134 research outputs found

    \u27Workshops in healing\u27 for senior medical students: 5 year overview and appraisal

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    We report upon the design, content and feedback from an interactive, experiential series of Workshops in Healing for senior medical students. Fifty-six final year medical students enrolled in 2×3 h workshops designed around the core themes of ‘physician know thyself’ (Workshop 1) and ‘confronting suffering’ (Workshop 2). Of the 56 students who initially enrolled, 48 students completed both workshops and provided a written openended reflection of their learning experience. The study, undertaken over a consecutive 5-year period (2008–2012), employed an emergent, qualitative design using thematic analysis of the reflective comments. We found that the design and content of both workshops promoted transformative learning for these final year medical students. Students identified the following benefits: (1) the opportunity to reaffirm their commitment to their chosen career path; (2) the value of listening to other students share their stories; (3) the importance of the timing of the workshops to occur after exams; (4) the use of various mediums such as art, poetry, music and contemporary/classic literature to present concepts of suffering and healing; and (5) the creation of a safe and confidential space. Students reported that these innovative workshops gave them a renewed sense of drive and enthusiasm for their chosen career. They highlighted the importance of addressing an aspect of medicine (healing) not covered in the traditional medical curriculum. Workshops in Healing helped them to rediscover a deeper meaning to medicine and their roles as future healthcare professionals

    Carbon storage and functional diversity of tropical rainforest in the Congo Basin

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    “It is not a disease we treat, but a person”: Medical students’ reflections on their first rotations to an oncology and palliative care unit

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    The vast array of technologic advances in medicine has transformed traditional medical practice and education. However, these advances are not without their critics (1-7). Some medical educators and students suggest that the “final product” of medical education has many of the characteristics of the applied scientist (2) rather than those of the humane physician-healer (8). Many medical students bring to their studies an idealism and an empathy that, for many, is quickly eroded over time. According to Bellini and Shea (4), they may never fully recover their empathy. Several studies have concluded that a significant decline in empathy occurs during the third year of medical school, a time when empathy is most important because students are having their initial interactions with patients (6, 9). Shapiro has written extensively on current limitations in medical education (7, 10, 11). These include: an overemphasis on logico-scientific thinking, problem solving, and control; a devaluation of personal identity; a discounting of personal experience; and the practice of encouraging medical students to create a distance between themselves and patients. Such factors have significant implications for the way trained physicians will see their patients, for the quality of vocational satisfaction they will experience, and for their sustainability within the healthcare system (12). In 2009, the undergraduate medical curriculum at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, was expanded to include (inter alia) a significant component of reflective practice in students’ clinical activities. As a result of this curricular change, undergraduate medical students are now required to submit written reflections on their learning experiences. This compulsory report documents students’ impressions of their first four-week rotation and their exposure to patients in an oncology and palliative care setting. The aims of the current study were to analyze students’ reflections in order to determine the personal/professional impact of the rotation, to report on student responses to the new teaching curriculum, and to identify additional steps that could be taken to support students’ learning activities

    Salient practices of award-winning undergraduate research mentors: Balancing freedom and control to achieve excellence

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    This paper contributes to research on teaching excellence by extending the current body of literature pertaining to mentoring pedagogies in undergraduate research settings across diverse social, institutional and disciplinary contexts. Our data comes from in-depth interviews with 32 international faculty who have received excellence awards for undergraduate research mentoring. The data reveal a freedom - control dialectic, illuminating the ways in which expert mentors negotiate the desire to create opportunities for students to experience freedom and creativity in research, yet maintain control over the topic, quality and outcomes. The research findings reveal a defining characteristic of award-winning mentors as an ability to establish and sustain a sense of challenge, while maintaining meaningful engagement and a sense of achievement amongst students. The findings show the importance of tailoring practice to the needs of particular student groups, and there are implications for institutional resourcing, as well as mentor training and development

    Xanthomonas wilt of banana: Training manual

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    Module 1: What causes Xanthomonas wilt disease and how to recognize it Module 2: How to prevent Xanthomonas wilt Module 3: Which actions to take to control Xanthomonas wilt when it is detected on a farm Module 4: Xanthomonas wilt management in practice: avoiding common pitfall

    Making sense of a diagnosis of incurable cancer: The importance of communication

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    Purpose:  Patients diagnosed with incurable cancer may experience existential distressand difficulty in re-appraising their lives because of uncertainty about the future. Objectives: This study sought to understand how patients living with incurable cancer made sense of their diagnosis, how they prepared for the future and what support they wanted from their health professionals.  Subjects:  27 patients were recruited from the oncology and palliative care service at three metropolitan hospitals. Methods:  A qualitative research approach was used. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim.  Data was analyzed using the constant-comparative method.  Results:  Participants did not express a need to make sense of their diagnosis nor always ascribe to a particular religious belief; rather, many relied on a personal spirituality or philosophy to bring meaning to their experience. Importance was placed on their doctor keeping up with technology, being honest, and being confident and positive. Conclusion:  Participants in this study had incurable cancer but making sense of their current situation was not a conscious priority. For these patients, uncertainty was a positive, as certainty for them indicates death is approaching. What these interviews suggest, from the patient’s perspective, is that there is an implied contract between doctor and patient during this period which involves the doctor managing the flow of difficult information so that the patient can maintain normality for as long as possible. Understanding this helps to explain the difficulty of having advance care planning conversations within this setting, despite the many opportunities that a longer disease trajectory would seem to offer.

    Flétrissement bactérien du bananier: Manuel de formation

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    Module 1: Quelle est la cause de la maladie du flétrissement bactérien et comment la reconnaßtre Module 2: Comment prévenir le flétrissement bactérien du bananier Module 3: Quelles actions entreprendre pour lutter contre le flétrissement bactérien lorsqu'il est détecté dans une exploitation Module 4: Gestion du flétrissement bactérien du bananier dans la pratique: éviter les piÚges les plus courant

    Assessing the host status of banana and other plant species to the enset root mealybug Paraputo ensete (Williams & Matile-Ferrero) (Hem.: Pseudococcidae) in Ethiopia.

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    Ninety backyard gardens in the south-eastern Ethiopian highlands with enset (Ensete ventricosum (Welw.) Cheesman), banana and various annual crops were assessed for the presence of enset root mealybugs (Paraputo ensete (Williams & Matile-Ferrero)). This study presents the first observation of enset root mealybugs on banana. This pest has until now been exclusively recorded on enset in Ethiopia. In the Dilla Zuria district of the Gedeo zone, southern Ethiopia, infested banana mats of the ‘Pisang Awak’ (ABB genome) landrace were observed adjacent to infested enset plants in three small-holder backyard gardens. As roots of banana mats and enset plants were overlapping and intertwined, and large numbers of mealybugs were observed on enset roots, possibly representing an overpopulation, the observed mealybugs on banana might have represented a “chance infestation". The smaller size of mealybugs on banana roots might indicate a non-optimal host status of this crop. Experimental choice and no-choice pot trials however provided another indication of the possible host potential of ‘Pisang Awak’ and of an additional banana cultivar ‘Matooke’ (AAA-East African Highland). The enset root mealybug was able to fully develop, produce viable offspring and survive on both banana cultivars. Not all investigated banana cultivars presented this host status, and the susceptibility of most Musa cultivars remains low

    First report of the enset root mealybug Paraputo ensete (Williams & Matile Ferrero) (Hem.: Pseudococcidae) on banana in Ethiopia.

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    Enset root mealybugs, a major pest affecting the cultivation of the enset crop in the Ethiopian highlands, have for the first time been observed on banana mats indicating the potential host status of Musa spp. These observations were made under natural conditions in backyard gardens in the Gedeo zone, southern Ethiopia, on the root system of banana mats of the ‘Pisang Awak’ (local name ‘Feranji Muz’, ABB genome group) landrace. Here, we confirm the identification of the collected enset root mealybug specimens on banana mat root systems as Paraputo ensete (Williams & Matile-Ferrero) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) through DNA analysis

    Mentor perspectives on the place of undergraduate research mentoring in academic identity and career development: An analysis of award winning mentors

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    The aim of this study was to determine how Undergraduate Research (UR) mentoring fits into the career profile of award-winning UR mentors and to determine the factors that motivate engagement as UR mentor. Twenty-four award-winning UR mentors based in four countries were interviewed about their mentoring practices. Six themes emerged: 1) Academic Identity and Motivations; 2) Challenges to Academic Identity and Career Development; 3) Enhanced Research Productivity; 4) Recognition and Reward; 5) Institution Values Commitment and 6) Developing Other Mentors. In addition to explaining these themes, the authors discuss how the findings can be utilized for academic development and identity formation for faculty
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