63,799 research outputs found

    Coping strategies for staff involved in assessment of laboratory write-ups

    Get PDF
    Laboratory-based practical exercises, which are an important and time-consuming part of many science degree courses, may be directed towards a variety of learning objectives. Some of these have traditionally been assessed by staff marking the student's written account of the laboratory experiment (the laboratory write-up) but increasing student numbers, which may have doubled or quadrupled on some modules, have made it difficult to sustain this approach. In addition, there is evidence that the formative element of the assessment (i.e. the comments written by staff on the laboratory write-up) is not fully utilized by students who are often only interested in the mark given. This paper reports on experience with the various strategies which may be used to cope with the increased marking load while maintaining or improving the learning gain from the formative element of the assessment. The adoption of a balanced mixture of strategies may present the best solution to the problem but must be tailored to local circumstances

    The Findings of an Assessment Audit: an NTFS Project Report

    Get PDF
    An Assessment Audit is described consisting of 47 questions, each being scored 0 to 4, by the module team depending on the extent to which the audit point was satisfied. Scores of 2 or less indicated unsatisfactory provision. Audits were carried out on 14 bioscience- or medicine- based modules in 13 universities. There was great variability between modules in the hours spent by: • teachers in direct contact with students (12 to 914); • teachers involved in the process of assessment (2 to 372); • students actually being assessed (2 to 60 hours per student); • students in the teaching and learning process (35 to 300). The highest scoring module obtained 133 out of 188 (71%) with 11 out of 47 items scored at 2 or less while the lowest scoring module obtained 47% with 27 items scoring 2 or less. Features consistently poorly addressed were: • consideration of learning objectives/assessment in other modules taken by the student; • consideration of consistency among multiple markers; • use of known mark sets to validate data processing; • availability of exemplar answers; • feedback on end-of-module assessments. A common issue concerns the isolation of modules and module teams. This suggests the need for a strengthening of the course thread and emphasis on the totality of the student learning experience rather than the individual module. The audit provides a framework within which course teams can reflect on and improve the quality of the assessment in their module

    The Impact of Acoustic Imaging Geometry on the Fidelity of Seabed Bathymetric Models

    Get PDF
    Attributes derived from digital bathymetric models (DBM) are a powerful means of analyzing seabed characteristics. Those models however are inherently constrained by the method of seabed sampling. Most bathymetric models are derived by collating a number of discrete corridors of multibeam sonar data. Within each corridor the data are collected over a wide range of distances, azimuths and elevation angles and thus the quality varies significantly. That variability therefore becomes imprinted into the DBM. Subsequent users of the DBM, unfamiliar with the original acquisition geometry, may potentially misinterpret such variability as attributes of the seabed. This paper examines the impact on accuracy and resolution of the resultant derived model as a function of the imaging geometry. This can be broken down into the range, angle, azimuth, density and overlap attributes. These attributes in turn are impacted by the sonar configuration including beam widths, beam spacing, bottom detection algorithms, stabilization strategies, platform speed and stability. Superimposed over the imaging geometry are residual effects due to imperfect integration of ancillary sensors. As the platform (normally a surface vessel), is moving with characteristic motions resulting from the ocean wave spectrum, periodic residuals in the seafloor can become imprinted that may again be misinterpreted as geomorphological information

    First wide-angle view of channelized turbidity currents links migrating cyclic steps to flow characteristics

    Get PDF
    Field observations of turbidity currents remain scarce, and thus there is continued debate about their internal structure and how they modify underlying bedforms. Here, I present the results of a new imaging method that examines multiple surge-like turbidity currents within a delta front channel, as they pass over crescent-shaped bedforms. Seven discrete flows over a 2-h period vary in speed from 0.5 to 3.0 ms−1. Only flows that exhibit a distinct acoustically attenuating layer at the base, appear to cause bedform migration. That layer thickens abruptly downstream of the bottom of the lee slope of the bedform, and the upper surface of the layer fluctuates rapidly at that point. The basal layer is inferred to reflect a strong near-bed gradient in density and the thickening is interpreted as a hydraulic jump. These results represent field-scale flow observations in support of a cyclic step origin of crescent-shaped bedforms

    Quick Breads

    Get PDF
    PDF pages: 2

    Spin structure functions

    Get PDF
    We review the study of the internal spin structure of the proton and neutron. High-energy scattering of polarized leptons by polarized protons, neutrons, and deuterons provides a measurement of the nucleon spin structure functions. These structure functions give information on the polarized quark contributions to the spin of the proton and the neutron and allow tests of the quark-parton model and quantum chromodynamics. We discuss the formalism of deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons on polarized nucleons, the past decade of experimental progress, and future programs to measure the polarized gluon contribution to the proton spin

    Hospitality in the Home

    Get PDF
    PDF pages: 4
    corecore