58 research outputs found

    Genotypes

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    Genotype data in Genalex format (http://biology-assets.anu.edu.au/GenAlEx/Welcome.html)

    Trap_level_trapping_data

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    Capture data at trap level for binomial modelling of capture pattern

    Lindenmayer salvage logging birds

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    Data from an 8-year study of bird responses across a spectrum of disturbance types in Australian Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans) forests following wildfires in 2009. We extracted data for 88 plots from three studies within the Victorian Tall Eucalypt Forest Plot Network. The plots had varying degrees of disturbance in terms of fire and logging. We established three survey points in each plot and recorded bird species present at each survey point over the period 2009 to 2016 on one or more occasions

    Demographic trends.

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    <p>The number of mountain brushtail possums captured at the Cambarville study site before and after the February 2009 Black Saturday wildfires. The timing of the15 trapping sessions over this period are indicated with a “+” sign.</p

    Data indicating tree collapse over an 18 year period

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    Data for 737 trees showing their form in 1997 and again in 2015, along with landscape level covariates. Euclidean Nearest Neighbour Distance, and Interspersion & Juxtaposition Index metrics are derived from FragStats

    Stages of hollow formation, death and decay of mountain ash trees (<i>Eucalyptus regnans</i>).

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    <p>The trees surveyed in this study were characterised according to five tree form (TF) categories pictured from left to right: TF1: live trees with no visible hollows (typically young trees); TF2: live trees with visible hollows (typically older, senescing trees); TF3: dead trees in the early stages of decay; TF4; dead trees in the mid-stages of decay; and TF5: highly decayed dead trees. Live trees do not begin to form hollows suitable for arboreal marsupials until they reach an age of at least 120 years.</p

    Pre and post-fire shifts in the tree forms used as shelter by mountain brushtail possums.

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    <p>These graphs show the predicted probabilities (and 95% confidence intervals) of an occupied tree being of a form greater than Tree Form 2 (<a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0022952#pone-0022952-g006" target="_blank">Figure 6a</a>), greater than Tree Form 3 (<a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0022952#pone-0022952-g006" target="_blank">Figure 6b</a>) or greater than Tree Form 4 (<a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0022952#pone-0022952-g006" target="_blank">Figure 6c</a>) before and after the fire unburnt and unburnt habitat. See <a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0022952#pone-0022952-g001" target="_blank">Figure 1</a> for details of Tree Form (TF) categories. These predictions were from generalised linear mixed models of the types of trees used by individuals radiotracked before and after the fires. See <a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0022952#pone-0022952-t001" target="_blank">Table 1</a> for fitted model statistics.</p
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