122 research outputs found

    Review Of Changes In Income Inequality Within U.S. Metropolitain Areas By J.F. Madden

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    A New Statistic: The US Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure

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    This article examines the dynamic relationship between macroeconomic performance and measures of poverty in the United States. The article is organized as follows. Section 2 presents insights on the relationship between poverty and macroeconomic performance that emerge from the literature. The emphasis is on empirical studies from 1986 to 2011. Section 3 provides a snapshot of the change in poverty over National Bureau of Economic Research-dated recessions for a variety of poverty measures. Section 4 uses vector autoregressions (VARs) to characterize the response of poverty to innovations in various social indicators and measures of macroeconomic performance. Section 5 expands the empirical analysis to include alternative measures of poverty—a consumption-based poverty rate constructed by Meyer and Sullivan (2010) and an income-based poverty rate constructed by Broda and colleagues (2009) by using a consumer price index that has been adjusted for substitution and quality bias. Section 6 conducts a forecasting exercise for income poverty and consumption poverty. Section 7 concludes and offers suggestions for future research

    Deriving The GLS Transformation Parameter In Elementary Panel Data Models

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    The Generalized Least Squares (GLS) transformation that eliminates serial correlation in the error terms is central to a complete understanding of the relationship between the pooled OLS, random effects, and fixed effects estimators. A significant hurdle to attainment of that understanding is the calculation of the parameter that delivers the desired transformation. This paper derives this critical parameter in the benchmark case typically used to introduce these estimators using nothing more than elementary statistics (mean, variance, and covariance) and the quadratic formula

    Poverty: A Very Short Introduction

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    No one wants to live in poverty. Few people would want others to do so. Yet, we find ourselves in a situation where millions of people worldwide live in poverty. According to the World Bank in 2010, 1.2 billion people lived below the extreme poverty line with an income of US 1.25orlessadayand2.4billionlivedonlessthanUS1.25 or less a day and 2.4 billion lived on less than US 2 a day. Why is that? What has been done about it in the past? And what is being done about it now? In this Very Short Introduction Philip N. Jefferson explores how the answers to these questions lie in the social, political, economic, educational, and technological processes that impact all of us throughout our lives. The degree of vulnerability is all that differentiates us. He shows how a person\u27s level of vulnerability to adverse changes in their life is very much dependent on the circumstances of their birth, including where their family lived, the schools they attended, whether it was peacetime or wartime, whether they had access to clean water, and whether they are male or female. Arguing that while poverty is ancient and enduring, the conversation about it is always new and evolving, Jefferson looks at the history of poverty, and the practical and analytical efforts we have made to eradicate it, and the prospects for further poverty alleviation in the future

    Economic Lessons

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    Poverty Volatility And Macroeconomic Quiescence

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    Where Has All The Exuberance Gone?

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    Does Monetary Policy Affect Relative Educational Unemployment Rates?

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    The Oxford Handbook Of The Economics Of Poverty

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    Liberal Arts Colleges And The Production Of PhD Economists

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    Data from the National Science Foundation (2014) indicate that at least one PhD in economics was awarded to a Swarthmore College graduate in every year since 1966. The authors’ purpose in this article is to consider factors that may have contributed to the high number of PhDs in economics awarded to Swarthmore College graduates. While there is little doubt that self-selection plays a significant role, they describe curricular and environmental aspects of the economics department at Swarthmore that may have contributed to this outcome
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