116,838 research outputs found

    Tunneling Spectroscopy of Two-level Systems Inside Josephson Junction

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    We consider a two-level (TL) system with energy level separation Omega_0 inside a Josephson junction. The junction is shunted by a resistor R and is current I (or voltage V = RI) biased. If the TL system modulates the Josephson energy and/or is optically active, it is Rabi driven by the Josephson oscillations in the running phase regime near the resonance 2eV = Omega_0. The Rabi oscillations, in turn, translate into oscillations of current and voltage which can be detected in noise measurements. This effect provides an option to fully characterize the TL systems and to find the TL's contribution to the decoherence when the junction is used as a qubit.Comment: 4 page

    Aerodynamic design and analysis of the AST-204, AST-205, and AST-206 blended wing-fuse large supersonic transport configuration concepts

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    The aerodynamic design and analysis of three blended wing-fuselage supersonic cruise configurations providing four, five, and six abreast seating was conducted using a previously designed supersonic cruise configuration as the baseline. The five abreast configuration was optimized for wave drag at a Mach number of 2.7. The four and six abreast configurations were also optimized at Mach 2.7, but with the added constraint that the majority of their structure be common with the five abreast configuration. Analysis of the three configurations indicated an improvement of 6.0, 7.5, and 7.7 percent in cruise lift-to-drag ratio over the baseline configuration for the four, five, and six abreast configurations, respectively

    Aerodynamic design and analysis of the AST-200 supersonic transport configuration concept

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    The design and analysis of a supersonic transport configuration was conducted using linear theory methods in conjunction with appropriate constraints. Wing optimization centered on the determination of the required twist and camber and proper integration of the wing and fuselage. Also included in the design are aerodynamic refinements to the baseline wing thickness distribution and nacelle shape. Analysis to the baseline and revised configurations indicated an improvement in lift-to-drag ratio of 0.36 at the Mach 2.7 cruise condition. Validation of the design is planned through supersonic wing tunnel tests

    The nature of operating flight loads and their effect on propulsion system structures

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    Past diagnostics studies revealed the primary causes of performance deterioration of high by-pass turbofan engines to be flight loads, erosion, and thermal distortion. The various types of airplane loads that are imposed on the engine throughout the lifetime of an airplane are examined. These include flight loads from gusts and maneuvers and ground loads from takeoff, landing, and taxi conditions. Clarification is made in definitions of the airframer's limit and ultimate design loads and the engine manufacturer's operating design loads. Finally, the influence of these loads on the propulsion system structures is discussed

    Mock galaxy catalogs using the quick particle mesh method

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    Sophisticated analysis of modern large-scale structure surveys requires mock catalogs. Mock catalogs are used to optimize survey design, test reduction and analysis pipelines, make theoretical predictions for basic observables and propagate errors through complex analysis chains. We present a new method, which we call "quick particle mesh", for generating many large-volume, approximate mock catalogs at low computational cost. The method is based on using rapid, low-resolution particle mesh simulations that accurately reproduce the large-scale dark matter density field. Particles are sampled from the density field based on their local density such that they have N-point statistics nearly equivalent to the halos resolved in high-resolution simulations, creating a set of mock halos that can be populated using halo occupation methods to create galaxy mocks for a variety of possible target classes.Comment: 13 pages, 16 figures. Matches version accepted by MNRAS. Code available at http://github.com/mockFactor

    Spatially Resolved Gas Kinematics within a Lyα\alpha Nebula: Evidence for Large-scale Rotation

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    We use spatially extended measurements of Lyα\alpha as well as less optically thick emission lines from an \approx80 kpc Lyα\alpha nebula at z1.67z\approx1.67 to assess the role of resonant scattering and to disentangle kinematic signatures from Lyα\alpha radiative transfer effects. We find that the Lyα\alpha, CIV, HeII, and CIII] emission lines all tell a similar story in this system, and that the kinematics are broadly consistent with large-scale rotation. First, the observed surface brightness profiles are similar in extent in all four lines, strongly favoring a picture in which the Lyα\alpha photons are produced in situ instead of being resonantly scattered from a central source. Second, we see low kinematic offsets between Lyα\alpha and the less optically thick HeII line (\sim100-200 km s1^{-1}), providing further support for the argument that the Lyα\alpha and other emission lines are all being produced within the spatially extended gas. Finally, the full velocity field of the system shows coherent velocity shear in all emission lines: \approx500 km s1^{-1} over the central \approx50 kpc of the nebula. The kinematic profiles are broadly consistent with large-scale rotation in a gas disk that is at least partially stable against collapse. These observations suggest that the Lyα\alpha nebula represents accreting material that is illuminated by an offset, hidden AGN or distributed star formation, and that is undergoing rotation in a clumpy and turbulent gas disk. With an implied mass of M(<R=20 kpc)3×1011\sim3\times10^{11} MM_{\odot}, this system may represent the early formation of a large Milky Way mass galaxy or galaxy group.Comment: Accepted to ApJ; 25 pages in emulateapj format; 15 figures, 4 table

    Toward a unified PNT, Part 1: Complexity and context: Key challenges of multisensor positioning

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    The next generation of navigation and positioning systems must provide greater accuracy and reliability in a range of challenging environments to meet the needs of a variety of mission-critical applications. No single navigation technology is robust enough to meet these requirements on its own, so a multisensor solution is required. Known environmental features, such as signs, buildings, terrain height variation, and magnetic anomalies, may or may not be available for positioning. The system could be stationary, carried by a pedestrian, or on any type of land, sea, or air vehicle. Furthermore, for many applications, the environment and host behavior are subject to change. A multi-sensor solution is thus required. The expert knowledge problem is compounded by the fact that different modules in an integrated navigation system are often supplied by different organizations, who may be reluctant to share necessary design information if this is considered to be intellectual property that must be protected
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