70,629 research outputs found

    Comment on "Classical and Quantum Interaction of the Dipole"

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    In this paper I have presented Comment on Anandan's paper (J. Anandan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1354 (2000)) [hep-th/9910018].Comment: 1 page, revtex; small changes, mainly typos, according to the published version in Phys. Rev. Let

    Comment on "R\"{o}ntgen Quantum Phase Shift: A Semiclassical Local Electrodynamical Effect?''

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    This paper is Comment on the paper: S.A.R. Horsley and M. Babiker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 010405 (2005).Comment: minor changes in the text, some references are changed, according to the version which is accepted for publication in Phys. Rev. Let

    Electric-Magnetic Duality and Topological Insulators

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    We work out the action of the SL(2,Z) electric-magnetic duality group for an insulator with a non-trivial permittivity, permeability and theta-angle. This theory has recently been proposed to be the correct low-energy effective action for topological insulators. As applications, we give manifestly SL(2,Z) covariant expressions for the Faraday rotation at orthogonal incidence at the interface of two such materials, as well as for the induced magnetic and electric charges, slightly clarifying the meaning of expressions previously derived in the literature. We also use electric-magnetic duality to find a gravitational dual for a strongly coupled version of this theory using the AdS/CFT correspondence.Comment: 4 pages; version accepted by PR

    Biot-Savart-like law in electrostatics

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    The Biot-Savart law is a well-known and powerful theoretical tool used to calculate magnetic fields due to currents in magnetostatics. We extend the range of applicability and the formal structure of the Biot-Savart law to electrostatics by deriving a Biot-Savart-like law suitable for calculating electric fields. We show that, under certain circumstances, the traditional Dirichlet problem can be mapped onto a much simpler Biot-Savart-like problem. We find an integral expression for the electric field due to an arbitrarily shaped, planar region kept at a fixed electric potential, in an otherwise grounded plane. As a by-product we present a very simple formula to compute the field produced in the plane defined by such a region. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach by calculating the electric field produced by planar regions of a few nontrivial shapes.Comment: 14 pages, 6 figures, RevTex, accepted for publication in the European Journal of Physic

    The total nucleon-nucleon cross section at large N_c

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    It is shown that at sufficiently large NcN_c for incident momenta which are much larger than the QCD, the total nucleon-nucleon cross section is independent of incident momentum and given by σtotal=2πlog2(Nc)/(mπ2)\sigma^{\rm total}=2 \pi \log^2(N_c) / (m^2_{\pi}). This result is valid in the extreme large NcN_c regime of log(Nc)1\log(N_c) \gg 1 and has corrections of relative order log(log(Nc))/log(Nc)\log (\log(N_c))/\log(N_c). A possible connection of this result to the Froissart-Martin bound is discussed.Comment: 4 page

    A simple variational principle for classical spinning particle with anomalous magnetic momentum

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    We obtain Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equations of motion of classical spinning particle using Lagrangian variational principle with Grassmann variables.Comment: 3 pages, late

    Towards a bulk theory of flexoelectricity

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    Flexoelectricity is the linear response of polarization to a strain gradient. Here we address the simplest class of dielectrics, namely elemental cubic crystals, and we prove that therein there is no extrinsic (i.e. surface) contribution to flexoelectricity in the thermodynamic limit. The flexoelectric tensor is expressed as a bulk response of the solid, manifestly independent of surface configurations. Furthermore, we prove that the flexoelectric responses induced by a long-wavelength phonon and by a uniform strain gradient are identical.Comment: 5 pages, 1 figure (2 panels

    The effect of starspots on the radii of low-mass pre-main sequence stars

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    A polytropic model is used to investigate the effects of dark photospheric spots on the evolution and radii of magnetically active, low-mass (M<0.5Msun), pre-main sequence (PMS) stars. Spots slow the contraction along Hayashi tracks and inflate the radii of PMS stars by a factor of (1-beta)^{-N} compared to unspotted stars of the same luminosity, where beta is the equivalent covering fraction of dark starspots and N \simeq 0.45+/-0.05. This is a much stronger inflation than predicted by the models of Spruit & Weiss (1986) for main sequence stars with the same beta, where N \sim 0.2 to 0.3. These models have been compared to radii determined for very magnetically active K- and M-dwarfs in the young Pleiades and NGC 2516 clusters, and the radii of tidally-locked, low-mass eclipsing binary components. The binary components and ZAMS K-dwarfs have radii inflated by \sim 10 per cent compared to an empirical radius-luminosity relation that is defined by magnetically inactive field dwarfs with interferometrically measured radii; low-mass M-type PMS stars, that are still on their Hayashi tracks, are inflated by up to \sim 40 per cent. If this were attributable to starspots alone, we estimate that an effective spot coverage of 0.35 < beta < 0.51 is required. Alternatively, global inhibition of convective flux transport by dynamo-generated fields may play a role. However, we find greater consistency with the starspot models when comparing the loci of active young stars and inactive field stars in colour-magnitude diagrams, particularly for the highly inflated PMS stars, where the large, uniform temperature reduction required in globally inhibited convection models would cause the stars to be much redder than observed.Comment: MNRAS in press, 13 page
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