapy Practice with Postsecondary Students: A Scoping Review

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    Background: Legislation supports a role for occupational therapy in postsecondary settings, but this area is not a common practice area and the practice area is not well understood. This scoping review maps current literature of occupational therapists working with students in postsecondary settings in order to inform future research and practice. Method: After identifying included articles, a narrative description of the quantitative studies along with a concept map were completed. A qualitative thematic analysis of the articles was also conducted. Results: Twenty-five articles met the inclusion criteria. Quantitative results describe occupational therapy services as both a direct and indirect service provided through offices of disability services, assistive technology, and supported education programs, among others. The primary population with whom occupational therapists engage with are students with mental illness. Three qualitative themes emerged from the scoping review, including the focus on occupation and skills needed for success, using the campus environment, and campus collaboration. Conclusion: The structure of occupational therapy services varies from location to location and occupational therapists work with various populations of students. Future research needs to support the distinct value of occupational therapy in this practice area, including the scope and outcomes of occupational therapy services with different populations of students

    Elevating student understanding: Irish occupational therapy students’ experience of a service learning project

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    Service learning is a pedagogy that embraces learning in action and addresses community needs. Since the adoption of the Occupational Therapy Competencies in 2008 and the launch of national occupational therapist registration in Ireland in 2015, there has been limited research on the effectiveness of service learning pedagogies in Irish higher education for meeting core competencies. The majority of research focusing on evaluating service learning have been North American studies which brings to question the relevance of these service learning outcomes beyond North America and specifically Ireland. This qualitative study examined 11 occupational therapy students’ journal reflections, portfolio entries, and focus group discussions to illuminate their experience of participating in a peer coaching program called Elevate at a major Irish university. Results indicated the experience of working with a “buddy” allowed them to apply skills learned in the classroom to the “real world”, navigate between personal and professional boundaries, and struggle with “taking a step back” to empower the client. Students reported the experience helped them to prepare for future practice and increased their confidence going into clinical placement. Professional programs might consider service learning as a signature pedagogy, providing scaffolding between in-class activities and clinical placements and elevating student levels of understanding

    Promoting Mental Health Occupational Therapy in Higher Education: Lifestyle Redesign® for the College Student

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    Coming Out : The Occupational Impact for Gay Men

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    Student Perceptions of Online Video Cases to Promote Helping Skills Training

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    Video case based learning was integrated with multimodal online learning to facilitate helping skills training for graduate students. Five online cases were utilized before students participated in classroom-based role-plays and live practice. Students’ reactions to the activity were positive, and recommendations for counselor training are described

    Exploring Dating as an Occupation for Young Heterosexual Women in Ireland

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    Purpose – Dating is a meaningful occupation for many single people. The occupation of dating has transformed considerably in Ireland due to recent changes in Irish culture and the advent of online dating technology. The purpose of this study was to explore the complexities and intricacies of dating in an Irish context. Design/methodology/approach – A qualitative research approach was used and data were collected using semi-structured interviews with ten heterosexual women (age 24-34) living in urban areas of Ireland. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2006). Findings – Dating did not fully resonate with their experience, but they did not have an alternative term. The form of dating was influenced by cultural, temporal, physical and virtual contexts. Beliefs about dating, fluctuating emotions and feelings of mortification because of the stigma of online dating created meaning for participants and influenced their use of strategies to improve resilience. While dating was not a preferred occupation for participants because of its arduous nature and fluctuations in emotion, it was seen as essential to fulfil the function of finding a romantic partner or partner in occupation. Connections between participant experiences and occupational science are discussed to address the lexicon of dating and the form, function and meaning of dating. Originality/value – This study contributes to occupational science knowledge by revealing the occupational understandings of dating as an emerging and dynamic occupation in a rapidly changing culture of Ireland
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