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    Christianity and Gambling: An Introduction

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    Religions hold complex relations with games and, in particular, with gambling. The article focuses on Christianity. On the one hand, the history of this religion shows a tendency to condemn games as source of distraction from spiritual rectitude and to stigmatize gambling, above all, as opening to metaphysical randomness and, as a consequence, as challenge to the idea of divine omniscience. On the other hand, Christianity has also sought to reinterpret games, and even gambling, as possible occasion for moral improvement and as useful distraction from the hardship of monastic life. A theological perspective that reaches its peak in Thomas Aquinas, but has its roots in Aristotle’s evaluation of playfulness, tends to suggest the need for eutropelia, meant as the citizens’ virtue to appropriately have fun

    The Observer Actant in the Contemporary Legal Discourse: A Semiotic Meditation

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    The Semiotics of the Anti-COVID-19 Mask

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    Protest in Berlin: A Semiotic Reading

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    Massimo LeoneProtest in Berlin. A Semiotic Readin

    On Aniconicity

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    The Limits of Digital Interpretation: Semantic Versus Syntactic Connectedness

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    Waves and Faces: Notes for a Semiotic Oceanography

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    Melbourne versus Sydney: Semiotic Reflections on First and Second Cities

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    Urban marketing has recently been adopting the concept, and the label, of “second city”. However, this concept requires sharper theoretical definition in order to turn heuristic. Thus far, it has been conceived in relation to an “ideology of ranking”, strictly related to the worldview of post-modern globalization. A more fruitful definition of “second cities” results from Charles S. Peirce’s idea of secondness: a city is second to another not in quantitative, but in qualitative and relational terms. The semiotic model of Jurij M. Lotman offers a suitable methodology to analyse this relational definition, as it is exemplified by the case-study of the rivalry between Melbourne and Sydney. A historical survey of their relation shows that the latter progressively embraced an identity of “secondness” so as to successfully market an alternative vision of urban life. Melbourne therefore provides a model for non-quantitative construction of urban distinctiveness

    Concluding Remarks

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    Nature and Culture in Visual Communication: Japanese Variations on _Ludus Naturae_

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