17 research outputs found

    Post Method Survival

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    AbstractThere are lots of criticisms vis-√†-vis postmethod which have receiveda great deal of attention in recent years by finding it more theoretical than practical. These criticisms inaugurate with the point that too much emphasis on postmethod methodology might cause a chaos in teaching particularly apropos novice teachers; among which Teacher's over-responsibility, Teacher's alibi, andTeacher's one-sleeved straitjacket are discussed in this paper. To answer these criticisms this study historically, theoretically ‚Äď and critically ‚Äď delves into the concept of post method and proposes some solution, Teacher metamorphosis, Teacher education, andTeacher freedom, to justify the concept of postmethod

    Metamorphosis of a teacher educator: A journey towards a more critical self

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    Critical teacher education emerged as a response to the liberal, hegemonic, and power-oriented world that affected teacher education as well. Albeit widely discussed, moving towards becoming this type of teacher educator is neither easy nor fast. This autoethnographic narrative study describes my journey as a teacher educator from a non-critical, product-oriented, passive teacher educator to a more critical, process- oriented, active teacher educator who learns, questions, relearns, and unlearns. The data are gathered from different sources of my personal portfolio, including training diaries, field notes, memories, feedback, and observation. The findings of the study reveal the underlying factors that shape our thoughts, beliefs, and practices and how we can gain voice and agency and transform into critical teacher educators

    Teachers' personality types and their attitude toward receiving and employing postobservation feedback

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    Classroom observation has been long considered a power-ful tool for evaluating and monitoring teachers' perform-ance and progress. Teachers can benefit from the feedbackduring the postobservation conference but giving feedbackis not a simple skill and needs knowledge and training.Research on tackling postobservation problems remainsemerging and the aim of this study is to explore the rolethat a teacher's personality type‚Äďbased on DiSC personal-ity test‚Äźmight play in postobservation conferences andreaction to receiving feedback from the supervisor. Togather data, 20 nonnative EFL teachers were asked to takethe DiSC personality test to have their personality typesidentified, then they were observed three times, and eachtime they received feedback on their classroom manage-ment techniques. Results indicate that teachers withdifferent personality types act differently during thepostobservation conferences. While D and i styles areactive and tend to employ feedback moderately andstrongly in their classes, S and C styles are mostly passivewith the tendency of employing feedback moderately andweakly. The findings contribute to a better understandingof the role of personality types in teachers' tolerance ofcriticism and their tendency to apply the received feedbackin their future classes

    Teachers’ classroom interactional competence: Scale development and validation

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    Interactional competence has recently gained considerable attention in language education. As an aspect of this competence, classroom interactional competence has been in the limelight since Walsh’s (2006) delineation of this concept. However, there is no survey tool to measure teachers’ classroom interactional competence. To bridge this gap, the present study describes the development and validation of a teachers’ classroom interactional competence (TCIC) scale. An outline of the relevant literature related to classroom interactional competence is provided, along with the process of scale development and validation. An exploratory factor analysis of the data from a large sample of language teachers (N = 564) resulted in a 46-item scale that constituted nine factors, namely visual organizers, sociocultural interaction, questioning, interactional patterns, repair, language modification, turn taking, managerial interaction, and rhetorical script. The implications of the scale for the measurement and, in turn, the enhancement of teachers’ classroom interactional competence are discussed

    Formative assessment feedback to enhance the writing performance of Iranian IELTS candidates: Blending teacher and automated writing evaluation

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    With the incremental integration of technology in writing assessment, technology-generated feedback has found its way to take further steps toward replacing human corrective feedback and rating. Yet, further investigation is deemed necessary regarding its potential use either as a supplement to or replacement for human feedback. This study aims to investigate the effect of blending teacher and automated writing evaluation, as formative assessment feedback, on enhancing the writing performance among Iranian IELTS candidates. In this explanatory mixed-methods research, three groups of Iranian intermediate learners (N=31) completed six IELTS writing tasks during six consecutive weeks and received automated, teacher, and blended (automated + teacher) feedback modes respectively on different components of writing (task response, coherence and cohesion, lexical resource, grammatical range and accuracy). A structured written interview was also conducted to explore learners’ perception (attitude, clarity, preference) of the mode of feedback they received. Findings revealed that students who received teacher-only and blended feedback performed better in writing. Also, the blended feedback group outperformed the others regarding task response, the teacher feedback group in cohesion and coherence, and the automated feedback group in lexical resource. The analysis of the interviews revealed that the majority of the learners confirmed the clarity of all feedback modes and learners’ attitude about feedback modes was positive although they highly preferred the blended one. The findings suggest new ideas to facilitate learning and assessing writing and support the evidence that teachers can provide comprehensive, accurate, and continuous feedback as a means of formative assessment

    A922 Sequential measurement of 1 hour creatinine clearance (1-CRCL) in critically ill patients at risk of acute kidney injury (AKI)

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    Post Method Survival

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    Supplemental Material - Revisiting an Anti-Machiavellian model for teacher education: A critical perspective

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    Supplemental Material for Revisiting an Anti-Machiavellian model for teacher education: A critical perspective by Jaber Kamali in Power and Education.</p

    Figures 12-15 from: Kamran M, Khan EM, Alatawi FJ (2018) The spider mites of the genus Eutetranychus Banks (Acari, Trombidiformes, Tetranychidae) from Saudi Arabia: two new species, a re-description, and a key to the world species. ZooKeys 799: 47-88. https://doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.799.25541

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    Insight investigation of miscible SCCO2 Water Alternating Gas (WAG) injection performance in heterogeneous sandstone reservoirs

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    In this manuscript, we present the results of a systematic approach to investigate the impact of core scale heterogeneity on the efficiency of miscible CO2 water-alternating-gas (WAG) flooding performance. Both vertical (by layering two axially-cut half plugs with differing permeability) and horizontal (stacking two smaller core samples with differing permeability in series) heterogeneities are explored. In the layered or vertically heterogeneous sample, the permeability ratio (PR) defines the ratio between the permeability values of each half plug. Our special sample construction technique using either a thin impermeable Teflon sheet to prevent flow communication or a thin tissue to promote flow communication has enabled us to investigate the effect of crossflow between half plug on the performance of the WAG flood. For the stacked composite or the horizontally heterogeneous core samples, short cylindrical core segments were used each with a different permeability value. We have also investigated the effect of the EOR injection mode (i.e. secondary vs. tertiary) on our results. For this study, core flooding experiments were performed using n-C10, brine and CO2 at a temperature of 343 K and a pressure of 12.4 MPa. The results obtained for homogeneous, layered and composite samples indicate that CO2 WAG flood performs better in all cases and achieves the highest recovery factor (RF) when conducted under the secondary mode (e.g. homogeneous: 93.4%, layered: 74.0%, and composite: 90.9%) compared with the tertiary mode (e.g. homogeneous: 74.2%, layered: 64.1%, and composite: 71.3%). For the layered samples, it was found that the oil recovery decreases noticeably with an increase in the permeability ratio (PR). For instance, RFs of 93.4%, 90.1%, 78.8%, and 74.0% correspond to PRs of 1, 2.5, 5, and 12.5, respectively. In contrast to our previous findings with continuous CO2 flooding which showed that crossflow enhances recovery in layered samples, for this study using WAG, crossflow was found to negatively affect the RF. Such an outcome may be attributed to the conformance control achieved by WAG flooding which would be more pronounced in the case of non-communication layers (i.e. no cross flow). In other words, the higher oil recovery of WAG flooding in a non-communicating system may be due to the dominance of viscous forces and, to a lesser extent, the vanishing effect of gravity forces that tend to reduce sweep efficiency. The effect of composite heterogeneity on the RF was also investigated with the results showing that the permeability sequence along the length of a composite sample has a noticeable but more subtle impact on RF
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