1,436 research outputs found

    Decoder Assisted Channel Estimation and Frame Synchronization

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    Electrically driven spin resonance in a bent disordered carbon nanotube

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    Resonant manipulation of carbon nanotube valley-spin qubits by an electric field is investigated theoretically. We develop a new analysis of electrically driven spin resonance exploiting fixed physical characteristics of the nanotube: a bend and inhomogeneous disorder. The spectrum is simulated for an electron valley-spin qubit coupled to a hole valley-spin qubit and an impurity electron spin, and features that coincide with a recent measurement are identified. We show that the same mechanism allows resonant control of the full four-dimensional spin-valley space.Comment: 11 pages, 7 figure

    Magnetic Properties of Endohedral Fullerenes:Applications and Perspectives

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    Underwater Photography of Fish Found on the Coral Reefs of Jamaica

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    Techniques are described for photographing fish under water at the Caribbean Biological Center near Ocha Rios, Jamaica. F-numbers 5.6 and 8 with shutter speed of 1/125 at a distance of 3 feet yielded the best photographs

    Characterization of Antibiotic Resistance Profiles of Surface Water Bacteria in an Urbanizing Watershed

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    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) are typically incapable of addressing the influx of antibiotics (AB), and may act as a harbor for the selection and proliferation of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB). In order to examine the influence of WWTP discharge on the AB resistance profiles of surface water bacteria in an urban stream setting, E. coli isolates and total heterotrophic bacteria populations were cultivated from 6 sampling sites up and downstream of WWTPs, and evaluated for resistance to selected ABs. Samples were collected over a 9-month period in the Carter’s Creek watershed of College Station, TX. E. coli isolates were tested for resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, cephalothin, cefoperazone, gentamycin, and imipenem using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. HPCs were cultivated on R2A amended with ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and sulfamethoxazole. Significant associations (p < 0.05) were observed between the locations of sampling sites relative to WWTP discharge points and the rate of E. coli isolate resistance to tetracycline, ampicillin, cefoperazone, ciprofloxacin, and sulfamethoxazole; and an increased rate of isolate multi-drug resistance. The abundance of AB-resistant HPCs was significantly greater (p < 0.05) downstream of WWTPs for all treatments; however, there was no spatially significant difference when normalized to total HPCs cultivated with no AB. Results suggest that the effects of human development, specifically the discharge of treated WWTP effluent into surface waters, are potentially significant contributors to the spread and persistence of AB resistance in the surrounding watershed

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    We introduce the `displacemon' electromechanical architecture that comprises a vibrating nanobeam, e.g. a carbon nanotube, flux coupled to a superconducting qubit. This platform can achieve strong and even ultrastrong coupling enabling a variety of quantum protocols. We use this system to describe a protocol for generating and measuring quantum interference between two trajectories of a nanomechanical resonator. The scheme uses a sequence of qubit manipulations and measurements to cool the resonator, apply an effective diffraction grating, and measure the resulting interference pattern. We simulate the protocol for a realistic system consisting of a vibrating carbon nanotube acting as a junction in a superconducting qubit, and we demonstrate the feasibility of generating a spatially distinct quantum superposition state of motion containing more than 10610^6 nucleons.Comment: 12 pages, 7 figure

    Keeping perfect time with caged atoms

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    For Fridtjof Nansen, 13 April 1895 started well. Six days earlier, the Norwegian explorer had set a new record for the closest approach to the North Pole, and now he was moving quickly over unbroken sea ice toward Cape Fligely and home. But then came a sickening realization: In his eagerness to break camp, he had forgotten to wind the chronometers. He had lost track of precise time, and thus the ability to track his longitude. Although Nansen couldn't have lost his position by more than a few minutes, it forced him to take a circuitously conservative route to avoid being swept into the North Atlantic. His expedition thus had to endure a hungry winter, camped on an unknown shore. Not until June the following year did he encounter other explorers and learn his true position-on Cape Felder, in Franz Josef Land

    Increased Antimicrobial and Multidrug Resistance Downstream of Wastewater Treatment Plants in an Urban Watershed

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    Development and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and multidrug resistance (MDR) through propagation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in various environments is a global emerging public health concern. The role of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) as hot spots for the dissemination of AMR and MDR has been widely pointed out by the scientific community. In this study, we collected surface water samples from sites upstream and downstream of two WWTP discharge points in an urban watershed in the Bryan-College Station (BCS), Texas area, over a period of nine months. E. coli isolates were tested for resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, cephalothin, cefoperazone, gentamycin, and imipenem using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Antimicrobial resistant heterotrophic bacteria were cultured on R2A media amended with ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and sulfamethoxazole for analyzing heterotrophic bacteria capable of growth on antibiotic-containing media. In addition, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method was used to measure eight ARG – tetA, tetW, aacA, ampC, mecA, ermA, blaTEM, and intI1 in the surface water collected at each time point. Significant associations (p \u3c 0.05) were observed between the locations of sampling sites relative to WWTP discharge points and the rate of E. coli isolate resistance to tetracycline, ampicillin, cefoperazone, ciprofloxacin, and sulfamethoxazole together with an increased rate of isolate MDR. The abundance of antibiotic-resistant heterotrophs was significantly greater (p \u3c 0.05) downstream of WWTPs compared to upstream locations for all tested antibiotics. Consistent with the results from the culture-based methods, the concentrations of all ARG were substantially higher in the downstream sites compared to the upstream sites, particularly in the site immediately downstream of the WWTP effluent discharges (except mecA). In addition, the Class I integron (intI1) genes were detected in high amounts at all sites and all sampling points, and were about ∼20 times higher in the downstream sites (2.5 × 107 copies/100 mL surface water) compared to the upstream sites (1.2 × 106 copies/100 mL surface water). Results suggest that the treated WWTP effluent discharges into surface waters can potentially contribute to the occurrence and prevalence of AMR in urban watersheds. In addition to detecting increased ARG in the downstream sites by qPCR, findings from this study also report an increase in viable AMR (HPC) and MDR (E. coli) in these sites. This data will benefit establishment of improved environmental regulations and practices to help manage AMR/MDR and ARG discharges into the environment, and to develop mitigation strategies and effective treatment of wastewater
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