204 research outputs found

    Cash Use in Australia: New Survey Evidence

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    The Reserve Bank has completed its second study of consumers' use of payment instruments. The study indicates that cash remains the most common form of payment by consumers. It is used extensively in situations where average payment values are low and where quick transaction times are preferred. Nonetheless, cash use as a share of total payments has declined, falling as a share of both the number and value of payments. Two important factors contributing to this decline are the substitution of cards for cash use, particularly for low-value payments, and the increasing adoption of online payments.withdrawals; payments; payments survey; transaction diary; payments use study; payments system; contactless payments; online payments

    Letter from John Bagnall to John Muir, 1900 Jan 13 .

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    1822 O\u27Tarrell StreetSan FranciscoJan. 13, 1900.Mr. Muir., Dear Sir & Kind Friend:I received to-day, (forwarded by Mrs. Swett,) the Ten dollars you have so kindly given me for a Christmas present. This, so generous of you, and so timely, for my means are limited, and such a present, spent carefully, a little at a time, enables me to buy things which I really need, but, which, if the means were lacking, I should be compelled to do without. Accept my grateful thoughts for your kindness, May God reward you a hundredfold, is my prayer 02653 When Death\u27s dark stream I ferry O\u27er, A time which surely shall come, - In Heaven itself, I\u27ll ask no more - Thank just a Highland Welcome. As ever,yours truly,John Bagnal

    Letter from John Bagnall to John Muir, 1883 Oct 23.

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    0110915 Elliot Park, Off Steiner, near Geary, San Francisco, Oct. 23, 1883.John [Bagnall?],-To Prof. John Muir:Dear Sir and Friend:Your Present, the “Box of Fine Grapes – came to hand last Evg., for which accept my best thank, You are well aware that, I fondly hoped, long ere this, to be able to reward my benevolent stedfast friends, with something more thanwords, but you know full well, the reason why I did not. I regret to say that my standing up for my rights as a man, some few years [Page 2]ago, seems to have brought me into general disfavor. But, however some of my friends may view the matter, I am convinced that the cause of my failure in “Stocks” was on account of the habit I had of giving way to the opinions of others for the sake of peace and quietness, until I lost confidence in my own judgment. But, by your continued kindness, I judge that you have still the same friendly feeling towards me. Give my kindest regards to Mrs Muir and to Dr. and Mrs. Strentzel. Be sure, if you please, to call and see me when – ever you have time.I remain as Ever yours truly John Bagnall.P.S. Please give my best respects to the “Swett Family” “on the next Ranch”.J. B

    Letter from John Bagnall to John Muir, 1882 Nov 6.

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    01081Hamilton Gram. School, Geary St. near Scott, San Francisco, Nov. 6, 1882.Mr. John Muir,Dear Sir and Kind Friend:That “Box of Grapes” you so Kindly sent, has come to hand. How can I sufficiently thank you for your many kindnesses? It is not the least of my grief, that, by missing that chance to make a fortune 4 years ago; [deleted: that] I put it out of my own power (perhaps Forever,) to reward my faithful, generous friends as they deserve.[Page 2]But if God does look down upon mortals, with loving will and power to do them good:- May He reward each and all of my friends, a thousand –fold. When you come to S.F. do call and see me, even if it is only for 5 minutes: - and especially, if Mrs. Muir should bring the “Baby” to town, I should, very much like to see it. My brotherly love to allYours truly John Bagnal

    Letter from John Bagnall to John Muir, 1878 Oct 20.

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    [4]Keep out of the way, so as not to inflict my- self on anybody. I doubt whether I shall ever over come it. The fact is Friend Muir I have been so unmercifully snubled through life, on account of my lameness that I feel it [illegible] to my [underlined: manhood] to put up with it. And although lonesomeness is terrific on a sociable dis- position like mine, it is no disgrace for me to retreat be- fore such unjust, and over- whelming odds. Go on, Dear friend, and “May Heaven help you” to describe the wonders of your travels, as only John Muir can. Truly Yours, John Bagnall. 00819 [1] 356 Jessie Street San Francisco, Cal. Oct. 20, 1878.Mr. Muir,Dear Sir and Friend: I was so glad to receive your letter, for I often think of you as fairly [underlined: reveling] among the wonders & beauties of nature! How often it occurs to me, that I would like to be [underlined: able] to be with you, even in the most humble capa- city - - For I should be in very Heaven, And feel [underlined: new life], by Nature given! I feel almost as though I could drop the sympathetic tear, for those poor fellows who lay in the grave yards of[Page 2][2]White pine, for, although some, if they had made money would have squander- ed it, many no doubt earnestly worked for a “pile”: — “Not for to hide it in a hedge, Nor for a train Attendant; But for the [underlined: glorious privilege] Of being [underlined independent..”] I have noticed that almost death-like stillness, (to which you refer)- in the deserted mining camps of Cal. It seemed as though most of the people had gone to a funeral; the few who remained, looked as though they had already at- tended the funeral of their hopes. [3]I heard that you, and the company, had indeed been “Thirsty” “Nearly unto death”, and of your almost miraculous escape, pray do not venture too far; — I know you are as brave as a lion, in prosecuting your researches, but what a dreadful cut, it would be to us all, to [underlined: lose] you [underlined: in such a way!] My health is reason- ably good, though last Winter was so severe upon me that I have had the irksome task, of taking care of myself, most of the time since. I cannot, as yet, overcome that depression of Spirits, that desire t

    Letter from John Bagnall to John Muir, 1882 Nov 6.

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    01081Hamilton Gram. School, Geary St. near Scott, San Francisco, Nov. 6, 1882.Mr. John Muir,Dear Sir and Kind Friend:That “Box of Grapes” you so Kindly sent, has come to hand. How can I sufficiently thank you for your many kindnesses? It is not the least of my grief, that, by missing that chance to make a fortune 4 years ago; [deleted: that] I put it out of my own power (perhaps Forever,) to reward my faithful, generous friends as they deserve.[Page 2]But if God does look down upon mortals, with loving will and power to do them good:- May He reward each and all of my friends, a thousand –fold. When you come to S.F. do call and see me, even if it is only for 5 minutes: - and especially, if Mrs. Muir should bring the “Baby” to town, I should, very much like to see it. My brotherly love to allYours truly John Bagnal

    Britain and the Falklands : International Perspectives 1982-1990

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    Ph. D. Thesis.The Falklands dispute revolved around a group of small islands, the sovereignty of which was claimed by two nations. However, once conflict broke in April 1982, the dispute took an international dimension. States were drawn in by their relationships with Britain and Argentina. This thesis seeks to examine to what extent there was an international reaction to the crisis and offer a comparison between the international reactions to the dispute, seeking to draw common themes, and thus offers a comparative history of international receptions to the conflict. Although, the Falklands conflict has been covered in depth in both academic and other text, the historiography lacks a detailed survey of the international response. In presenting a comparative study of international reactions to the dispute, this thesis contributes to understanding to what extent the ‘Falklands Factor’, the phenomenon in Britain that boosted support for the Conservative government, was a shared phenomenon elsewhere in the world. This study examines nations in a number of different international organisations and assesses the influencing factors behind their reaction to the crisis. Although these organisations held much power and influence, their ability to wield such influence was limited in how the situation was viewed by the individual member states. The groups examined in this thesis were all formed out of individual nations that at some point held a shared ethos or goal which encouraged them to come together in the form of governmental coalition. However, in a bipolar world, the individual components that made up the collective, often prioritised their own objectives over those of the organisation. The conflict and subsequent debates highlighted how this phenomenon not only affected international response to the Falklands crisis but how it could also influence relations between states. Although the conflict has been covered in detail, it has in the main been looked at in a national and exceptionalist context. This work offers a transnational perspective through comparison between different reactions in states, offering a contribution to our understanding of the crisis’ impact.Masonic Charitable Fun

    Dying from acute stroke: orchestrating an autoethnographic sonata of care

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    A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the University of Wolverhampton for the degree of Professional Doctorate in Health and Wellbeing.This authoethnographic study draws together the experiences of the researcher and bereaved family members of patients who died in hospital following an acute stroke. It takes the form of a Sonata Framework that mirrors the author’s narrative around the duration and onset of his mother’s stroke, hospital care and ultimate discharge home to die. Although symptoms experienced by individuals with malignant and non-malignant disease are similar, evidence suggests the transition from acute to palliative care remains problematic for patients following an acute stroke, not least when seeking to identify when someone is nearing end of life. A qualitative interview study aimed to explore the personal experiences of family members whose relative had died following admission to an acute stroke ward. In order to do this, six adult relatives of patients who died in hospital following an acute stroke were interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule. Data were inductively analysed to produce basic, organising and global themes, and presented in the form of thematic networks: The Family Experience and Dying & Death. Further findings were deductively derived through the lens of the Sonata Framework. Findings suggested shortfalls in the provision of palliative and end of life care following acute stroke, although areas of good practice were identified. Overall, participants were complimentary of the care provided to their family member although the transition from acute to palliative was variable. The quality of communication between patients, relatives and staff was patchy, with no evidence of engagement with the hospital palliative care team, nor any discussions instigated by staff relating to preferred place of death. This study provided evidence of some improvement in local palliative and end of life care provision when compared with previous research, although gaps in such provision still exist. Staff should receive palliative and end of life care training, including communication skills training to identify individuals who may be nearing the end of life and to instigate timely conversations with their family members. Further research relating to the provision of palliative and end of life care for individuals following an acute stroke is recommended

    Biography of Robin John Bagnall

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    Biography of the veterinarian Robin John Bagnall. The biography includes information about his education and career, scientific contributions and writings, homages and distinctions.ab202
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