407 research outputs found

    Studies on the germination of barley

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    I Studies on the Free Sugars of the Barley Grain. I. Historical Survey. J. Inst. Brew., 1952, 58, 270. || II Studies on the Free Sugars of the Barley Grain. II. Distribution of the Individual Sugar Fractions. J. Inst. Brew., 1952, 5§, 363. || Ill Studies on the Free Sugars of the Barley Grain. III. Changes in Sugar Content during Malting (with D. C. Travis and D.G. Wreay). J, Inst. Brew., 1953# 59# 154. || IV Studies on the Free Sugars of the Barley Grain. IV. Low-molecular Fructosans. J. Inst. Brew., 1953, 59, 462. || V Raffinose Metabolism in Germinating Barley. New Phytol., 1957, 56, 210. || VI Comparative Studies of Embryo and Endosperm (with H. McCorquodale). J. Inst. Brew.. 1958, 64, 112. || VII Cellulose Distribution in Barley (with J. P. Napier). J. Inst. Brew., 1959, 65, 188. || VIII Studies on the Free Sugars of the Barley Grain. V. Comparison of Sugars and Fructosans with those of other Cereals (with I. A. Preece). J. Inst. Brew., 1954, 60, 46. || IX Barley Carbohydrate Metabolism in Relation to Malting. Wallerstein Lab. Commun., I960, 25, 87. || X Lipid Metabolism in Germinating Barley. I. The Fats (with H. B. White). J. Inst. Brew., 1961, 67, 182. || XI Lipid Metabolism in Germinating Barley. II. Barley lipase (with H, B. White). J. Inst. Brew., 1962, 68, 487. || XII Water-soluble Carbohydrates of Seeds of the Gramineae (with H. McCorquodale). New Phytol., 1958, 57, 168. || XIII Trisaccharides of Lolium and Festuca (with H, McCorquodale). Nature, Lond., 1958, 182, 8.15 || XIV Hemicellulases of Bromus Seeds (with R. Sandie). New Phytol., 1961, 60, 117. || XV Effects of Gibberellic acid on Barley Endosperm (with A. S. Millar). J. Inst. Brew., 1962, 68, 522. || XVI Ultra-structure of Caryopses of the Gramineae. I. Aleurone and Central Endosperm of Bromus and Barley. (with C. S. Johnston and J. H. Duffus). J. Inst. Brew., 1964, JO, 505. || XVII Gibberellic Acid In the Germination of Barley (with J. H. Duffus and A. S. Millar). Proc. Eur. Brew. Conv. Brussels, 1965, 85. || XVIII Development of Hydrolytic Enzymes in Germinating Grain (with J. H, Duffus and C, S. Johnston). J. Inst. Brew.. 1964, JO, 521. || XIX The Embryo as an Activator of Gibberellic-acid-induced α-Amylase (with J. H. Duffus and D. J. L. Horsfall). J. Brew., 1966, 72, 36. || XX The Embryo of Barley in Relation to Endosperm Modification (with G. H. Palmer). J. Inst. Brew., 1966 (In press). || XXI On Barley. Trans, bot. Soc. Edinb., 1961, 39, 247. || XXII The Physiology of Malting. J. Inst. Brew., (in press)

    Intervening for exhaustion

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    "The search for psychosocial factors that contribute to the aetiology and course of coronary heart disease (CHD) has been an energetic, although not always fruitful, pursuit for more than half a century. Around 20 years ago, Appels [1] identified a prodromal constellation of symptoms, including physical exhaustion and feelings of hopelessness, that preceded major CHD events. It was hypothesized that this syndrome of “vital exhaustion” (VE) was a causal risk factor for CHD events, and several observational studies demonstrating prospective associations between VE and subsequent events have been adduced as supporting the hypothesis [2], [3], [4] and [5]. In a recent commentary, however, we discussed the difficulties inherent in drawing causal conclusions from observational evidence [6]. Applying general arguments that are by now very well rehearsed [7] and [8], we suggested that considerations such as confounding by common antecedents of both VE and CHD and reverse causation could not be readily dismissed and resolution was likely only following experimental studies. For example, an explanation of these prospective associations that regards CHD events as the result of inflammatory processes involved in the progress of atherosclerosis and VE as a consequence of such processes is just as parsimonious as one that regards VE as a causal risk. It is also equally, if not more, plausible biologically; there is now substantial evidence that inflammatory cytokines communicate with the central nervous system contributing to illness behaviour and experience and fostering feelings of depression and fatigue [9]. We also posed the question of what implications do the results of observational studies of VE hold for treatment [6]. Again, we would argue that in the absence of experimental evidence, the implications are extremely limited."\ud \u

    Vaccinia virus binds to the scavenger receptor MARCO on the surface of keratinocytes.

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    Patients with altered skin immunity, such as individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD), can have a life-threatening disruption of the epidermis known as eczema vaccinatum after vaccinia virus (VV) infection of the skin. Here, we sought to better understand the mechanism(s) by which VV associates with keratinocytes. The class A scavenger receptor known as MARCO (macrophage receptor with collagenous structure) is expressed on human and mouse keratinocytes and found to be abundantly expressed in the skin of patients with AD. VV bound directly to MARCO, and overexpression of MARCO increased susceptibility to VV infection. Furthermore, ligands with affinity for MARCO, or excess soluble MARCO, competitively inhibited VV infection. These findings indicate that MARCO promotes VV infection and highlights potential new therapeutic strategies for prevention of VV infection in the skin

    A Single Leaf: Tolkien\u27s Visual Art and Fantasy

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    A look into Tolkien’s thoughts on creativity, not just through “On Fairy-stories” and “Leaf by Niggle,” as one might expect, but also through Tolkien’s visual art. The authors discuss and demonstrate how MacLeod’s own art was influenced by Tolkien’s philosophy of sub-creation. Illustrated with six photos, sketches, and completed paintings by MacLeod

    Stressful life-events exposure is associated with 17-year mortality, but it is health-related events that prove predictive

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    Objectives Despite the widely-held view that psychological stress is a major cause of poor health, few studies have examined the relationship between stressful life-events exposure and death. The present analyses examined the association between overall life-events stress load, health-related and health-unrelated stress, and subsequent all-cause mortality.\ud \ud Design This study employed a prospective longitudinal design incorporating time-varying covariates.\ud \ud Methods Participants were 968 Scottish men and women who were 56 years old. Stressful life-events experience for the preceding 2 years was assessed at baseline, 8–9 years and 12–13 years later. Mortality was tracked for the subsequent 17 years during which time 266 participants had died. Cox's regression models with time-varying covariates were applied. We adjusted for sex, occupational status, smoking, BMI, and systolic blood pressure.\ud \ud Results Overall life-events numbers and their impact scores at the time of exposure and the time of assessment were associated with 17-year mortality. Health-related event numbers and impact scores were strongly predictive of mortality. This was not the case for health-unrelated events.\ud \ud Conclusions The frequency of life-events and the stress load they imposed were associated with all-cause mortality. However, it was the experience and impact of health-related, not health-unrelated, events that proved predictive. This reinforces the need to disaggregate these two classes of exposures in studies of stress and health outcomes.\u

    Disembodied, dehumanised but safe and feasible : the social-spatial flow of a pandemic OSCE

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    Acknowledgements The authors wish to thank all those who took part in the OSCE under study and who contributed their time to be interviewed.Peer reviewedPublisher PD

    How an Arts-Based Clinical Skills Set Can Be Assessed During OSCEs

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    Background: Arts-based activities’ roles in medical education is to challenge students to cultivate clinical skills using ART (aesthetics, reflection, time). ART activities offer opportunities for students to cultivate creative dimensions of their clinical skills and to reflect on their responses to uncertainty and ambiguity. Faculty, however, are challenged to structure these learning activities in diverse, sometimes unfamiliar, health care settings. Methods: This study explored preclerkship medical students’ responses to participating in ART activities presented in the common medical educational format of an objective structured clinical exam (OSCE). Activities included interpreting fine art (eg, images and poetry) and drawing a simulated patient. The discussion section transcript and student sketchbooks were analyzed to identify themes related to participating in the study. Results: Use of arts-based activities elicited behaviors similar to those observed in students’ responses to formal summative OSCEs, although students also wrestled with challenges and expressed their subjective impressions. Conclusions: This study offers an arts-based tool set capable of being delivered within the familiar medical education setting and established structure of the OSCE

    An Analysis of Leadership Styles Adopted by Women in Top Leaders Positions.

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    ───────────────────────────────────────── An Analysis of Leadership Styles Adopted by Women in Top Leaders Positions. by Anna Mary MacLeod Student ID Number: 4336829 Year of Publication: 2019 Word Count: 14929 A Dissertation presented in part consideration for the degree of "Management MSc". University of Nottingham Business School. ─────────────────────────────────────────   Abstract Women seem to struggle to obtain senior leadership roles within companies, particularly successful companies like those on the Fortune 500 list. Academic literature and the media have focused on this issue, aiming to understand why women fail to reach senior management levels. A range of theories and viewpoints are discussed in this paper, focusing on the discussion about whether women are able to lead and what leadership approach or style is most suitable to them. The aim of the dissertation is to understand which leadership approach women in senior leadership roles typically adopt. The dissertation uses interviews with women from the Forbes list of the most powerful businesswomen in the world to examine their leadership approach. It uses a thematic analysis, coding the interviews with predetermined codes to understand which leadership styles, Transformational or Transactional, are present within the women’s interviews. Results from the investigation suggest female leaders in the private business sector are more likely to adopt a more Transformational Leadership approach. However, it also finds women are most likely to use results to determine the success of their business, a key aspect of Transactional Leadership. The study also suggests that women’s leadership styles are not affected by their job history but may be affected by the industry they work in (e.g. the Technology Services industry and the Media industry)
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