6 research outputs found

    Basho & Friends Literacy Game for Tablet

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    Basho & Friends is an in-progress prototype for an interactive children’s book. Here, children ages 8-13 collaborate with young Basho, the legendary founder of haiku poetry, to become poets themselves. This project exemplifies a “convivial tool,” defined by philosopher Ivan Illich as a platform designed to promote creative expression. Here, we imagine new possibilities for reading, sensemaking, and creative writing based on past forms and ideas. Through poetry, Basho promotes meaningful principles of literacy and sustainability today. Children can engage with Basho’s story in an historical context and practice haiku to see themselves as authors of their life stories

    Graphicacy: How Fluency in Reading and Making Visualizations Can Yield More Inclusive Reading Experiences

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    Scholars and students practice literacy, numeracy, and graphicacy in school. In this educational triumvirate, graphicacy remains the less familiar term. Graphicacy is an ability, a fluency in making and reading visualizations and charts. How might scholars working in digital media practice graphic literacy in the shaping and sharing of their work? By working with more awareness of graphic literacy, scholars can also become more inclusive. In this illustrated essay, I will describe how my work in visualizing survey data provides insight into graphic literacy. Survey data is a primary data source. These observations have the potential for meaning yet need a meaningful structure and shape. While structuring, exploring, and visualizing this survey data, diverse world views begin to emerge. Digital scholars can also identify when to draw upon data-driven or conceptual content. By creating interactive survey data visualizations, we can partake in more inclusive humanistic inquiries and reading experiences

    Successful orthotopic liver transplantation in an adult patient with sickle cell disease and review of the literature

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    Sickle cell disease can lead to hepatic complications ranging from acute hepatic crises to chronic liver disease including intrahepatic cholestasis, and iron overload. Although uncommon, intrahepatic cholestasis may be severe and medical treatment of this complication is often ineffective. We report a case of a 37 year-old male patient with sickle cell anemia, who developed liver failure and underwent successful orthotopic liver transplantation. Both pre and post-operatively, he was maintained on red cell transfusions. He remains stable with improved liver function 42 months post transplant. The role for orthotopic liver transplantation is not well defined in patients with sickle cell disease, and the experience remains limited. Although considerable challenges of post-transplant graft complications remain, orthotopic liver transplantation should be considered as a treatment option for sickle cell disease patients with end-stage liver disease who have progressed despite conventional medical therapy. An extended period of red cell transfusion support may lessen the post-operative complications

    Message Journal, Issue 5: COVID-19 SPECIAL ISSUE Capturing visual insights, thoughts and reflections on 2020/21 and beyond...

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    If there is a theme running through the Message Covid-19 special issue, it is one of caring. Of our own and others’ resilience and wellbeing, of friendship and community, of students, practitioners and their futures, of social justice, equality and of doing the right thing. The veins of designing with care run through the edition, wide and deep. It captures, not designers as heroes, but those with humble views, exposing the need to understand a diversity of perspectives when trying to comprehend the complexity that Covid-19 continues to generate. As graphic designers, illustrators and visual communicators, contributors have created, documented, written, visualised, reflected, shared, connected and co-created, designed for good causes and re-defined what it is to be a student, an academic and a designer during the pandemic. This poignant period in time has driven us, through isolation, towards new rules of living, and new ways of working; to see and map the world in a different light. A light that is uncertain, disjointed, and constantly being redefined. This Message issue captures responses from the graphic communication design community in their raw state, to allow contributors to communicate their experiences through both their written and visual voice. Thus, the reader can discern as much from the words as the design and visualisations. Through this issue a substantial number of contributions have focused on personal reflection, isolation, fear, anxiety and wellbeing, as well as reaching out to community, making connections and collaborating. This was not surprising in a world in which connection with others has often been remote, and where ‘normal’ social structures of support and care have been broken down. We also gain insight into those who are using graphic communication design to inspire and capture new ways of teaching and learning, developing themselves as designers, educators, and activists, responding to social justice and to do good; gaining greater insight into society, government actions and conspiracy. Introduction: Victoria Squire - Coping with Covid: Community, connection and collaboration: James Alexander & Carole Evans, Meg Davies, Matthew Frame, Chae Ho Lee, Alma Hoffmann, Holly K. Kaufman-Hill, Joshua Korenblat, Warren Lehrer, Christine Lhowe, Sara Nesteruk, Cat Normoyle & Jessica Teague, Kyuha Shim. - Coping with Covid: Isolation, wellbeing and hope: Sadia Abdisalam, Tom Ayling, Jessica Barness, Megan Culliford, Stephanie Cunningham, Sofija Gvozdeva, Hedzlynn Kamaruzzaman, Merle Karp, Erica V. P. Lewis, Kelly Salchow Macarthur, Steven McCarthy, Shelly Mayers, Elizabeth Shefrin, Angelica Sibrian, David Smart, Ane Thon Knutsen, Isobel Thomas, Darryl Westley. - Coping with Covid: Pedagogy, teaching and learning: Bernard J Canniffe, Subir Dey, Aaron Ganci, Elizabeth Herrmann, John Kilburn, Paul Nini, Emily Osborne, Gianni Sinni & Irene Sgarro, Dave Wood, Helena Gregory, Colin Raeburn & Jackie Malcolm. - Coping with Covid: Social justice, activism and doing good: Class Action Collective, Xinyi Li, Matt Soar, Junie Tang, Lisa Winstanley. - Coping with Covid: Society, control and conspiracy: Diana Bîrhală, Maria Borțoi, Patti Capaldi, Tânia A. Cardoso, Peter Gibbons, Bianca Milea, Rebecca Tegtmeyer, Danne Wo

    Successful Orthotopic Liver Transplantation in an Adult Patient with Sickle Cell Disease and Review of the Literature

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    Sickle cell disease can lead to hepatic complications ranging from acute hepatic crises to chronic liver disease including intrahepatic cholestasis, and iron overload. Although uncommon, intrahepatic cholestasis may be severe and medical treatment of this complication is often ineffective. We report a case of a 37 year-old male patient with sickle cell anemia, who developed liver failure and underwent successful orthotopic liver transplantation. Both pre and post-operatively, he was maintained on red cell transfusions. He remains stable with improved liver function 42 months post transplant. The role for orthotopic liver transplantation is not well defined in patients with sickle cell disease, and the experience remains limited. Although considerable challenges of post-transplant graft complications remain, orthotopic liver transplantation should be considered as a treatment option for sickle cell disease patients with end-stage liver disease who have progressed despite conventional medical therapy. An extended period of red cell transfusion support may lessen the post-operative complications

    Clinical outcomes of patients with unresectable primary liver cancer treated with MR-guided stereotactic body radiation Therapy: A Six-Year experience

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    Purpose: Magnetic resonance-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (MRgSBRT) with optional online adaptation has shown promise in delivering ablative doses to unresectable primary liver cancer. However, there remain limited data on the indications for online adaptation as well as dosimetric and longer-term clinical outcomes following MRgSBRT Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), and combined biphenotypic hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma (cHCC-CCA) who completed MRgSBRT to 50 Gy in 5 fractions between June of 2015 and December of 2021 were analyzed. The necessity of adaptive techniques was evaluated. The cumulative incidence of local progression was evaluated and survival and competing risk analyses were performed. Results: Ninety-nine analyzable patients completed MRgSBRT during the study period and 54 % had planning target volumes (PTVs) within 1 cm of the duodenum, small bowel, or stomach at the time of simulation. Online adaptive RT was used in 53 % of patients to correct organ-at-risk constraint violation and/or to improve target coverage. In patients who underwent adaptive RT planning, online replanning resulted in superior target coverage when compared to projected, non-adaptive plans (median coverage ≥ 95 % at 47.5 Gy: 91 % [IQR: 82–96] before adaptation vs 95 % [IQR: 87–99] after adaptation, p < 0.01). The median follow-up for surviving patients was 34.2 months for patients with HCC and 10.1 months for patients with CCA/cHCC-CCA. For all patients, the 2-year cumulative incidence of local progression was 9.8 % (95 % CI: 1.5–18 %) for patients with HCC and 9.0 % (95 % CI: 0.1–18) for patients with CCA/cHCC-CCA. Grade 3 through 5 acute and late clinical gastrointestinal toxicities were observed in < 10 % of the patients. Conclusions: MRgSBRT, with the option for online adaptive planning when merited, allows delivery of ablative doses to primary liver tumors with excellent local control with acceptable toxicities. Additional studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of MRgSBRT in the treatment of primary liver cancer are warranted
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