10 research outputs found

    The Role of Museums’ Social Media for Supporting Socially Engaged Museum Practices (MAXQDA)

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    The dataset encompasses diverse forms of mainly qualitative data including interview transcriptions, ethnographic observations, institutional documents, meeting minutes/meeting notes and social media posts from four key museum case studies that are organised into five folders. This dataset encompasses a variety of documents including Docx, PDF, and Excel files. The dataset underpins the thesis titled ‘Crafting Museum Social Media for Social Inclusion Work’ which was part of the European Union ECR Training Network – POEM on participatory memory practices in digital ecologies funded by the Horizon 2020 Marie SkƂodowska-Curie grant, agreement No. 764859. The Dataset was used to understand the main research question of the thesis: 1) How can social media support the museum’s socially inclusive role to potentially challenge social exclusion and associated inequalities? This was underpinned by two additional questions: 2) How do structures (institutional and social platforms) shape how staff carry out social inclusion work through social media? 3) Which work processes enable staff to pursue social inclusion through social media

    Surfacing the National Collections: adapting image cataloguing standards to transform access to National Museums Scotland's online collections (dataset)

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    The dataset was produced as part of a project with National Museums Scotland (February - June 2023) to improve their online collections findability and searchability through a user-centred approach. Publicly available data: Includes aggregated and anonymised data from the user/non-user interviews, surveys, and user queries, which were collected to understand how participants do and desire to explore the National Museums Scotland’s online collections. This includes a report containing aggregated results from two online surveys ‘Survey Data Report Summary’ (PDF), a folder of images from interviews (from the card sort and concept mapping activities), titled ‘Card-sort and Concept Map Images’ (36 JPEG/PNG), and a series of tables summarising findings from a sample of user search queries from the Museums’ Search our Collections Portal (from 2020-2021) titled ‘GKEF SoC Aggregated Data’ (PDF). Participants are referred to in these documents by pseudonyms. Not available publicly: A folder of ‘Transcriptions of Interviews from Users/Non-users’ (10 Docx files) and a folder containing ‘Transcriptions of Interviews with National Museums Scotland’s Staff’ (13 Docx files). Participants are referred to by a number

    Repairing online spaces for "safe" outreach with older adults

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    Despite the widely recognized importance in the museum sector of cultivating safe, welcoming spaces for projects that work towards social change, few studies consider how feelings of safety can be cultivated online. To provide insight for future museum practices, this study focuses on a series of collaborative sessions facilitated by a museum outreach institution and a social enterprise to provide online engagement activities for older adults during COVID-19. Employing a social media ethnography, this study reveals how staff can create feelings of safety online through repair processes that work around, with, and against the unethical and contradictory bounds of online infrastructures

    Museum Social Media Practices: In Need of Repair?

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    Within the museum sector, research and associated theories on technology can often lead to rhetoric on progression that results in the idealization of the new or the emergent. However, if we approach technologies with a sensitivity towards their fragility, we see it is not always progression that is most interesting, but processes of repair. Social media, it can be argued, is an outdated technology which has lost its excitement and like the larger ideals associated with digital in the cultural heritage sector, is perceived with skepticism. Yet, with the rise of the museum’s social role, museums have an ethical responsibility to understand the factors that shape how social media practices are enacted. In this paper I take on perspective of repair to explore the intersection between social media and organizational structures through an in-depth ethnographic case study of Glasgow Museums Services (Glasgow, UK). The analysis provides essential insights into the (dis)-connections between museum social media practices and museum infrastructure. It suggests that the desire for more participatory social media practices overlooks the underpinning and incompatible elements of the museum institution

    Museums, Challenging Heritage and Social Media During COVID-19

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    In this opinion piece I reflect upon museum social media trends during COVID-19 and consider what it could mean in terms of future online engagement and the (mis)alignment of practices with institutional social missions. In opposition to the recent focus on uplifting museum content and activities online, I investigate an overlooked question regarding the role of challenging heritage on social media during the pandemic. I end with a call for the sector to consider the complexities of including or excluding challenging heritage from current museum online activities and in turn, the opening or foreclosure of critical reflections at a pivotal time in history

    Crafting museum social media for social inclusion work

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    Platforms as bridging digitally enabled participation with exhibitions

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    Breaking boundaries, creating connectivities: enabling access to digitized museum collections

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    Museum staff as gatekeepers to cultural heritage are central to enabling or constraining user interaction with museum objects. However, organizational barriers frequently hinder staff's ability to invest in expanding user access to digitized collections. In this chapter, we analyze staff practices that help create online opportunities for user engagement, which we argue is a process of actively expanding and negotiating infrastructural boundaries of connective capacities. These boundaries constitute and expose an “installed base”, which refers to the backbone of infrastructure, and the existing practices and norms from which work takes place. Drawing on two case studies, our analysis suggests that changes to the infrastructure, including the expansion of digitized collections and tools, builds on and is shaped by the installed base. By centering user needs and leveraging their place in diverse heritage networks, staff are able to overcome infrastructural boundaries that shape and hinder practices of designing for access. This study illustrates, in particular, the ways in which staff are compelled to negotiate perceptions of what constitutes both an “authentic” museum object and a professional museum role in order to enable user access to digitized collections

    Book review essay: Care-ful Participation in Museums: a review of The Museum as a Space of Social Care by Nuala Morse

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    Care-ful Participation in Museums: A Review of The Museum as a Space of Social Care by Nuala Morse
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