5 research outputs found

    Concerns and Expectations of Risk-Reducing Surgery in Women with Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome

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    Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome (HBOC) carriers face complex decisions, which might affect their fertility and body image. Using an anonymous 40-items questionnaire we evaluated the expectations and concerns about Risk-Reducing Surgery (RRS) in 204 carriers. Participants are well-informed about the options to manage cancer risk, and women with previous cancer are more concerned with screening failure. Satisfaction with RR Mastectomy is high, even if many carriers are unsatisfied with reconstructed breast feel and nipple-areola complex tactile sensation and those with previous breast cancer report a change in their sexual habits. The decrease of libido and vaginal dryness are the most complained symptoms after RR Salpingo-Oophorectomy. Nevertheless, most carriers would choose RRS again, due to cancer risk or screening-related stress reduction. Women who deferred RRS are more afraid of menopausal symptoms and cancer risk than those who had undergone or declined surgery. Women who declined RRS feel well-informed and trust screening procedures. In conclusion, HBOC carriers consider themselves well-informed and able to choose the best option for their condition, would choose RRS again because of cancer risk and screening-related stress reduction, and those who delay RRS face a higher preoperative level of concern and need support

    Adherence to Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

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    Background: Adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) reduces breast cancer recurrence and mortality of women with hormone-receptor-positive tumors, but poor adherence remains a significant problem. The aim of this study was to analyze AET side effects and their impact on adherence to treatment. Methods: A total of 373 breast cancer patients treated with AET filled out a specific questionnaire during their follow up visits at the Breast Unit of our Centre. Results: Side effects were reported by 81% of patients, 84% of those taking tamoxifen and 80% of those taking aromatase inhibitors (AIs). The most common side effect in the tamoxifen group was hot flashes (55.6%), while in the AI group it was arthralgia (60.6%). The addition of GnRH agonists to both tamoxifen and AI significantly worsened all menopausal symptoms. Overall, 12% of patients definitively discontinued AET due to side effects, 6.4% during the first 5 years and 24% during extended therapy. Patients who had previously received chemotherapy or radiotherapy reported a significantly lower discontinuation rate. Conclusions: AET side effects represent a significant problem in breast cancer survivors leading to irregular assumption and discontinuation of therapy. Adherence to AET may be improved by trustful patient–physician communication and a good-quality care network

    Adherence to Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

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    Background: Adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) reduces breast cancer recurrence and mortality of women with hormone-receptor-positive tumors, but poor adherence remains a significant problem. The aim of this study was to analyze AET side effects and their impact on adherence to treatment. Methods: A total of 373 breast cancer patients treated with AET filled out a specific questionnaire during their follow up visits at the Breast Unit of our Centre. Results: Side effects were reported by 81% of patients, 84% of those taking tamoxifen and 80% of those taking aromatase inhibitors (AIs). The most common side effect in the tamoxifen group was hot flashes (55.6%), while in the AI group it was arthralgia (60.6%). The addition of GnRH agonists to both tamoxifen and AI significantly worsened all menopausal symptoms. Overall, 12% of patients definitively discontinued AET due to side effects, 6.4% during the first 5 years and 24% during extended therapy. Patients who had previously received chemotherapy or radiotherapy reported a significantly lower discontinuation rate. Conclusions: AET side effects represent a significant problem in breast cancer survivors leading to irregular assumption and discontinuation of therapy. Adherence to AET may be improved by trustful patient–physician communication and a good-quality care network

    The “Sandwich” Schedule: A Well-Tolerated Adjuvant Treatment Both in Intermediate–High- and High-Risk Endometrial Cancer

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    (1) Background: In intermediate–high- and high-risk endometrial cancer (EC), radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) play a basic role. However, there is controversy regarding the optimal timing of their combination. The “sandwich” schedule involves adjuvant CT followed by RT and subsequent CT. The aim of this study is to assess the tolerability and efficacy of the “sandwich” schedule. (2) Methods: A retrospective study was conducted in two gynecological oncology units in Torino, Italy, from 1 January 2003 until 31 December 2021. Intermediate–high- and high-risk patients with available clinical data were included. Compliance with treatment, CT and RT toxicities, disease-free survival (DFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. (3) Results: A total of 118 patients were selected: 27.1% FIGO I-II stages and 72.9% III-IV. Most of the patients (75.4%) received a carboplatin–paclitaxel combination, and as much as 94.9% of CT cycles were completed. Chemotherapy-related G3-4 toxicities were detected in 5.3% of the patients, almost half of which were hematological. Grade 2 gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were reported in 8.4% and 4.2% of cases, respectively. With a median follow-up of 46 months, DFS was 77.6%, CSS was 70% and 5-year OS was 54%. (4) Conclusions: The “sandwich” schedule for CT and RT combination is an effective adjuvant treatment with low toxicity both in intermediate–high- and high-risk EC
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