323 research outputs found

    How Unjust! An Experimental Investigation of Supervisors' Evaluation Errors and Agents' Incentives

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    In our simple model the supervisor: i) cannot observe the agent's effort; ii) aims at inducing the agent to exert high effort; but iii) can only offer rewards based on performance. Since performance is only stochastically related to effort, evaluation errors may occur. In particular, deserving agents that have exerted high effort may not be rewarded (Type I errors) and undeserving agents that have exerted low effort may be rewarded (Type II errors). We show that, although the model predicts both errors to be equally detrimental to performance, this prediction fails with a lab experiment. In fact, failing to reward deserving agents is significantly more detrimental than rewarding undeserving agents. We discuss our result in the light of some economic and managerial theories of behavior. Our result may have interesting implications for strategic human resource management and personnel economics and may also contribute to the debate about incentives and organizational performance.agency theory, organizational justice, compensation, type I and type II errors, real effort

    Lenient performance evaluations cause less damage than severe ones

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    Both hurt employee performance, but severity errors impact the perception of organisational justice, write Lucia Marchegiani, Tommaso Reggiani and Matteo Rizzoll

    Current Applications and Future Perspectives of Fluorescence Light Energy Biomodulation in Veterinary Medicine

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    The purpose of this review is to determine the state of the art of the mode of action and potential applications of fluorescence photobiomodulation in veterinary medicine. After a summary of the assets that have led the translation of such light-based therapies from bench side into clinical use, recent advances in canine dermatology using this brand-new approach are presented, and future scenarios where this type of care may provide benefits over the current standard care are highlighte

    The 5th edition of the Roma-BZCAT. A short presentation

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    The 5th edition of the Roma-BZCAT Multifrequency Catalogue of Blazars is available in a printed version and online at the ASDC website (http://www.asdc.asi.it/bzcat); it is also in the NED database. It presents several relevant changes with respect to the past editions which are briefly described in this paper.Comment: 5 pages, 3 figures. Accepted for publication in Astrophysics and Space Scienc

    Cibo e Nutraceutici: direzione salute

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    Atti congressuali del Convegno “Cibo e nutraceutici: direzione salute”, organizzato a Camerino il 10-07-2018, a cura della Piattaforme Tematiche di Ateneo su “Alimenti e Nutrizione” e “Salute Umana e Animale”

    Fluorescence Biomodulation for Canine Interdigital Furunculosis: Updates for Once-Weekly Schedule

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    Interdigital furunculosis is a common multifactorial, inflammatory disease of the canine interdigital skin in which lesions commonly become secondarily infected. Fluorescence biomodulation (FBM) administered twice weekly has shown to effectively control clinical manifestation as adjunct therapy to systemic antibiotic. Since twice weekly regimen could be unaffordable for some pet owners, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of once weekly application of FBM in combination with systemic antibiotic on clinical manifestations of canine interdigital pyoderma, comparing the results to those present in literature. Twelve dogs diagnosed with interdigital pyoderma received antibiotic plus once weekly FBM application. Dogs were scored until complete healing based on global lesion score and neutrophil engulfing bacterial score. The results obtained demonstrated that once weekly application of FBM exerts the same beneficial effect on interdigital furunculosis healing as per twice weekly, indicating that once weekly regimen is well tolerated and is yielding similar results to twice weekly applications

    Fluorescent Light Energy in the Management of Multi Drug Resistant Canine Pyoderma: A Prospective Exploratory Study

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    The increase in prevalence of staphylococcal antimicrobial resistance has been also associated with pyoderma in dogs, and prolonged antibiotic treatment, as often needed in severe cases of pyoderma, has been related to influencing possible development of multidrug resistance (MDR). Fluorescent light energy (FLE) has been indicated to improve pyoderma lesions as adjunct therapy to systemic antibiotics. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of FLE on clinical signs of MDR canine deep pyoderma (CDP) and interdigital furunculosis (CIF) when administered as solely management. Sixteen client-owned dogs affected by CIF (five dogs) and CDP (eleven dogs) were scored using a dedicated scoring system and received a single FLE applications twice weekly, until clinical resolution was achieved. Mean time to achieve complete resolution was 5.20 3.56 weeks (median 3 weeks) for CIF cases and 4.18 1.47 weeks (median 4 weeks) for CDP ones. FLE shows promise as an aid to managing clinical signs while reducing reliance on antibiotics for MDR CDP and CIF. In this study, FLE was responsible for the decrease in lesion scores and resolution of MDR pyoderma infection without any adjunct therapy, having a potential useful role to play in antibiotic stewardship programs, efficiently promoting complete clinical resolution of MDR lesions while optimizing the use of antibiotics

    The Effectiveness of Fluorescent Light Energy as Adjunct Therapy in Canine Deep Pyoderma: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    A single centre, single-blinded, prospective, randomized, controlled clinical study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of twice weekly fluorescent light energy therapy (Phovia™) as adjunct to systemic antibiotics in the management of deep pyoderma in dogs. Dogs with clinical lesions consistent with deep pyoderma, positive bacterial culture, and showing neutrophil engulfing bacteria at cytology were included in the study. Assessments were undertaken weekly for 8 weeks and every 2 weeks thereafter until 12 weeks after enrolment. At each visit, lesions were scored and cytology was conducted to determine a neutrophil engulfing bacteria score. All dogs (Groups A and B) were treated with systemic antibiotic twice daily, and Group B received additionally Phovia twice weekly. Median treatment duration was 11.7 weeks for Group A and 5.7 weeks for Group B. After 8 weeks of treatment, the percentage of dogs that achieved clinical resolution was 35.0% and 88.0% for Groups A and B, respectively. Lesion scores showed highly statistically significant difference in favour of Group B from week 3 to 8, and neutrophil engulfing bacteria scores showed statistical difference from week 2 onwards in favour of Group B. )ese results indicate that Phovia, when used as an adjunct to systemic antibiotics, can accelerate time to clinical resolution in cases of canine deep pyoderma
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