5 research outputs found

    Metabolomic evaluation of PGPR defence priming in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars infected with Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (stripe rust)

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    Plant-microbe interactions are a phenomenal display of symbiotic/parasitic relationships between living organisms. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are some of the most widely investigated plant-beneficial microbes due to their capabilities in stimulating plant growth and development and conferring protection to plants against biotic and abiotic stresses. As such, PGPR-mediated plant priming/induced systemic resistance (ISR) has become a hot topic among researchers, particularly with prospects of applications in sustainable agriculture. The current study applies untargeted ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-high-definition mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HDMS) to investigate PGPR-based metabolic reconfigurations in the metabolome of primed wheat plants against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tricti (Pst). A seed bio-priming approach was adopted, where seeds were coated with two PGPR strains namely Bacillus subtilis and Paenibacillus alvei (T22) and grown under controlled conditions in a glasshouse. The plants were infected with Pst one-week post-germination, followed by weekly harvesting of leaf material. Subsequent metabolite extraction was carried out for analysis on a UHPLC-HDMS system for data acquisition. The data was chemometrically processed to reveal the underlying trends and data structures as well as potential signatory biomarkers for priming against Pst. Results showed notable metabolic reprogramming in primary and secondary metabolism, where the amino acid and organic acid content of primed-control, primed-challenged and non-primed-challenged plants were differentially reprogrammed. Similar trends were observed from the secondary metabolism, in which primed plants (particularly primed-challenged) showed an up-regulation of phenolic compounds (flavonoids, hydroxycinnamic acids-HCAs- and HCA amides) compared to the non-primed plants. The metabolomics-based semi-quantitative and qualitative assessment of the plant metabolomes revealed a time-dependent metabolic reprogramming in primed-challenged and primed-unchallenged plants, indicating the metabolic adaptations of the plants to stripe rust infection over time

    Comparative Metabolite Profiling of Wheat Cultivars (Triticum aestivum) Reveals Signatory Markers for Resistance and Susceptibility to Stripe Rust and Aluminium (Al3+) Toxicity

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    Plants continuously produce essential metabolites that regulate their growth and development. The enrichment of specific metabolites determines plant interactions with the immediate environment, and some metabolites become critical in defence responses against biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, an untargeted UHPLC-qTOF-MS approach was employed to profile metabolites of wheat cultivars resistant or susceptible to the pathogen Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) and Aluminium (Al3+) toxicity. Multivariate statistical analysis (MVDA) tools, viz. principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HiCA) were used to qualify the correlation between the identified metabolites and the designated traits. A total of 100 metabolites were identified from primary and secondary metabolisms, including phenolic compounds, such as flavonoid glycosides and hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA) derivatives, fatty acids, amino acids, and organic acids. All metabolites were significantly variable among the five wheat cultivars. The Pst susceptible cultivars demonstrated elevated concentrations of HCAs compared to their resistant counterparts. In contrast, ‘Koonap’ displayed higher levels of flavonoid glycosides, which could point to its resistant phenotype to Pst and Al3+ toxicity. The data provides an insight into the metabolomic profiles and thus the genetic background of Pst- and Al3+-resistant and susceptible wheat varieties. This study demonstrates the prospects of applied metabolomics for chemotaxonomic classification, phenotyping, and potential use in plant breeding and crop improvement

    Rhizosphere Tripartite Interactions and PGPR-Mediated Metabolic Reprogramming towards ISR and Plant Priming: A Metabolomics Review

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    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are beneficial microorganisms colonising the rhizosphere. PGPR are involved in plant growth promotion and plant priming against biotic and abiotic stresses. Plant–microbe interactions occur through chemical communications in the rhizosphere and a tripartite interaction mechanism between plants, pathogenic microbes and plant-beneficial microbes has been defined. However, comprehensive information on the rhizosphere communications between plants and microbes, the tripartite interactions and the biochemical implications of these interactions on the plant metabolome is minimal and not yet widely available nor well understood. Furthermore, the mechanistic nature of PGPR effects on induced systemic resistance (ISR) and priming in plants at the molecular and metabolic levels is yet to be fully elucidated. As such, research investigating chemical communication in the rhizosphere is currently underway. Over the past decades, metabolomics approaches have been extensively used in describing the detailed metabolome of organisms and have allowed the understanding of metabolic reprogramming in plants due to tripartite interactions. Here, we review communication systems between plants and microorganisms in the rhizosphere that lead to plant growth stimulation and priming/induced resistance and the applications of metabolomics in understanding these complex tripartite interactions

    Comparative Metabolite Profiling of Wheat Cultivars (<i>Triticum aestivum</i>) Reveals Signatory Markers for Resistance and Susceptibility to Stripe Rust and Aluminium (Al<sup>3+</sup>) Toxicity

    No full text
    Plants continuously produce essential metabolites that regulate their growth and development. The enrichment of specific metabolites determines plant interactions with the immediate environment, and some metabolites become critical in defence responses against biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, an untargeted UHPLC-qTOF-MS approach was employed to profile metabolites of wheat cultivars resistant or susceptible to the pathogen Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) and Aluminium (Al3+) toxicity. Multivariate statistical analysis (MVDA) tools, viz. principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HiCA) were used to qualify the correlation between the identified metabolites and the designated traits. A total of 100 metabolites were identified from primary and secondary metabolisms, including phenolic compounds, such as flavonoid glycosides and hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA) derivatives, fatty acids, amino acids, and organic acids. All metabolites were significantly variable among the five wheat cultivars. The Pst susceptible cultivars demonstrated elevated concentrations of HCAs compared to their resistant counterparts. In contrast, ‘Koonap’ displayed higher levels of flavonoid glycosides, which could point to its resistant phenotype to Pst and Al3+ toxicity. The data provides an insight into the metabolomic profiles and thus the genetic background of Pst- and Al3+-resistant and susceptible wheat varieties. This study demonstrates the prospects of applied metabolomics for chemotaxonomic classification, phenotyping, and potential use in plant breeding and crop improvement

    DataSheet_1_Metabolomic evaluation of PGPR defence priming in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars infected with Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (stripe rust).docx

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    Plant-microbe interactions are a phenomenal display of symbiotic/parasitic relationships between living organisms. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are some of the most widely investigated plant-beneficial microbes due to their capabilities in stimulating plant growth and development and conferring protection to plants against biotic and abiotic stresses. As such, PGPR-mediated plant priming/induced systemic resistance (ISR) has become a hot topic among researchers, particularly with prospects of applications in sustainable agriculture. The current study applies untargeted ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-high-definition mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HDMS) to investigate PGPR-based metabolic reconfigurations in the metabolome of primed wheat plants against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tricti (Pst). A seed bio-priming approach was adopted, where seeds were coated with two PGPR strains namely Bacillus subtilis and Paenibacillus alvei (T22) and grown under controlled conditions in a glasshouse. The plants were infected with Pst one-week post-germination, followed by weekly harvesting of leaf material. Subsequent metabolite extraction was carried out for analysis on a UHPLC-HDMS system for data acquisition. The data was chemometrically processed to reveal the underlying trends and data structures as well as potential signatory biomarkers for priming against Pst. Results showed notable metabolic reprogramming in primary and secondary metabolism, where the amino acid and organic acid content of primed-control, primed-challenged and non-primed-challenged plants were differentially reprogrammed. Similar trends were observed from the secondary metabolism, in which primed plants (particularly primed-challenged) showed an up-regulation of phenolic compounds (flavonoids, hydroxycinnamic acids-HCAs- and HCA amides) compared to the non-primed plants. The metabolomics-based semi-quantitative and qualitative assessment of the plant metabolomes revealed a time-dependent metabolic reprogramming in primed-challenged and primed-unchallenged plants, indicating the metabolic adaptations of the plants to stripe rust infection over time.</p
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