70 research outputs found

    Book Review: Gender Justice, Education and Equality:Creating Capabilities for Girls’ and Women’s Development

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    Education is a basic human right; “everyone has the right education” as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights recognised in 1948 (UNESCO, 2007). However, many girls and women cannot access education due to persistent gender bias and inequalities in societies (UNESCO, 2014). As Cin (2017) highlights in her book, around the world, approximately “65 million girls are not schooled and two-thirds of the world’s 774 million illiterate are female” (p.3). Even though it is well-known that access to a quality of education helps to eliminate gender bias and patriarchal values that exist in societies, most of the current educational systems across the world reflect and reproduce gender inequalities and prejudices

    Basic education and hegemony in Turkey: thinking on ideology, policymaking and civil society

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    This thesis is concerned with the latest education reform, called 4+4+4 (4+), and overall educational changes in the basic education system (K12) since 2002 by the governing Justice and Development Party (AKP). The study investigates the role that education plays in state formation processes as well as looking at how dominant groups’ ideologies influence education policies. The research problem is the extent to which the state uses education policies to create a new public ideology. There are three key research questions that this thesis addresses. The data for this research was obtained from fifteen semi-structured interviews conducted with teacher trade unions, journalists and policy makers, focusing on their experiences and views not only about the 4+4+4 education system but also about the policymaking process in Turkey. The interviews present the pressing issues within the education system and indicate how education works a state apparatus for the government to gain and secure society’s consent. Located in a critical tradition, the research draws its theoretical framework from the Italian theorist Antonio Gramsci, especially focusing on his concepts of hegemony, civil society and consent. Using a Gramscian theoretical framework allows this study to place the 4+ reform in a bigger picture. The thesis analyses the reform not only from a local perspective but also from an international education policy perspective, focusing on the relationship between power, ideology and schooling. The findings suggest that the state and its private associations (i.e. media, and political parties) are actively encouraging Islamisation along with neoliberalism in order to consolidate their hegemonic dominance

    Aspire Higher End of Year Report

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    In 2022-23, Aspire Higher continued to deliver a sustained and progressive programme of outreach to students in Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire, and Northamptonshire. This academic year also marked the beginning of a transition to a focus on attainment raising in line with the changing national objectives of the Uni Connect programme, which will continue into 2023-24. This report showcases the approach of the Aspire Higher Uni Connect partnership during this year. The partnership engaged with 4,905 learners from target wards during the 2022-23 academic year. Of these learners, 2,275 had three or more instances of engagement within the academic year.<br/

    Aspire Higher End of Year Report

    Get PDF
    In 2022-23, Aspire Higher continued to deliver a sustained and progressive programme of outreach to students in Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire, and Northamptonshire. This academic year also marked the beginning of a transition to a focus on attainment raising in line with the changing national objectives of the Uni Connect programme, which will continue into 2023-24. This report showcases the approach of the Aspire Higher Uni Connect partnership during this year. The partnership engaged with 4,905 learners from target wards during the 2022-23 academic year. Of these learners, 2,275 had three or more instances of engagement within the academic year.<br/

    Building Capabilities of Youth Through Participatory Oral History Project: The South Hebron Hills, a Palestinian Case Study

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    Drawing from the capabilities approach (Sen 1999; Nussbaum 2000) and reflecting on Fricker’s (2007) epistemic (in)justice, this paper seeks to explain how a participatory oral history project enabled youth researchers in Palestine to increase their capabilities to participate in political and social life in their communities by fostering their attachment to the land and by increasing understanding of their cultural heritage. Due to the occupation, Palestinian youth researchers have been exposed to epistemic inequalities. They have been systematically prevented from exercising their political functionings; they cannot voice their ideas on freedom, heritage and land. Findings show that through participatory research, the youth researchers took an active role in their communities to cultivate their epistemic abilities to be the narrators of their own stories and to create public advocacy. Whilst acknowledging the intersectional power dynamics and oppression that govern their lives, the paper explores the possibility of participatory research in redressing epistemic injustices caused by structural inequalities and in disrupting colonial relations of domination. The research indicates that even in politically fragile contexts, participatory research can promote critical reflection, challenge the social imaginaries stigmatising the youth, and provide opportunities to develop political capabilities for social and public advocacy

    Jon Egging Trust Final Report

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    Jon Egging Trust (JET) believe that every young person should have access to the same quality of opportunities and leave school with the confidence, resilience, and self-belief to succeed and fulfil their potential. With this objective in view, JET offers long-term support to young people from vulnerable backgrounds who are likely to struggle to engage at school. JET delivers outreach programmes named Blue Skies (Level 1,2,3) and Inspirational Outreach (bespoke impact days) to young people to raise their aspirations and empower them. The programmes are delivered with a range of partners, including the RAF (Scampton, Odiham, Wittering, Waddington, Brize, Coningsby, Marham, Valley, Honington, and Cranwell), NATs, Northrop Grumman, BAE Systems, Microsoft, QinetiQ, Boeing, Rolls Royce, and Ascent(see Appendix E for a full list of partners). JET’s provision is unique nationally in the breadth and scope of its work which complements the school curriculum. Indeed, the research team is not aware of another third sector organisation that provides such in-depth support within schools at the secondary education level; this means that JET has a Unique Selling Point through its work to support young people. The evaluation of JET’s Youth Programme has been undertaken by the Institute for Social Innovation and Impact (ISII) at the University of Northampton. This report presents the full evaluation of the JET Youth Programme and includes a literature review; methods; data collection and analysis; limitations; and recommendations sections. The data showcases data collected between April 2021 and January 2022, including qualitative data (semi-structured interviews, and the implementation of Photostories), and quantitative data (the ISII questionnaire and data from JET). Overall, the ISII’s evaluation indicates that JET activities provide students with the feeling of being confident and empowered. Participating in initiatives such as those delivered by JET contributes to young people’s self-esteem and empowerment, as the initiatives build young people’s confidence. It strengthens relationships with the people around them and their organisations and helps young people in their education and personal development

    Is education for all? The experiences of ethnic minority students and teachers in North-western Vietnam engaging with social entrepreneurship

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    This paper discusses the challenges teachers and ethnic minority students face living in rural North-western Vietnam and how social entrepreneurship can mitigate these. The data was gathered through 33 interviews (teachers N=10; students N=20; parents of a student N=2; social entrepreneur N=1). The data were analysed using thematic analysis, drawing from Fraser’s (2010) justice model. The paper also links to Granovetter’s (1985;2005) social embeddedness concept, to emphasise how social enterprise enabled socio-economic networks can support ethnic minority students to overcome redistribution, representation and recognition problems. The paper makes an original contribution by showing how socio-economic networks enhance weak-ties and bridge resources to empower the socially disadvantaged to achieve educational inclusion
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