4,399 research outputs found

    Archaeological Investigations of Hayes Shelter (40ML143) and Archaic Period Lithic Technology in the Central Duck River Basin, Tennessee

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    Hayes Shelter (40ML143) is a small rockshelter site located on the Duck River in Middle Tennessee. Archaeological investigations were conducted at the site during the summers of 1982 and 1983 by the University of Tennessee Department of Anthropology as part of the Columbia Archaeological Project. This thesis presents the results of these investigations and compares the lithic assemblages from Hayes Shelter with those recovered from seven additional sheltered sites and eight open sites in or near the Central Duck River Basin. By comparing the lithic assemblages from these 16 sites, information was gained on patterns of variability in the distribution of raw material types, tools, debitage, and flake debris. The resulting data suggest that on a regional basis, raw material selection strategies during the Middle Archaic commonly included locally available, but inferior quality cherts, while the strategies of the later periods relied on these resources less frequently. Models of prehistoric organizational strategies advanced through previous research have attempted to explain this pattern as reflecting a fundamental shift in settlement strategy, a shift necessitated by population crowding and resource scarcity resulting from the arid climatic conditions of the Hypsithermal Interval (ca. 8000 - 6000 B. P.). According to previous models, the distribution of lithics in tool and debitage classes and among flake debris reduction stages are also expected to show a shift at the Late Archaic transition. Middle Archaic assemblages are expected to be more homogeneous (more evenly distributed), while the later assemblages should have less even distributions, reflecting a more complex logistical strategy involving more long-distance transport of raw materials which were reduced in stages at various sites. However, the data in this study do not support the expected pattern. The composition of both Middle and Late Archaic assemblages in this sample appears to be influenced by resource selection, and this, in turn, is largely a function of site location. Change in raw material selection coincides with a climatic shift marked by increased precipitation at the close of the Hypsithermal Interval. It is suggested that restricted precipitation and a concomitant reduction in river and tributary discharge rates may have diminished the availability of usable chert gravels otherwise transported as bedload and deposited as lag gravel in the Central Duck River system. As a preliminary investigation of the regional patterns of lithic technology during the Archaic Period, this study suggests that site location (with respect to lithic resources) and site type (sheltered versus open-air) have considerable influence on the composition of lithic assemblages

    Alien Registration- Morrow, Joseph Herbert (Madison, Somerset County)

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    https://digitalmaine.com/alien_docs/7012/thumbnail.jp

    Effects of different levels of feeding on growth and development in beef cattle

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    There are many different views among herdsmen as to when a calf should be given extra milk from a nurse cow and as to how long a calf should be given extra milk. Some show calves are started on extra milk at a few days of age, while others are started from a few days to five to seven months of age. Some of the reasons for this wide variation in the age at which calves are started on nurse cows are: 1) a few breeders want to breed some top producing cows as quickly after calving as possible 2) poor milking cows; 3) variation in herdsman’s ideas on how to develop show calves; 4) variations in feeding and management conditions; 5) herdsmen sometimes misjudge a show prospect at an early age; and 6) cost of labor and extra cost of keeping a nurse cow. Where cattle are highly fitted for livestock shows or sales, the cost is much higher than the usual cost of developing animals for a breeding herd. However, it should be realized that the purpose is different. Cattle developed for shows are considered the show window of the herd. The added expense is considered by most breeders as part of the cost of an educational and advertising program. There are many opinions as to the difficulties and hazards involved in producing highly fitted cattle and then using them for breeding purposes. Some cattlemen believe that highly fitted heifers or bulls are slow or hard breeders and that many overly fat heifers are hard to settle”. Bulls are so fat that they are often slow breeders and often clumsy. Observations are that over-feeding cattle may affect the feet, causing excessive growing out of the toes, especially if the cattle are confined to email areas. Corns or quitters may develop between the toes, become painful and may cause slow breeders in the bulls. Some breeders and herdsmen believe that heifers that are very fat at time of calving often have difficulty and may have small calves. Many breeders believe that highly fitted heifers are poor milkers because of excess fat. Some herdsmen believe that highly fitted show heifers have very definitely retarded milk supply during the first lactation period, but that milking qualities may adjust to normal after the second or third calves Observations indicate that “rustling ability and activity of highly fitted heifers or cows are reduced. Thus, highly fitted cattle may not do as well as others where there is considerable competition for the feed supply. Likewise, some herdsmen feel that feeding and feeding practices re-suiting in excessive condition in cattle shorten their productive life. Feeding and fitting cattle for shows or sales, either with nurse cows and concentrate feeds or with concentrate feeds alone, produces an extra amount of weight and condition for the animal to carry above that considered satisfactory for normal productivity and reproduction. How much of this extra weight the brood cow needs and whether or not it has any harmful effects throughout the productive life is of concern to breeders and livestock men. The excessive accumulation of fat within the body tissue may also have harmful effects

    The Appealability of the Social Work Profession in the United States: Possible Explanations

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    In many parts of the world, the social work profession has continued to become a magnet for students from various backgrounds. This field has attracted local and international students with prior expertise in other disciplines, including but not limited to, sociology, psychology, criminal justice, education, and law. This chapter, among other things, presents an overview of the social work profession in the United States, highlights the uniqueness of this discipline, and explains the rise in enrollment in the twenty-first century. It is hypothesized that the appealability of social work is associated with (a) a quest for social justice, (b) a pragmatic path toward direct practice, (c) a commitment for social services delivery, and (d) a passion for empowerment. Understanding the rationale behind the appealability of the profession is crucial for social work educators to meet the needs of their student body in a world deeply ravaged by contemporary social problems

    Waltz Entrancing

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    https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/mmb-vp/2618/thumbnail.jp

    When The Song of Love Is Heard

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    https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/mmb-vp/6020/thumbnail.jp

    Women in Antebellum Alachua County, Florida

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    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role and status of women in Alachua County, Florida, from 1821 through 1860. The secondary literature suggests that women throughout America had virtually no public role to play in antebellum society except in limited circumstances in some mature urban, commercial settings. The study reviewed U.S. Census materials, slave ownership records, and land ownership records as a means to examine the family structures, the mobility and persistence of persons and households, and the economic status of women, particularly including woman headed households. The study also examined laws adopted by the Florida legislative bodies and court decisions of the local trial court and the state Supreme Court, church records of a local congregation, and the correspondence of women who lived in the county for portions of the antebellum period to focus on the relationships between men and women, particularly in household relationships. The principal conclusion of the study was that the most likely route to success for an antebellum frontier woman was through marriage to one who valued the many economic and personal contributions to household life she made. This was so despite the wealth that a very few widows built or maintained and even though Florida jurists differed in their approach on the extent to which married women should be treated as strictly subordinate to their husbands

    Sunshine Of Love : Song And Dance

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    https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/mmb-vp/4058/thumbnail.jp
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