37,611 research outputs found

    Performance of the distributed central analysis in BaBar

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    The total dataset produced by the BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) currently comprises roughly3times1093times 10^9data events and an equal amount of simulated events, corresponding to 23 Tbytes of real data and 51 Tbytes simulated events. Since individual analyses typically select a very small fraction of all events, it would be extremely inefficient if each analysis had to process the full dataset. A first, centrally managed analysis step is therefore a common pre-selection (‘skimming’) of all data according to very loose, inclusive criteria to facilitate data access for later analysis. Usually, there are common selection criteria for several analysis. However, they may change over time, e.g., when new analyses are developed. Currently,$cal

    A High Phase Advance Damped and Detuned Structure for the Main Linacs of Clic

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    The main accelerating structures for the CLIC are designed to operate at an average accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m. The accelerating frequency has been optimised to 11.994 GHz with a phase advance of 2{\pi}/3 of the main accelerating mode. The moderately damped and detuned structure (DDS) design is being studied as an alternative to the strongly damped WDS design. Both these designs are based on the nominal accelerating phase advance. Here we explore high phase advance (HPA) structures in which the group velocity of the rf fields is reduced compared to that of standard (2{\pi}/3) structures. The electrical breakdown strongly depends on the fundamental mode group velocity. Hence it is expected that electrical breakdown is less likely to occur in the HPA structures. We report on a study of both the fundamental and dipole modes in a CLIC_DDS_HPA structure, designed to operate at 5{\pi}/6 phase advance per cell. Higher order dipole modes in both the standard and HPA structures are also studied

    A survey of factors influencing career preference in new-entrant and exiting medical students from four UK medical schools

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    Our thanks to Professor Gillian Needham and Dr Murray Lough for their encouragement and support, and their comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript. Our thanks also to NHS Education for Scotland [NES] for funding, and the Scottish Medical Deans Education Group [SMDEG] for supporting this project. We are grateful to all the students who gave their time to complete the survey questionnaire and to those who helped organise and carry out data collection.Peer reviewedPublisher PD

    Enhanced coupling design of a detuned damped structure for clic

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    The key feature of the improved coupling design in the Damped Detuned Structure (DDS) is focused on the four manifolds. Rectangular geometry slots and rectangular manifolds are used. This results in a significantly stronger coupling to the manifolds compared to the previous design. We describe the new design together with its wakefield damping properties.Comment: 3 pages, 8 figures, submitted to IPAC1

    Climate change impacts on water for irrigated horticulture in the Vale of Evesham. Final Report

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    This project has undertaken a scoping review and assessment of the impacts of climate change on irrigated horticulture in the Vale of Evesham, an area of intense irrigated production located within the Environment Agency’s Warwickshire Avon CAMS Catchment. The research was based on a combination of methodologies including desk-based review of published and grey literature, computer agroclimatic and water balance modelling, GIS mapping, meetings with key informants and a stakeholder workshop. Future climate datasets were derived from the latest UK Climate Impacts Programme (UKICIP02) climatology, using selected emission scenarios for the 2020s, 2050s and 2080s. These scenarios were then used to model and map the future agroclimatic conditions under which agriculture might operate and the consequent impacts on irrigation need (depths of water applied) and volumetric demand. This was complimented by a postal survey to abstractors and a stakeholder workshop, to identify, review and assess farmer adaptation options and responses. The key findings arising from the research, implications for water resource management and recommendations for further work are summarised below. Using a geographical information system (GIS), a series of agroclimate maps have been produced, for the baseline and selected UKCIP02 scenario. The maps show major changes in agroclimate within the catchment over the next 50 years. The driest agroclimate zones are currently located around Worcester, Evesham, Tewkesbury and Gloucester, corresponding to areas where horticultural production and irrigation demand are most concentrated. By the 2020s, all agroclimate zones are predicted to increase in aridity. By the 2050s the entire catchment is predicted to have a drier agroclimate than is currently experienced anywhere in the driest parts of the catchment. This will have major impacts on the pattern of land use and irrigation water demand. Cont/d

    Pattern of malignant tumors observed in a university hospital: a retrospective analysis

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    A retrospective analysis of all malignant tumors observed in adults over a four-years period is presented. From January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1992, 2623 patients were coded by the Indexing and Coding Unit of Medical Records, The Aga Khan University Hospital to have cancer. Data presented reflect the relative frequency of different cancers seen at a single institution. Lung cancer was the commonest tumor observed in males. It was closely followed by head and neck cancer and lymphoma. In females, breast was the commonest cancer followed by ovarian and gallbladder. In comparison to the Western figures, an increased frequency of lymphomas and head and neck cancers was observed in males. Prostatic and colorectal cancers were less frequently observed. In females, gallbladder cancer is strikingly more frequent. Cervical cancer was less commonly observed as compared to the other developing countries and uterine cancer was infrequent in comparison to the Western countries. These data carry important implications for future health planning

    A generalized bayesian inference method for constraining the interiors of super Earths and sub-Neptunes

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    We aim to present a generalized Bayesian inference method for constraining interiors of super Earths and sub-Neptunes. Our methodology succeeds in quantifying the degeneracy and correlation of structural parameters for high dimensional parameter spaces. Specifically, we identify what constraints can be placed on composition and thickness of core, mantle, ice, ocean, and atmospheric layers given observations of mass, radius, and bulk refractory abundance constraints (Fe, Mg, Si) from observations of the host star's photospheric composition. We employed a full probabilistic Bayesian inference analysis that formally accounts for observational and model uncertainties. Using a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique, we computed joint and marginal posterior probability distributions for all structural parameters of interest. We included state-of-the-art structural models based on self-consistent thermodynamics of core, mantle, high-pressure ice, and liquid water. Furthermore, we tested and compared two different atmospheric models that are tailored for modeling thick and thin atmospheres, respectively. First, we validate our method against Neptune. Second, we apply it to synthetic exoplanets of fixed mass and determine the effect on interior structure and composition when (1) radius, (2) atmospheric model, (3) data uncertainties, (4) semi-major axes, (5) atmospheric composition (i.e., a priori assumption of enriched envelopes versus pure H/He envelopes), and (6) prior distributions are varied. Our main conclusions are: [...]Comment: Astronomy & Astrophysics, 597, A37, 17 pages, 11 figure
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