15 research outputs found

    Inter-pregnancy Weight Change and Risks of Severe Birth-Asphyxia-Related Outcomes in Singleton Infants Born at Term: A Nationwide Swedish Cohort Study

    No full text
    <div><p>Background</p><p>Maternal overweight and obesity are associated with increased risks of birth-asphyxia-related outcomes, but the mechanisms are unclear. If a change of exposure (i.e., maternal body mass index [BMI]) over time influences risks, this would be consistent with a causal relationship between maternal BMI and offspring risks. Our objective was to investigate associations between changes in maternal BMI between consecutive pregnancies and risks of birth-asphyxia-related outcomes in the second offspring born at term.</p><p>Methods and Findings</p><p>This study was a prospective population-based cohort study that included 526,435 second-born term (≥37 wk) infants of mothers with two consecutive live singleton term births in Sweden between January 1992 and December 2012.</p><p>We estimated associations between the difference in maternal BMI between the first and second pregnancy and risks of low Apgar score (0–6) at 5 min, neonatal seizures, and meconium aspiration in the second-born offspring. Odds ratios (ORs) were adjusted for BMI at first pregnancy, maternal height, maternal age at second delivery, smoking, education, mother´s country of birth, inter-pregnancy interval, and year of second delivery. Analyses were also stratified by BMI (<25 versus ≥25 kg/m<sup>2</sup>) in the first pregnancy.</p><p>Risks of low Apgar score, neonatal seizures, and meconium aspiration increased with inter-pregnancy weight gain. Compared with offspring of mothers with stable weight (BMI change of −1 to <1 kg/m<sup>2</sup>), the adjusted OR for a low Apgar score in the offspring of mothers with a BMI change of 4 kg/m<sup>2</sup> or more was 1.33 (95% CI 1.12–1.58). The corresponding risks for neonatal seizures and meconium aspiration were 1.42 (95% CI 1.00–2.02) and 1.78 (95% CI 1.19–2.68), respectively. The increased risk of neonatal seizures related to weight gain appeared to be restricted to mothers with BMI < 25 kg/m<sup>2</sup> in the first pregnancy. A study limitation was the lack of data on the effects of obstetric interventions and neonatal resuscitation efforts.</p><p>Conclusions</p><p>Risks of birth-asphyxia-related outcomes increased with maternal weight gain between pregnancies. Preventing weight gain before and in between pregnancies may improve neonatal health.</p></div

    Maternal inter-pregnancy weight change and risks of low Apgar score (0–6) at 5 min, neonatal seizures, and meconium aspiration: live singleton second term infants of women in Sweden 1992–2012.

    No full text
    <p>Maternal inter-pregnancy weight change and risks of low Apgar score (0–6) at 5 min, neonatal seizures, and meconium aspiration: live singleton second term infants of women in Sweden 1992–2012.</p

    Maternal characteristics and rates of low Apgar scores (0–6), meconium aspiration, and neonatal seizures: live-born singleton second term infants of women in Sweden 1992–2012.

    No full text
    <p>Maternal characteristics and rates of low Apgar scores (0–6), meconium aspiration, and neonatal seizures: live-born singleton second term infants of women in Sweden 1992–2012.</p

    Maternal body-mass index and odds ratios for low Apgar scores at 5 and 10 minutes: live singleton term births in Sweden 1992–2010.

    No full text
    <p>In addition to regression models used in <a href="http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001648#pmed-1001648-t003" target="_blank">Table 3</a>, odds ratios are further adjusted for mode of delivery.</p

    Maternal characteristics and rates of low Apgar scores at 5 and 10 minutes in live singleton term births in Sweden 1992–2010.

    No full text
    <p>Maternal characteristics and rates of low Apgar scores at 5 and 10 minutes in live singleton term births in Sweden 1992–2010.</p

    Maternal body-mass index and odds ratios for meconium aspiration and neonatal seizures; live singleton term births in Sweden 1992–2010.

    No full text
    <p>In addition to regression models used in <a href="http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001648#pmed-1001648-t003" target="_blank">Table 3</a>, odds ratios are further adjusted for mode of delivery.</p

    Parental psychiatric history before delivery and RR of preterm birth.

    No full text
    RRs with 95% CIs were calculated using log-binomial regression models, adjusted for birth year by cubic natural splines with 5 knots. The dots in the figure represent RRs and lines represent 95% CIs. For psychiatric category “other,” upper 95% CI = 5.48. CI, confidence interval; P.hist, psychiatric history; RR, relative risk.</p

    Analysis plan.

    No full text
    BackgroundWomen with psychiatric diagnoses are at increased risk of preterm birth (PTB), with potential life-long impact on offspring health. Less is known about the risk of PTB in offspring of fathers with psychiatric diagnoses, and for couples where both parents were diagnosed. In a nationwide birth cohort, we examined the association between psychiatric history in fathers, mothers, and both parents and gestational age.Methods and findingsWe included all infants live-born to Nordic parents in 1997 to 2016 in Sweden. Psychiatric diagnoses were obtained from the National Patient Register. Data on gestational age were retrieved from the Medical Birth Register. Associations between parental psychiatric history and PTB were quantified by relative risk (RR) and two-sided 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from log-binomial regressions, by psychiatric disorders overall and by diagnostic categories. We extended the analysis beyond PTB by calculating risks over the whole distribution of gestational age, including “early term” (37 to 38 weeks).Among the 1,488,920 infants born throughout the study period, 1,268,507 were born to parents without a psychiatric diagnosis, of whom 73,094 (5.8%) were born preterm. 4,597 of 73,500 (6.3%) infants were born preterm to fathers with a psychiatric diagnosis, 8,917 of 122,611 (7.3%) infants were born preterm to mothers with a pscyhiatric diagnosis, and 2,026 of 24,302 (8.3%) infants were born preterm to both parents with a pscyhiatric diagnosis. We observed a shift towards earlier gestational age in offspring of parents with psychiatric history. The risks of PTB associated with paternal and maternal psychiatric diagnoses were similar for different psychiatric disorders. The risks for PTB were estimated at RR 1.12 (95% CI [1.08, 1.15] p p p p p p p p p p p p ConclusionsPaternal and maternal psychiatric history were associated with a shift to earlier gestational age and increased risk of births before full term. The risk consistently increased when fathers had a positive history of different psychiatric disorders, increased further when mothers were diagnosed and was highest when both parents were diagnosed.</div
    corecore