4,604 research outputs found

    Comparison of Horace and Photos Algorithms for Multi-Photon Emission in the Context of the W Boson Mass Measurement

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    The W boson mass measurement is sensitive to QED radiative corrections due to virtual photon loops and real photon emission. The largest shift in the measured mass, which depends on the transverse momentum spectrum of the charged lepton from the boson decay, is caused by the emission of real photons from the final-state lepton. There are a number of calculations and codes available to model the final-state photon emission. We perform a detailed study, comparing the results from the Horace and Photos implementations of the final-state multi-photon emission in the context of a direct measurement of the W boson mass at the Tevatron. Mass fits are performed using a simulation of the CDF II detector

    Precision measurement of the W boson mass at CDF

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    A measurement of the mass of the W boson, MW, is presented using 2.2 fb−1 of the data from pp collisions at √s = 1.96TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass is determined by fitting simulated signal and background distributions to 470126 W candidates decaying to eÎœe and 624708 decaying to ΌΜΌ. The result is MW = 80387±19MeV and is the most precise determination of the mass to date

    Interplay between Kondo physics and spin-orbit coupling in carbon nanotube quantum dots

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    We investigate the influence of spin-orbit coupling on the Kondo effects in carbon nanotube quantum dots, using the numerical renormalization group technique. A sufficiently large spin-orbit coupling is shown to destroy the SU(4) Kondo effects at zero magnetic field, leaving only two SU(2) Kondo effects in the one- and three-electron Coulomb blockade valleys. On applying a finite magnetic field, two additional, spin-orbit induced SU(2) Kondo effects arise in the three- and two-electron valleys. Using physically realistic model parameters, we calculate the differential conductance over a range of gate voltages, temperatures and fields. The results agree well with measurements from two different experimental devices in the literature, and explain a number of observations that are not described within the standard framework of the SU(4) Anderson impurity model.Comment: 15 pages, 11 figure

    Chemical fracture and distribution of extreme values

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    When a corrosive solution reaches the limits of a solid sample, a chemical fracture occurs. An analytical theory for the probability of this chemical fracture is proposed and confirmed by extensive numerical experiments on a two dimensional model. This theory follows from the general probability theory of extreme events given by Gumbel. The analytic law differs from the Weibull law commonly used to describe mechanical failures for brittle materials. However a three parameters fit with the Weibull law gives good results, confirming the empirical value of this kind of analysis.Comment: 7 pages, 5 figures, to appear in Europhysics Letter

    Data production models for the CDF experiment

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    The data production for the CDF experiment is conducted on a large Linux PC farm designed to meet the needs of data collection at a maximum rate of 40 MByte/sec. We present two data production models that exploits advances in computing and communication technology. The first production farm is a centralized system that has achieved a stable data processing rate of approximately 2 TByte per day. The recently upgraded farm is migrated to the SAM (Sequential Access to data via Metadata) data handling system. The software and hardware of the CDF production farms has been successful in providing large computing and data throughput capacity to the experiment.Comment: 8 pages, 9 figures; presented at HPC Asia2005, Beijing, China, Nov 30 - Dec 3, 200

    Data processing model for the CDF experiment

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    The data processing model for the CDF experiment is described. Data processing reconstructs events from parallel data streams taken with different combinations of physics event triggers and further splits the events into datasets of specialized physics datasets. The design of the processing control system faces strict requirements on bookkeeping records, which trace the status of data files and event contents during processing and storage. The computing architecture was updated to meet the mass data flow of the Run II data collection, recently upgraded to a maximum rate of 40 MByte/sec. The data processing facility consists of a large cluster of Linux computers with data movement managed by the CDF data handling system to a multi-petaByte Enstore tape library. The latest processing cycle has achieved a stable speed of 35 MByte/sec (3 TByte/day). It can be readily scaled by increasing CPU and data-handling capacity as required.Comment: 12 pages, 10 figures, submitted to IEEE-TN

    CMS Connect

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    The CMS experiment collects and analyzes large amounts of data coming from high energy particle collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. This involves a huge amount of real and simulated data processing that needs to be handled in batch-oriented platforms. The CMS Global Pool of computing resources provide +100K dedicated CPU cores and another 50K to 100K CPU cores from opportunistic resources for these kind of tasks and even though production and event processing analysis workflows are already managed by existing tools, there is still a lack of support to submit final stage condor-like analysis jobs familiar to Tier-3 or local Computing Facilities users into these distributed resources in an integrated (with other CMS services) and friendly way. CMS Connect is a set of computing tools and services designed to augment existing services in the CMS Physics community focusing on these kind of condor analysis jobs. It is based on the CI-Connect platform developed by the Open Science Grid and uses the CMS GlideInWMS infrastructure to transparently plug CMS global grid resources into a virtual pool accessed via a single submission machine. This paper describes the specific developments and deployment of CMS Connect beyond the CI-Connect platform in order to integrate the service with CMS specific needs, including specific Site submission, accounting of jobs and automated reporting to standard CMS monitoring resources in an effortless way to their users

    Ant homing ability is not diminished when traveling backwards

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    Ants are known to be capable of homing to their nest after displacement to a novel location. This is widely assumed to involve some form of retinotopic matching between their current view and previously experienced views. One simple algorithm proposed to explain this behavior is continuous retinotopic alignment, in which the ant constantly adjusts its heading by rotating to minimize the pixel-wise difference of its current view from all views stored while facing the nest. However, ants with large prey items will often drag them home while facing backwards. We tested whether displaced ants (Myrmecia croslandi) dragging prey could still home despite experiencing an inverted view of their surroundings under these conditions. Ants moving backwards with food took similarly direct paths to the nest as ants moving forward without food, demonstrating that continuous retinotopic alignment is not a critical component of homing. It is possible that ants use initial or intermittent retinotopic alignment, coupled with some other direction stabilizing cue that they can utilize when moving backward. However, though most ants dragging prey would occasionally look toward the nest, we observed that their heading direction was not noticeably improved afterwards. We assume ants must use comparison of current and stored images for corrections of their path, but suggest they are either able to chose the appropriate visual memory for comparison using an additional mechanism; or can make such comparisons without retinotopic alignment

    Hands off : a handshake interaction detection and localization model for COVID-19 threat control

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    A handshake interaction localization model in real-time that may help mitigate the threat for transmitting COVID-19, is presented using computer vision in a non-intrusive technique. A real-time detection model (using YOLO/you only look once) is proposed to identify handshake interactions in realistic scenarios. YOLO can detect multiple interactions in a single frame. The model can be applied to public spaces to identify handshake interactions. The study is the first to use a human interaction localization model in a multi-person setting. YOLO is a convolutional neural network (CNN) for object detection in real-time.Lewis Power, Singapor

    Search for the Higgs boson in events with missing transverse energy and b quark jets produced in proton-antiproton collisions at s**(1/2)=1.96 TeV

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    We search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with an electroweak vector boson in events with no identified charged leptons, large imbalance in transverse momentum, and two jets where at least one contains a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of b hadrons. We use ~1 fb-1 integrated luminosity of proton-antiproton collisions at s**(1/2)=1.96 TeV recorded by the CDF II experiment at the Tevatron. We find 268 (16) single (double) b-tagged candidate events, where 248 +/- 43 (14.4 +/- 2.7) are expected from standard model background processes. We place 95% confidence level upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section for several Higgs boson masses ranging from 110 GeV/c2 to 140 GeV/c2. For a mass of 115 GeV/c2 the observed (expected) limit is 20.4 (14.2) times the standard model prediction.Comment: 8 pages, 2 figures, submitted to Phys. Rev. Let
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