39 research outputs found

    Table_1_Research on application of radiomics in glioma: a bibliometric and visual analysis.pdf

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    BackgroundWith the continuous development of medical imaging informatics technology, radiomics has become a new and evolving field in medical applications. Radiomics aims to be an aid to support clinical decision making by extracting quantitative features from medical images and has a very wide range of applications. The purpose of this study was to perform a bibliometric and visual analysis of scientific results and research trends in the research application of radiomics in glioma.MethodsWe searched the Web of Science Core Collection (WOScc) for publications related to glioma radiomics. A bibliometric and visual analysis of online publications in this field related to countries/regions, authors, journals, references and keywords was performed using CiteSpace and R software.ResultsA total of 587 relevant literature published from 2012 to September 2022 were retrieved in WOScc, and finally a total of 484 publications were obtained according to the filtering criteria, including 393 (81.20%) articles and 91 (18.80%) reviews. The number of relevant publications increases year by year. The highest number of publications was from the USA (171 articles, 35.33%) and China (170 articles, 35.12%). The research institution with the highest number of publications was Chinese Acad Sci (24), followed by Univ Penn (22) and Fudan Univ (21). WANG Y (27) had the most publications, followed by LI Y (22), and WANG J (20). Among the 555 co-cited authors, LOUIS DN (207) and KICKINGEREDER P (207) were the most cited authors. FRONTIERS IN ONCOLOGY (42) was the most published journal and NEURO-ONCOLOGY (412) was the most co-cited journal. The most frequent keywords in all publications included glioblastoma (187), survival (136), classification (131), magnetic resonance imaging (113), machine learning (100), tumor (82), and feature (79), central nervous system (66), IDH (57), and radiomics (55). Cluster analysis was performed on the basis of keyword co-occurrence, and a total of 16 clusters were formed, indicating that these directions are the current hotspots of radiomics research applications in glioma and may be the future directions of continuous development.ConclusionIn the past decade, radiomics has received much attention in the medical field and has been widely used in clinical research applications. Cooperation and communication between countries/regions need to be enhanced in future research to promote the development of radiomics in the field of medicine. In addition, the application of radiomics has improved the accuracy of pre-treatment diagnosis, efficacy prediction and prognosis assessment of glioma and helped to promote the development into precision medicine, the future still faces many challenges.</p

    DM and DMA rat model induced by STZ injection.

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    <p>Time course of blood glucose concentration (<b>A</b>), body weight (<b>B</b>) and paw withdrawal threshold (<b>C</b>) alterations after STZ or citrate buffer (vehicle) treatment. Data are presented as meanS.E.M. (n = 30), **<i>P</i><0.01 <i>vs</i>. vehicle control.</p

    Immunofluorescent staining of TRPV1 and analysis of its expression pattern in DRG neurons at varying time points after the establishment of DMA.

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    <p><b>A–E</b>, representative photographs of TRPV1 staining in DRG of different groups. <b>F</b>, illustration of the percentage of TRPV1-IR neurons over total neurons in vehicle, DMA 7 d, 14 d, 21 d and 28 d group (n = 4–6). <b>G</b>, histogram for size distribution of TRPV1-IR neurons. Note the decreased distribution of TRPV1 in neurons with cross-sectional area larger than 400–500 and increased distribution of this protein within the range of 100–400 µm<sup>2</sup> (n = 4–6). <b>H</b>, comparison of the optical density due to TRPV1 immunostaining in small-sized (100–500 µm<sup>2</sup>) and medium-sized (500–1200 µm<sup>2</sup>) DRG neurons of different groups (n = 4–6). *<i>P</i><0.05, **<i>P</i><0.01 <i>vs</i>. vehicle control. Scale bar  = 100 µm.</p

    Single intrathecal application of TRPV1 antagonists alleviates mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia.

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    <p><b>A</b> and <b>B</b>, single application of RR and CPZ at varing doses caused differential inhibition of mechanical sensitivity of DMA rats. <b>C</b>, single application of RR and CPZ at high dose caused significant inhibition of thermal hyperalgesia in DM rats. *<i>P</i><0.05, **<i>P</i><0.01 <i>vs</i>. vehicle control of the same time. <sup>#</sup><i>P</i><0.05, <sup>##</sup><i>P</i><0.01 <i>vs</i>. drugs of middle dose.</p

    Multiple intrathecal applications of TRPV1 antagonists cumulatively antagonize mechanical allodynia.

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    <p><b>A</b> and <b>B</b>, long-term effects of multiple applications of ruthenium red and capsazepine for consecutive 7 days (n = 6). <b>C</b> and <b>D</b>, reconstruction of the decay response diagram from <b>A</b> and <b>B</b> after the withdrawal of RR (<b>A</b>) and CPZ (<b>B</b>) (n = 6).The value in longitudinal axis was normalized by the thresholds value on DMA 20 d. The linear regressions were performed to calculate the decay rates and to evaluate the half decay times (‘Decay<sub>50</sub>’), and the results are shown above the plots. *<i>P</i><0.05, **<i>P</i><0.01 <i>vs</i>. vehicle control of the same time. <sup>#</sup><i>P</i><0.05, <sup>##</sup><i>P</i><0.01 <i>vs</i>. drugs of middle dose.</p

    Immunofluorescent staining of TRPV1 in plantar skin of hind paw with the progression of DMA.

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    <p>A–E, typical photograsph of TRPV1 immunoreactivities in vehicle and DMA model rats at varied time points. A′–C′, the magnified pictures from the rectangle areas in A–C. F, optical density analysis of TRPV1 immunoreactivities in epidermis and dermis displaying strong enhancement on DMA 7 d and 14 d. Sc, Ep and De are the abbreviation of stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis, respectively. Scale bar  = 20 µm</p

    Immunofluorescent staining of TRPV1 in spinal dorsal horn (SDH) with the progression of DMA.

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    <p><b>A–E</b>, representative photographs of TRPV1 staining in SDH in vehicle, DMA 7 d, 14 d, 21 d and 28 d groups. <b>F</b>, optical density analysis of TRPV1 staining in SDH showing the increased TRPV1-IR neurons on DMA 7 d and 14 d group (n = 4–6). Scale bar  = 100 µm.</p

    Restoration of finger and thumb movement using one-stage free muscle transplantation

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    <p><i>Objective</i>: Functional reconstruction following severe traumatic muscle loss may cause problems for reconstructive surgeons. In such situations, functioning free muscle transplantation (FFMT) represents an important alternative treatment option.</p> <p><i>Methods</i>: The clinico-demographic characteristics of 11 patients receiving modified FFMT between 2005–2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The muscle strength, range of joint motion (ROM), total active motion (TAM) of the fingers, and Disability of Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score were adopted to assess the functional results.</p> <p><i>Results</i>: All FFMTs were performed in the secondary stage. The authors found that the mean ROM, TAM, ratio of TAM compared with the contralateral side, and DASH score were 112 degrees, 150 degrees, 62%, and 22.8, respectively; and eight and nine patients achieved greatly improved grip function and M4 muscle strength, respectively.</p> <p><i>Conclusion</i>: Using one-stage free muscle transplantation to restore finger and thumb movement simultaneously is an effective method for functional restoration following traumatic multi-muscle loss.</p
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