86 research outputs found

    Joint Language Semantic and Structure Embedding for Knowledge Graph Completion

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    The task of completing knowledge triplets has broad downstream applications. Both structural and semantic information plays an important role in knowledge graph completion. Unlike previous approaches that rely on either the structures or semantics of the knowledge graphs, we propose to jointly embed the semantics in the natural language description of the knowledge triplets with their structure information. Our method embeds knowledge graphs for the completion task via fine-tuning pre-trained language models with respect to a probabilistic structured loss, where the forward pass of the language models captures semantics and the loss reconstructs structures. Our extensive experiments on a variety of knowledge graph benchmarks have demonstrated the state-of-the-art performance of our method. We also show that our method can significantly improve the performance in a low-resource regime, thanks to the better use of semantics. The code and datasets are available at https://github.com/pkusjh/LASS.Comment: COLING 202

    DynamicLight: Dynamically Tuning Traffic Signal Duration with DRL

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    Deep reinforcement learning (DRL) is becoming increasingly popular in implementing traffic signal control (TSC). However, most existing DRL methods employ fixed control strategies, making traffic signal phase duration less flexible. Additionally, the trend of using more complex DRL models makes real-life deployment more challenging. To address these two challenges, we firstly propose a two-stage DRL framework, named DynamicLight, which uses Max Queue-Length to select the proper phase and employs a deep Q-learning network to determine the duration of the corresponding phase. Based on the design of DynamicLight, we also introduce two variants: (1) DynamicLight-Lite, which addresses the first challenge by using only 19 parameters to achieve dynamic phase duration settings; and (2) DynamicLight-Cycle, which tackles the second challenge by actuating a set of phases in a fixed cyclical order to implement flexible phase duration in the respective cyclical phase structure. Numerical experiments are conducted using both real-world and synthetic datasets, covering four most commonly adopted traffic signal intersections in real life. Experimental results show that: (1) DynamicLight can learn satisfactorily on determining the phase duration and achieve a new state-of-the-art, with improvement up to 6% compared to the baselines in terms of adjusted average travel time; (2) DynamicLight-Lite matches or outperforms most baseline methods with only 19 parameters; and (3) DynamicLight-Cycle demonstrates high performance for current TSC systems without remarkable modification in an actual deployment. Our code is released at Github.Comment: 9 pages, 5figure

    Transcriptome Analyses Reveal Adult Metabolic Syndrome With Intrauterine Growth Restriction in Pig Models

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    Epidemiological data have indicated that intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is a risk factor for the adult metabolic syndrome in pigs. However, the causative genetic mechanism leading to the phenotype in adulthood has not been well characterized. In the present study, both normal and IUGR adult pigs were used as models to survey the differences in global gene expression in livers through transcriptome sequencing. The transcriptome libraries generated 104.54 gb of data. In normal and IUGR pigs, 16,948 and 17,078 genes were expressed, respectively. A total of 1,322 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified. Enrichment analysis of the DEGs revealed that the top overrepresented gene ontology (GO) terms and pathways were related to oxidoreductase activity, ATPase activity, amino catabolic process, glucose metabolism, and insulin signaling pathway. The increased gluconeogenesis (GNG) and decreased glycogen synthesis in the liver contributed to the glucose intolerance observed in IUGR. The reduced expression of insulin signaling genes (such as PI3K and AKT) indicated an elevated risk of diabetes in adulthood. Together, these findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms of adult IUGR pigs and valuable information for future studies of therapeutic intervention in IUGR metabolic syndrome

    Screening and fermentation medium optimization of a strain favorable to Rice–fish Coculture

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    Rice–fish coculture (RF) is a small ecosystem in which microorganisms are widely distributed in the fish, water environment, soil, and plants. In order to study the positive effects of microorganisms on common carp and rice in the RF ecosystem, a total of 18 strains with growth-promoting ability were screened from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) gut contents, among which three strains had the ability to produce both DDP-IV inhibitors and IAA. The strain with the strongest combined ability, FYN-22, was identified physiologically, biochemically, and by 16S rRNA, and it was initially identified as Bacillus licheniformis. As the number of metabolites secreted by the strain under natural conditions is not sufficient for production, the FYN-22 fermentation medium formulation was optimized by means of one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) experiments and response surface methodology (RSM). The results showed that, under the conditions of a soluble starch concentration of 10.961 g/l, yeast concentration of 2.366 g/l, NH4Cl concentration of 1.881 g/l, and FeCl3 concentration of 0.850 g/l, the actual measured number of FYN-22 spores in the fermentation broth was 1.913 × 109 CFU/ml, which was 2.575-fold improvement over the pre-optimization value. The optimized fermentation solution was used for the immersion operation of rice seeds, and, after 14 days of incubation in hydroponic boxes, the FYN-22 strain was found to have a highly significant enhancement of 48.31% (p < 0.01) on the above-ground part of rice, and different degrees of effect on root length, fresh weight, and dry weight (16.73, 17.80, and 21.97%, respectively; p < 0.05). This study may provide new insights into the fermentation process of Bacillus licheniformis FYN-22 and its further utilization in RF systems

    miR-144-3p Promotes Adipogenesis Through Releasing C/EBPα From Klf3 and CtBP2

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    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs, have been proved as novel and potent regulators of adipogenesis. A previous study has found out that miR-144-3p was a biomarker of type 2 diabetes, but the role of miR-144-3p in regulating adipogenesis was still unclear. In the present study, the expression of miR-144-3p increased in obese mice and during the 3T3-L1 differentiation process. Overexpression of miR-144-3p suppressed the expression of cell cycle regulatory factors and inhibited pre-adipocytes proliferation. Besides, overexpression of miR-144-3p accelerated lipid accumulation in adipocytes and positively regulated adipogenesis, which was also accompanied by increasing the expression of genes related to fatty acid synthesis and decreasing the expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation. Furthermore, luciferase activity assays indicated that miR-144-3p directly targeted Klf3 and CtBP2. The process was also confirmed by the mRNA and protein expression of Klf3 and CtBP2, which were suppressed by miR-144-3p. Furthermore, miR-144-3p targeting Klf3/CtBP2 would induce C/EBPα activity by releasing corepressors (Klf3 and CtBP2) from its promoter region. Moreover, we also observed that miR-144-3p could promote adipogenesis in mice injected with miR-144-3p agomir through tail-vein injection. Taken together, these results support that miR-144-3p can facilitate adipogenesis both in vitro and in vivo, which implies that miR-144-3p could be a target for therapeutic intervention in obesity and metabolic syndrome in the future

    The Landscape of Non-Coding RNA in an Adult Pig Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction

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    Background/Aims: Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a risk factor for adult metabolic syndrome, but how this disease is regulated by lncRNAs and circRNAs remains elusive. Methods: Here, we employed adult IUGR and normal pigs as models to evaluate the expression of various global lncRNAs and circRNAs in pig livers using RNA-seq. Results: In total, we obtained 1,162 million raw reads of approximately 104.54 Gb high quality data. After a strict five-step filtering process, 3,368 lncRNAs were identified, including 300 differentially expressed lncRNAs (p < 0.05) in the IUGR group relative to the control group. The cis-regulatory analysis identified target genes that were enriched in specific GO terms and pathways (p < 0.05), including amino acid metabolism, oxidoreductase activity, PPAR signaling pathway, and insulin signaling pathway. These are closely related to the observed phenotypes of increased gluconeogenesis and impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in adulthood of the IUGR group. Additionally, we also identified 403 circRNAs, of which 44 were differentially expressed (p < 0.05). Interestingly, our results identified ATF4-miR214-circRNA7964 and TCF7-miR22-3p-circRNA16347 as two competing endogenous networks, which were closely associated with the observed increase in hepatic gluconeogenesis in the IUGR group. Conclusion: Together, this study reveals a multitude of candidate lncRNAs and circRNAs involved in the development of IUGR pigs, which could facilitate further researches on the molecular mechanisms of metabolic syndrome

    Short-term dietary choline supplementation alters the gut microbiota and liver metabolism of finishing pigs

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    Choline is an essential nutrient for pig development and plays a role in the animal's growth performance, carcass characteristics, and reproduction aspects in weaned pigs and sows. However, the effect of choline on finishing pigs and its potential regulatory mechanism remains unclear. Here, we feed finishing pigs with 1% of the hydrochloride salt of choline, such as choline chloride (CHC), under a basic diet condition for a short period of time (14 days). A 14-day supplementation of CHC significantly increased final weight and carcass weight while having no effect on carcass length, average backfat, or eye muscle area compared with control pigs. Mechanically, CHC resulted in a significant alteration of gut microbiota composition in finishing pigs and a remarkably increased relative abundance of bacteria contributing to growth performance and health, including Prevotella, Ruminococcaceae, and Eubacterium. In addition, untargeted metabolomics analysis identified 84 differently abundant metabolites in the liver between CHC pigs and control pigs, of which most metabolites were mainly enriched in signaling pathways related to the improvement of growth, development, and health. Notably, there was no significant difference in the ability of oxidative stress resistance between the two groups, although increased bacteria and metabolites keeping balance in reactive oxygen species showed in finishing pigs after CHC supplementation. Taken together, our results suggest that a short-term supplementation of CHC contributes to increased body weight gain and carcass weight of finishing pigs, which may be involved in the regulation of gut microbiota and alterations of liver metabolism, providing new insights into the potential of choline-mediated gut microbiota/metabolites in improving growth performance, carcass characteristics, and health

    Effects of dietary L-Citrulline supplementation on growth performance, meat quality, and fecal microbial composition in finishing pigs

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    Gut microbiota play an important role in the gut ecology and development of pigs, which is always regulated by nutrients. This study investigated the effect of L-Citrulline on growth performance, carcass characteristics, and its potential regulatory mechanism. The results showed that 1% dietary L-Citrulline supplementation for 52 days significantly increased final weight, liveweight gain, carcass weight, and average backfat and markedly decreased drip loss (p < 0.05) of finishing pigs compared with the control group. Microbial analysis of fecal samples revealed a marked increase in α-diversity and significantly altered composition of gut microbiota in finishing pigs in response to L-Citrulline. In particular, these altered gut microbiota at the phylum and genus level may be mainly involved in the metabolic process of carbohydrate, energy, and amino acid, and exhibited a significant association with final weight, carcass weight, and backfat thickness. Taken together, our data revealed the potential role of L-Citrulline in the modulation of growth performance, carcass characteristics, and the meat quality of finishing pigs, which is most likely associated with gut microbiota

    Lysophosphatidic Acid Acyltransferase β (LPAATβ) Promotes the Tumor Growth of Human Osteosarcoma

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    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone with poorly characterized molecular pathways important in its pathogenesis. Increasing evidence indicates that elevated lipid biosynthesis is a characteristic feature of cancer. We sought to investigate the role of lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase β (LPAATβ, aka, AGPAT2) in regulating the proliferation and growth of human osteosarcoma cells. LPAATβ can generate phosphatidic acid, which plays a key role in lipid biosynthesis as well as in cell proliferation and survival. Although elevated expression of LPAATβ has been reported in several types of human tumors, the role of LPAATβ in osteosarcoma progression has yet to be elucidated.Endogenous expression of LPAATβ in osteosarcoma cell lines is analyzed by using semi-quantitative PCR and immunohistochemical staining. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of LPAATβ and silencing LPAATβ expression is employed to determine the effect of LPAATβ on osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration in vitro and osteosarcoma tumor growth in vivo. We have found that expression of LPAATβ is readily detected in 8 of the 10 analyzed human osteosarcoma lines. Exogenous expression of LPAATβ promotes osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration, while silencing LPAATβ expression inhibits these cellular characteristics. We further demonstrate that exogenous expression of LPAATβ effectively promotes tumor growth, while knockdown of LPAATβ expression inhibits tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft model of human osteosarcoma.Our results strongly suggest that LPAATβ expression may be associated with the aggressive phenotypes of human osteosarcoma and that LPAATβ may play an important role in regulating osteosarcoma cell proliferation and tumor growth. Thus, targeting LPAATβ may be exploited as a novel therapeutic strategy for the clinical management of osteosarcoma. This is especially attractive given the availability of selective pharmacological inhibitors

    The Ninth Visual Object Tracking VOT2021 Challenge Results

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