5,827 research outputs found

    What can the UK learn from President Trump’s travel ban?

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    The US travel ban has sparked outrage both within and outside the country. The alleged motive behind it – to protect the nation from terrorists – is of particular importance to the UK, where terrorism also remains a key concern since 9/11. Lee Jarvis explains what lessons Britain can take from the situation

    The proscription or listing of terrorist organisations: Understanding, assessment, and international comparisons

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    This article serves as an introduction to this Special Issue on the banning or proscription of terrorist organisations around the world. It begins by arguing for greater attention to proscription powers because of their contemporary ubiquity, considerable historical lineage, implications for political life, and ambiguous effectiveness. Following an overview of the Issue’s questions and ambitions, the article discusses five themes: key moments of continuity and change within proscription regimes around the world; the significance of domestic political and legal contexts and institutions; the value of this power in countering terrorism and beyond; a range of prominent criticisms of proscription, including around civil liberties; and the significance of language and other symbolic practices in the justification and extension of proscription powers. We conclude by sketching the arguments and contributions of the subsequent articles in this Issue

    There are serious question marks over the effectiveness andappropriateness of proscribing terrorist organisations

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    British Home Secretaries and Prime Ministers have occasionally proscribed organisations which are violent or completely intolerant in outlook, banning various apparent terrorist organisations under a 2000 act of Parliament. But is it effective? Lee Jarvis and Tim Legrand argue that it is not, and raise problems with the identification and designation of these groups, the politicisation of the process, freedom of speech and expression, and efficacy

    Public conceptions and constructions of 'British values': A qualitative analysis

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    This article draws on original focus group research to explore constructions of ‘British values’, in ‘everyday’ discourse. Two prominent, yet competing, conceptions of this term are identified: political/institutional and social/cultural. Although each of these conceptions risks essentialising ‘British values’, this risk is mitigated by publics in at least three ways: (i) explicit recognition of the term’s ambiguities; (ii) discussion of its political motivations and exclusionary outcomes; and, (iii) identification of qualitative change in the meaning of ‘British values’ over time. As the first exploration of public understandings of this term, their differences, and these complications, the paper offers three contributions: (i) adding breadth to existing studies of everyday nationalism through focus on ‘British values’ specifically; (ii) shedding light on this trope’s work in broader conversations around social and political life in the UK; and (iii) facilitating reflection on the reception of, resistance to, and re-making of elite political discourse

    Affecting Terrorism: Laughter, lamentation, and detestation as drives to terrorism knowledge

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    The contemporary fascination with terrorism in Anglo-American popular culture, political discourse, news reportage, and beyond is boundless and well documented. In this article, we explore contemporary productions of terrorism as the outcome of three drives to knowledge: laugher, lamentation, and detestation. Drawing on a range of social and cultural practices—including jokes, street art, film, memorial projects, elite rhetoric, and abuse scandals—we make two arguments. First, that humor, grief, and hatred underpin and saturate the contemporary desire to know terrorism. And, second, that—although these drives function in multiple and ambiguous ways—they serve to institute a distance between the subject and object of terrorism knowledge, not least by encouraging us to laugh at those punished for terrorism, mourn for those lost in attacks, and direct our hatred toward those responsible. This analysis not only opens fresh insight into the workings of terrorism discourse in the post-9/11 period, it also points to connections between contemporary “critical” work on terrorism and debate on the role of emotions and affect in international politics more broadly

    A note on monopole moduli spaces

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    We discuss the structure of the framed moduli space of Bogomolny monopoles for arbitrary symmetry breaking and extend the definition of its stratification to the case of arbitrary compact Lie groups. We show that each stratum is a union of submanifolds for which we conjecture that the natural L2L^2 metric is hyperKahler. The dimensions of the strata and of these submanifolds are calculated, and it is found that for the latter, the dimension is always a multiple of four.Comment: 17 pages, LaTe

    The Cyberterrorism Threat: Findings from a Survey of Researchers

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    This article reports on a recent research project exploring academic perspectives on the threat posed by cyberterrorism. The project employed a survey method, which returned 118 responses from researchers working across 24 different countries. The article begins with a brief review of existing literature on this topic, distinguishing between those concerned by the imminent threat of cyberterrorism, and other, more sceptical, views. Following a discussion on method, the article's analysis section then details findings from three research questions: (i) Does cyberterrorism constitute a significant threat? If so, against whom or what?; (ii) Has a cyberterrorism attack ever taken place?’; and, (iii) What are the most effective countermeasures against cyberterrorism? Are there significant differences to more traditional forms of anti- or counter-terrorism? The article concludes by reflecting on areas of continuity and discontinuity between academic debate on cyberterrorism and on terrorism more broadly

    State Cyberterrorism: A Contradiction in Terms?

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    This article explores findings from a global survey of the terrorism research community to explore whether states may be deemed capable of conducting cyberterrorism. The article begins with a brief review of recent literature on state terrorism, identifying empirical and analytical justifications for greater use of this concept. Following a discussion of our research methodology we make two arguments. First, that there exists considerable ‘expert’ support for the validity of the proposition that states can indeed engage in cyberterrorism. Second, that whether states are deemed capable of cyberterrorism has implications for subsidiary debates, including around the threat that cyberterrorism poses

    Analogy and Authority in Cyberterrorism Discourse: An Analysis of Global News Media Coverage

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    This article explores constructions of cyberterrorism within the global news media between 2008 and 2013. It begins by arguing that the preoccupation with questions of definition, threat and response in academic literature on cyberterrorism is problematic, for two reasons. First, because it neglects the constitutivity of representations of cyberterrorism in the news media and beyond; and, second, because it prioritises policy-relevant research. To address this, the article provides a discursive analysis drawing on original empirical research into 31 news media outlets across the world. Although there is genuine heterogeneity in representations of cyberterrorism therein, we argue that constructions of this threat rely heavily on two strategies. First, appeals to authoritative or expert ‘witnesses’ and their institutional or epistemic credibility. And, second, generic or historical analogies, which help shape understanding of the likelihood and consequences of cyberterrorist attack. These strategies have particularly discursive importance, we argue, given the lack of readily available empirical examples of the ‘reality’ of cyberterroris
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