48 research outputs found

    Effects of Competitive Level and Gender on Anthropometric Profile and Physiological Attributes in Kickboxers

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    The aim of the study was to compare kickboxing competitive levels and genders in anthropometric, physical and physiological attributes. The sample was composed of four groups (subelite: 6 men and 4 women; amateur: 10 men and 8 women). Anthropometric measurements, 20-meter Shuttle Run aerobic test, Countermovement Jump (CMJ), Medicine Ball Throw (MBT), Bench Press and Back Squat Maximal Strength and Wingate-test for upper (UB) and lower-body (LB) before were used. We found that the subelite male and female kickboxers achieved significantly higher UB (male: subelite = 6.1±0.6 and 7.6±0.8 vs. 5.2±0.7 and 6.5±0.9 W.kg–1, respectively; female: subelite = 4.8±0.6 and 5.9±0.8 vs. amateur = 3.7±0.8 and 4.1±1.1 W.kg–1, respectively), LB mean and peak power (male: subelite = 8.5±0.9 and 10.9±0.9 vs. 7.1±1.1 and 9.3±1.2 W.kg–1, respectively; female: subelite = 6.5±0.8 and 8.6±1.1 vs. amateur = 5.3±0.9 and 6.7±1.4 W.kg–1, respectively). MBT (male: subelite = 4.6±0.3 vs. amateur = 4.1±0.4 m; female: subelite = 3.9±0.4 vs. amateur = 3.2±0.5 m) and maximal oxygen uptake (male: subelite = 54.6±4.3 vs. amateur = 49.1±4.6 ml.min–1.kg–1; female: subelite = 47.6±3.2 vs. amateur = 42.2±3.8 ml.min–1.kg–1) than amateur kickboxers. The effects demonstrated significant difference between male and female amateur kickboxers for anthropometric, physical and physiological performance (P<0.05) and a sexual dimorphism when compared the female subelite level with male groups. The performance of male and female kickboxers primarily depends on the anaerobic alactic and aerobic power

    Effects of Competitive Level and Gender on Anthropometric Profile and Physiological Attributes in Kickboxers

    Get PDF
    The aim of the study was to compare kickboxing competitive levels and genders in anthropometric, physical and physiological attributes. The sample was composed of four groups (subelite: 6 men and 4 women; amateur: 10 men and 8 women). Anthropometric measurements, 20-meter Shuttle Run aerobic test, Countermovement Jump (CMJ), Medicine Ball Throw (MBT), Bench Press and Back Squat Maximal Strength and Wingate-test for upper (UB) and lower-body (LB) before were used. We found that the subelite male and female kickboxers achieved significantly higher UB (male: subelite = 6.1±0.6 and 7.6±0.8 vs. 5.2±0.7 and 6.5±0.9 W.kg–1, respectively; female: subelite = 4.8±0.6 and 5.9±0.8 vs. amateur = 3.7±0.8 and 4.1±1.1 W.kg–1, respectively), LB mean and peak power (male: subelite = 8.5±0.9 and 10.9±0.9 vs. 7.1±1.1 and 9.3±1.2 W.kg–1, respectively; female: subelite = 6.5±0.8 and 8.6±1.1 vs. amateur = 5.3±0.9 and 6.7±1.4 W.kg–1, respectively). MBT (male: subelite = 4.6±0.3 vs. amateur = 4.1±0.4 m; female: subelite = 3.9±0.4 vs. amateur = 3.2±0.5 m) and maximal oxygen uptake (male: subelite = 54.6±4.3 vs. amateur = 49.1±4.6 ml.min–1.kg–1; female: subelite = 47.6±3.2 vs. amateur = 42.2±3.8 ml.min–1.kg–1) than amateur kickboxers. The effects demonstrated significant difference between male and female amateur kickboxers for anthropometric, physical and physiological performance (P<0.05) and a sexual dimorphism when compared the female subelite level with male groups. The performance of male and female kickboxers primarily depends on the anaerobic alactic and aerobic power

    A Meta-Analysis to Determine Strength Training Related Dose-Response Relationships for Lower-Limb Muscle Power Development in Young Athletes

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    It is well-documented that strength training (ST) improves measures of muscle strength in young athletes. Less is known on transfer effects of ST on proxies of muscle power and the underlying dose-response relationships. The objectives of this meta-analysis were to quantify the effects of ST on lower limb muscle power in young athletes and to provide dose-response relationships for ST modalities such as frequency, intensity, and volume. A systematic literature search of electronic databases identified 895 records. Studies were eligible for inclusion if (i) healthy trained children (girls aged 6–11 y, boys aged 6–13 y) or adolescents (girls aged 12–18 y, boys aged 14–18 y) were examined, (ii) ST was compared with an active control, and (iii) at least one proxy of muscle power [squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump height (CMJ)] was reported. Weighted mean standardized mean differences (SMDwm) between subjects were calculated. Based on the findings from 15 statistically aggregated studies, ST produced significant but small effects on CMJ height (SMDwm = 0.65; 95% CI 0.34–0.96) and moderate effects on SJ height (SMDwm = 0.80; 95% CI 0.23–1.37). The sub-analyses revealed that the moderating variable expertise level (CMJ height: p = 0.06; SJ height: N/A) did not significantly influence ST-related effects on proxies of muscle power. “Age” and “sex” moderated ST effects on SJ (p = 0.005) and CMJ height (p = 0.03), respectively. With regard to the dose-response relationships, findings from the meta-regression showed that none of the included training modalities predicted ST effects on CMJ height. For SJ height, the meta-regression indicated that the training modality “training duration” significantly predicted the observed gains (p = 0.02), with longer training durations (&gt;8 weeks) showing larger improvements. This meta-analysis clearly proved the general effectiveness of ST on lower-limb muscle power in young athletes, irrespective of the moderating variables. Dose-response analyses revealed that longer training durations (&gt;8 weeks) are more effective to improve SJ height. No such training modalities were found for CMJ height. Thus, there appear to be other training modalities besides the ones that were included in our analyses that may have an effect on SJ and particularly CMJ height. ST monitoring through rating of perceived exertion, movement velocity or force-velocity profile could be promising monitoring tools for lower-limb muscle power development in young athletes

    The Effects of Physical Training on Quality of Life, Aerobic Capacity, and Cardiac Function in Older Patients With Heart Failure: A Meta-Analysis

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    Aim: The purposes of this meta-analysis were to quantify the effectiveness of physical training on quality of life (QoL), aerobic capacity, and cardiac functioning in older patients with heart failure (HF) and evaluate dose–response relationships of training variables (frequency, volume, and duration).Methods: Scholarly databases (e.g., PubMed/MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and Scopus) were searched, identifying randomized controlled trials that investigated the effectiveness of different training modes on QoL (assessed by the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire), aerobic capacity (assessed by the 6 min walk test) and cardiac function (assessed by left ventricular ejection fraction).Results: Twenty five studies were included with a total of 2,409 patients. Results showed that exercise training improved total QoL (small ES = −0.69; 95% CI −1.00 to 0.38; p &lt; 0.001), aerobic capacity (small ES = 0.47; 95% CI 0.15–0.71; p = 0.002) and cardiac function (moderate ES = 0.91; 95% CI 0.37–1.45; p = 0.001). In addition, univariate analyses revealed the moderating variable ‘training mode' significantly influenced aerobic capacity (Q = 9.97; p = 0.007), whereby, resistance training had the greatest effect (ES = 1.71; 95% CI 1.03–2.39; p &lt; 0.001), followed by aerobic training (ES = 0.51; 95% CI 0.30–0.72; p &lt; 0.001), and combined training (ES = 0.15; 95% CI −0.24 to 0.53; p = 0.45). Meta-regression analysis showed that only the duration of an intervention predicted the effect of physical training on QoL (coefficient = −0.027; p = 0.006), with shorter training durations (12 weeks) showing larger improvements.Conclusion: The present meta-analysis showed that physical training has positive effects on QoL, aerobic capacity, and cardiac function in older patients with HF. Practitioners should consider both training volume and mode when designing physical training programs in order to improve QoL and aerobic capacity in older patients with HF

    Rapid Weight Loss of Up to Five Percent of the Body Mass in Less Than 7 Days Does Not Affect Physical Performance in Official Olympic Combat Athletes With Weight Classes: A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis

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    Given the relevance of the effects that weight loss can generate on the physical performance in athletes, this study performed a systematic review with meta-analysis of the published literature on rapid weight loss (RWL) and examined its impact on the physical performance in Official Olympic combat sports athletes. The “Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis” (PRISMA) guidelines were followed to ensure an ethical and complete reporting of the findings. PubMed, SPORT Discus, and EBSCO were the electronic databases explored for article retrieval and selection. The following string was applied: “RWL” OR “weight loss” OR “weight reduction” AND “judo” OR “wrestling” or “taekwondo” or “boxing” AND “performance.” Based on the quality analysis, conducted according to the “Tool for the assessment of study quality and reporting in exercise training studies” (TESTEX), ten articles achieved a score >6 points. The meta-analysis showed a significant difference in pre- vs. postweight loss (p = 0.003) and no effects in pre- vs. post-power and strength performance analysis (p > 0.05 for both results). Based on our systematic review and metaanalysis of the literature, RWL up to ≤5% of the body mass in less than 7 days does not influence performance outcomes in Official Olympic combat athletes with weight classes, considering the strength and power measures
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