1,644 research outputs found

    "I Saw You": searching for lost love via practices of reading, writing and responding

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    How do emotions move and how do emotions move us? How are feelings and recognitions distributed socio-materially? Based on a multi-site ethnographic study of a romantic correspondance system, this article explores the themes of love, privacy, identity and public displays. Informed by ethnomethodology and actor-network theory its investigations into these informal affairs are somewhat unusual in that much of the research carried out by those bodies of work concentrates on institutional settings such as laboratories, offices and courtrooms. In common with ethnomethodology it attempts to re-specify some topics of interest in the social sciences and humanities; in this case, documents and practices of writing and reading those documents. A key element of the approach taken is restoring to reading and writing their situated nature as observable, knowable, distributed community practices. Re-specifying topics for the social sciences involves the detailed description of several situated ways in which the romantic correspondence system is used. Detailing the translations, transformations and transportations of documents as 'quasi-objects' through several orderings, the article suggests that documents have no essential meaning and that making them meaningful is part of the work of those settings

    An ethnography of a neighbourhood café: informality, table arrangements and background noise

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    CafĂ© society is something that many of us as customers and/or social theorists take for granted. CafĂ©s are places where we are not simply served hot beverages but are also in some way partaking of a specific form of public life. It is this latter aspect that has attracted the attention of social theorists, especially JĂŒrgen Habermas, and leads them to locate the cafĂ© as a key place in the development of modernity. Our approach to cafĂ©s is to ‘turn the tables’ on theories of the public sphere and return to just what the life of a particular cafĂ© consists of, and in so doing re-specify a selection of topics related to public spaces. The particular topics we deal with in a ‘worldly manner’ are the socio-material organisation of space, informality and rule following. In as much as we are able we have drawn on an ethnomethodological way of doing and analysing our ethnographic studies

    ’Eyes free’ in-car assistance: parent and child passenger collaboration during phone calls

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    This paper examines routine family car journeys, looking specifically at how passengers assist during a mobile telephone call while the drivers address the competing demands of handling the vehicle, interacting with various artefacts and controls in the cabin, and engage in co-located and remote conversations while navigating through busy city roads. Based on an analysis of video fragments, we see how drivers and child passengers form their conversations and requests around the call so as to be meaningful and paced to the demands, knowledge and abilities of their cooccupants, and how the conditions of the road and emergent traffic are oriented to and negotiated in the context of the social interaction that they exist alongside. The study provides implications for the design of car-based collaborative media and considers how hands- and eyesfree natural interfaces could be tailored to the complexity of activities in the car and on the road

    The Haggle-O-Tron:design intervention in secondhand retail

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    Artificial infestations of Tapinanthus ogowensis (Engler) Danser (Loranthaceae) on three host species in the Logbessou Plateau (Douala, Cameroon)

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    In Cameroon today, Loranthaceae has become a major pest against which a great “battle” must be launched if food production in the country has to be maintained at a self-sufficient level. However, aneffective battle against pests can only be achieved through a better understanding of their geographical distribution and biology. Eight Loranthaceae species (Globimetula braunii, Globimetula dinklagei,Globimetula opaca, Helixanthera mannii, Phragmanthera capitata, Tapinanthus globiferus, Tapinanthus ogowensis, and Tapinanthus preussii) have been identified in the Douala area. Among these species, T. ogowensis is the only one limited to a surface area of about eight hectares in the Logbessou plateau located in a direction of North-East from Douala (Latitude 03°40 - 04°11' N, Longitude 09°16' - 09°52' E,and at an altitude of 13 m). In this zone, the hemi-parasite infests only one host tree (Dacryodes edulis) in the orchards, gardens and agricultural plantations. The hemiparasite is however common andadapted to all the different ecological regions in the southern part Cameroon where it infests several host trees. In order to study the stages involved in the germination, fixation, as well as the initial stagesinvolved in the development of the seedlings of T. ogowensis, three of the most frequent host species (D. edulis, Mangifera indica and Persea americana) on the plateau were artificially infected. The resultsrevealed that the host species are sensitive to the parasite, T. ogowensis, at least during their early stages of growth and development. D. edulis is the most sensitive host species with a 22% yield ofyoung seedlings as against 5 and 4% for P. americana and M. indica, respectively. This sensitivity of the mango tree to T. ogowensis had never been demonstrated before. The percentages of seedsgerminating on the different host species however remained high; 96% on both D. edulis and M. indica and 93% on P. americana. It was also revealed that the development of the young seedlings of T.ogowensis is greatly influenced by the availability of light, a plausible reason why Loranthaceae occupies mainly the uppermost branches of the oldest trees found here

    Crossing with care: bogs, streams and assistive mobilities as family praxis in the countryside

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    In this paper, we use ethnomethodology, membership categorisation analysis, and conversation analysis (EMCA) to investigate traversing obstacles in outdoor environments as reflexively constitutive of producing, resisting and adjusting family relationships. We look at how relationship categories are a resource to be drawn upon in organising intercorporeal mobile actions. When faced with obstacles, group members offer, recruit, request or reject assistance, through altered bodily movements, in relation to obstacles. The assistance offered is constituted through, literally, lending a hand in finely coordinated and adjusted forms of contact and support. We locate the significance of assisting practices that are made relevant by these relationships (e.g. adult-child) and how such practices are intertwined with perceiving the local environment (e.g. rivers, the terrain underfoot). The data are video recordings of families walking through the countryside and assisting one another in crossing obstacles. Our findings on the organisation and accountability of traversing, through touch, gesture and talk, contribute to studies of family practices, mobility, and inter-corporeality

    Joining the conspiracy? Negotiating ethics and emotions in researching (around) AIDS in southern Africa

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    AIDS is an emotive subject, particularly in southern Africa. Among those who have been directly affected by the disease, or who perceive themselves to be personally at risk, talking about AIDS inevitably arouses strong emotions - amongst them fear, distress, loss and anger. Conventionally, human geography research has avoided engagement with such emotions. Although the ideal of the detached observer has been roundly critiqued, the emphasis in methodological literature on 'doing no harm' has led even qualitative researchers to avoid difficult emotional encounters. Nonetheless, research is inevitably shaped by emotions, not least those of the researchers themselves. In this paper, we examine the role of emotions in the research process through our experiences of researching the lives of 'Young AIDS migrants' in Malawi and Lesotho. We explore how the context of the research gave rise to the production of particular emotions, and how, in response, we shaped the research, presenting a research agenda focused more on migration than AIDS. This example reveals a tension between universalised ethics expressed through ethical research guidelines that demand informed consent, and ethics of care, sensitive to emotional context. It also demonstrates how dualistic distinctions between reason and emotion, justice and care, global and local are unhelpful in interpreting the ethics of research practice

    How breakfast happens in the café

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    In this article I present an ethnographic study of `breakfast in the café', to begin to document the orderly properties of an emergent timespace. In so doing, the aim is to provide a description of the local production of timespace and a consideration of a change to the daily rhythm of city life. Harold Garfinkel and David Sudnow's study of a chemistry lecture is drawn upon as an exemplary study of the collective creation of an event. Attention is drawn to the centrality of sequentiality as part of the orderly properties of occasioned places. As part of examining the sequences I chart the ongoing emergence of features of breakfast time in the café such as `the first customer', `crowded' and `quiet'. In closing the article, I consider how changes in the rhythm of the city are made apprehensible to its residents

    Measurement of the cross-section and charge asymmetry of WW bosons produced in proton-proton collisions at s=8\sqrt{s}=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

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    This paper presents measurements of the W+→Ό+ÎœW^+ \rightarrow \mu^+\nu and W−→Ό−ΜW^- \rightarrow \mu^-\nu cross-sections and the associated charge asymmetry as a function of the absolute pseudorapidity of the decay muon. The data were collected in proton--proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC and correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 20.2~\mbox{fb^{-1}}. The precision of the cross-section measurements varies between 0.8% to 1.5% as a function of the pseudorapidity, excluding the 1.9% uncertainty on the integrated luminosity. The charge asymmetry is measured with an uncertainty between 0.002 and 0.003. The results are compared with predictions based on next-to-next-to-leading-order calculations with various parton distribution functions and have the sensitivity to discriminate between them.Comment: 38 pages in total, author list starting page 22, 5 figures, 4 tables, submitted to EPJC. All figures including auxiliary figures are available at https://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/PHYSICS/PAPERS/STDM-2017-13
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