594 research outputs found

    A good professional reputation is in the eye of the beholder

    Get PDF
    Reputation is audience-specific, write Gokhan Ertug, Tamar Yogev, Yonghoon Lee and Peter Hedströ

    (Main Section: Ecological Planning)

    Get PDF
    Wetlands are being negatively affected by various human activities such as reclamation, construction of levees, and conventional agricultural activities. Upo Wetland is the largest inland wetland in the Republic of Korea (hereinafter Korea). It has not only been designated as a wetland protection area by the Wetland Conservation Act of Korea but also registered as a Ramsar Site in 1998. In this study, cognitive mapping of the Upo Wetland and surrounding areas was applied to identify sensitive and vulnerable areas that should be carefully managed. The results of the cognitive mapping were compared with existing land-use zones of the wetland conservation area. Furthermore, this paper discusses the advantages of resident participation in cognitive mapping over conventional social and environmental analysis for landscape planning on other conservation areas

    Facile Method to Prepare for the Ni2P Nanostructures with Controlled Crystallinity and Morphology as Anode Materials of Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Get PDF
    Conversion reaction materials (transition metal oxides, sulfides, phosphides, etc.) are attractive in the field of lithium-ion batteries because of their high theoretical capacity and low cost. However, the realization of these materials in lithium-ion batteries is impeded by large voltage hysteresis, high polarization, inferior cycle stability, rate capability, irreversible capacity loss in first cycling, and dramatic volume change during redox reactions. One method to overcome these problems is the introduction of amorphous materials. This work introduces a facile method to synthesize amorphous and crystalline dinickel phosphide (Ni2P) nanoparticle clusters with identical morphology and presents a direct comparison of the two materials as anode materials for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. To assess the effect of crystallinity and hierarchical structure of nanomaterials, it is crucial to conserve other factors including size, morphology, and ligand of nanoparticles. Although it is rarely studied about synthetic methods of well-controlled Ni2P nanomaterials to meet the above criteria, we synthesized amorphous, crystalline Ni2P, and self-assembled Ni2P nanoparticle clusters via thermal decomposition of nickel-surfactant complex. Interestingly, simple modulation of the quantity of nickel acetylacetonate produced amorphous, crystalline, and self-assembled Ni2P nanoparticles. A 0.357 M nickel-trioctylphosphine (TOP) solution leads to a reaction temperature limitation (similar to 315 degrees C) by the nickel precursor, and crystalline Ni2P (c-Ni2P) nanoparticles clusters are generated. On the contrary, a lower concentration (0.1 M) does not accompany a temperature limitation and hence high reaction temperature (330 degrees C) can be exploited for the self-assembly of Ni2P (s-Ni2P) nanoparticle clusters. Amorphous Ni2P (a-Ni2P) nanoparticle clusters are generated with a high concentration (0.714 M) of nickel-TOP solution and a temperature limitation (similar to 290 degrees C). The a-Ni2P nanoparticle cluster electrode exhibits higher capacities and Coulombic efficiency than the electrode based on c-Ni2P nanoparticle clusters. In addition, the amorphous structure of Ni2P can reduce irreversible capacity and voltage hysteresis upon cycling. The amorphous morphology of Ni2P also improves the rate capability, resulting in superior performance to those of c-Ni2P nanoparticle clusters in terms of electrode performance

    The Art of Representation: How Reputation Affects Success with Different Audiences in the Contemporary Art Field

    Get PDF
    We study the effects of actors audience-specific reputations on their levels of success with different audiences in the same field. Extending recent work that has emphasized the presence of multiple audiences with different concerns, we demonstrate that considering audience specificity leads to an improved understanding of reputation effects. Using data on emerging artists in the field of contemporary art from 2001 to 2010, we investigate the manner in which artists audience-specific reputations affect their subsequent success with two distinct audiences: museums and galleries. Our findings suggest that audience-specific reputations have systematically different effects with respect to success with museums and galleries. Our findings also illuminate the extent to which audience-specific reputations are relevant for emerging research on the contingent effects of reputation. In particular, our findings support our predictions that audiences differ from one another in terms of the extent to which other signals (specifically, status and interaction with other audiences) enhance or reduce the value of audience-specific reputations. Our study thus advances theory by providing empirical evidence for the value of incorporating audience-specific reputations into the general study of reputation.Funding Agencies|Oxford University Centre for Corporate Reputation; European Research Council under the European Union [324233]; Riksbankens Jubileumsfond [DNR M12-0301:1]</p

    The Art of Representation: How Reputation Affects Success with Different Audiences in the Contemporary Art Field

    Get PDF
    We study the effects of actors audience-specific reputations on their levels of success with different audiences in the same field. Extending recent work that has emphasized the presence of multiple audiences with different concerns, we demonstrate that considering audience specificity leads to an improved understanding of reputation effects. Using data on emerging artists in the field of contemporary art from 2001 to 2010, we investigate the manner in which artists audience-specific reputations affect their subsequent success with two distinct audiences: museums and galleries. Our findings suggest that audience-specific reputations have systematically different effects with respect to success with museums and galleries. Our findings also illuminate the extent to which audience-specific reputations are relevant for emerging research on the contingent effects of reputation. In particular, our findings support our predictions that audiences differ from one another in terms of the extent to which other signals (specifically, status and interaction with other audiences) enhance or reduce the value of audience-specific reputations. Our study thus advances theory by providing empirical evidence for the value of incorporating audience-specific reputations into the general study of reputation.Funding Agencies|Oxford University Centre for Corporate Reputation; European Research Council under the European Union [324233]; Riksbankens Jubileumsfond [DNR M12-0301:1]</p

    Epidemiology and survival factors for sarcoma patients in minority populations: a SEER-retrospective study

    Get PDF
    Background: Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated race as a predictor of worse oncological outcomes. To better understand the effect of race on oncological outcomes, we utilized the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database to determine what treatment courses are provided to minority patients and how this impacts survival. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of bone and soft tissue sarcoma cases was performed using the SEER database for a minimum 5-year survival rate using Kaplan-Meier curves. Categorical variables were compared using Pearson’s Chi-Square test and Cramer V. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to determine survival rates (SR) and Cox regression analysis was used to determine hazard ratios (HRs). Results: Races that had an increased risk of death included Native American/Alaska Native (NA/AN) [hazard ratio (HR): 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.049–1.761, p = 0.020) and Black (HR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.091–1.256, p &lt; 0.001). NA/AN individuals had the lowest SR (5-year SR = 70.9%, 95% CI: 63.8–78.0%, p &lt; 0.001). The rate of metastasis at diagnosis for each race was 13.07% — Hispanic, 10.62% — NA/AN, 12.77% — Black, 10.61% — Asian/Pacific Islander (A/PI), and 9.02% — White individuals (p &lt; 0.001). There were increases in the rate of metastasis at diagnosis and decreases in rates of surgical excision for Hispanic and Black patients (p &lt; 0.001). Conclusion: Race is determined to be an independent risk factor for death in NA/AN and Black patients with sarcomas of the extremities. Access to healthcare and delay in seeking treatment may contribute to higher rates of metastasis upon diagnosis for minority patients, and decreased rates of surgical excision could be associated with poor follow up and lack of resources
    corecore