19 research outputs found

    The dependence of subhalo abundance matching on galaxy photometry and selection criteria

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    Subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) is a popular technique for assigning galaxy mass or luminosity to haloes produced in N-body simulations. The method works by matching the cumulative number functions of the galaxy and halo properties, and is therefore sensitive both to the precise definitions of those properties and to the selection criteria used to define the samples. Further dependence follows when SHAM parameters are calibrated with galaxy clustering, which is known to depend strongly on the manner in which galaxies are selected. In this paper we introduce a new parametrisation for SHAM and derive the best-fit SHAM parameters as a function of various properties of the selection of the galaxy sample and of the photometric definition, including S\'ersic vs Petrosian magnitudes, stellar masses vs r-band magnitudes and optical (SDSS) vs HI (ALFALFA) selection. In each case we calculate the models' goodness-of-fit to measurements of the projected two-point galaxy correlation function. In the optically-selected samples we find strong evidence that the scatter in the galaxy-halo connection increases towards the faint end, and that AM performs better with luminosity than stellar mass. The SHAM parameters of optically- and HI-selected galaxies are mutually exclusive, with the latter suggesting the importance of properties beyond halo mass. We provide best-fit parameters for the SHAM galaxy-halo connection as a function of each of our input choices, extending the domain of validity of the model while reducing potential systematic error in its use.Comment: 19 pages and 15 figures. Matches the journal versio

    The central role of magnesium deficiency in Tourette's syndrome: causal relationships between magnesium deficiency, altered biochemical pathways and symptoms relating to Tourette's syndrome and several reported comorbid conditions

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    The DUNE Far Detector Vertical Drift Technology, Technical Design Report

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    International audienceDUNE is an international experiment dedicated to addressing some of the questions at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics, including the mystifying preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe. The dual-site experiment will employ an intense neutrino beam focused on a near and a far detector as it aims to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to make high-precision measurements of the PMNS matrix parameters, including the CP-violating phase. It will also stand ready to observe supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector implements liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) technology, and combines the many tens-of-kiloton fiducial mass necessary for rare event searches with the sub-centimeter spatial resolution required to image those events with high precision. The addition of a photon detection system enhances physics capabilities for all DUNE physics drivers and opens prospects for further physics explorations. Given its size, the far detector will be implemented as a set of modules, with LArTPC designs that differ from one another as newer technologies arise. In the vertical drift LArTPC design, a horizontal cathode bisects the detector, creating two stacked drift volumes in which ionization charges drift towards anodes at either the top or bottom. The anodes are composed of perforated PCB layers with conductive strips, enabling reconstruction in 3D. Light-trap-style photon detection modules are placed both on the cryostat's side walls and on the central cathode where they are optically powered. This Technical Design Report describes in detail the technical implementations of each subsystem of this LArTPC that, together with the other far detector modules and the near detector, will enable DUNE to achieve its physics goals

    The DUNE Far Detector Vertical Drift Technology, Technical Design Report

    No full text
    DUNE is an international experiment dedicated to addressing some of the questions at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics, including the mystifying preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe. The dual-site experiment will employ an intense neutrino beam focused on a near and a far detector as it aims to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to make high-precision measurements of the PMNS matrix parameters, including the CP-violating phase. It will also stand ready to observe supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector implements liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) technology, and combines the many tens-of-kiloton fiducial mass necessary for rare event searches with the sub-centimeter spatial resolution required to image those events with high precision. The addition of a photon detection system enhances physics capabilities for all DUNE physics drivers and opens prospects for further physics explorations. Given its size, the far detector will be implemented as a set of modules, with LArTPC designs that differ from one another as newer technologies arise. In the vertical drift LArTPC design, a horizontal cathode bisects the detector, creating two stacked drift volumes in which ionization charges drift towards anodes at either the top or bottom. The anodes are composed of perforated PCB layers with conductive strips, enabling reconstruction in 3D. Light-trap-style photon detection modules are placed both on the cryostat's side walls and on the central cathode where they are optically powered. This Technical Design Report describes in detail the technical implementations of each subsystem of this LArTPC that, together with the other far detector modules and the near detector, will enable DUNE to achieve its physics goals
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